c121d1bec729eb09a8b08a1f453c40c7d184fcda
[apps/madmutt.git] / doc / manual.xml.head
1 <?xml version="1.0" standalone="no"?>
2 <!DOCTYPE book PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.1.2//EN"
3 "http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.2/docbookx.dtd">
4
5 <book>
6
7 <bookinfo>
8   <title>The Mutt Next Generation E-Mail Client</title>
9   <author>
10     <firstname>Andreas</firstname><surname>Krennmair</surname>
11     <email>ak@synflood.at</email>
12   </author>
13   <author>
14     <firstname>Michael</firstname><surname>Elkins</surname>
15     <email>me@cs.hmc.edu</email>
16   </author>
17   <pubdate>version devel-r473</pubdate>
18   <abstract>
19     <para>
20       Michael Elinks on mutt, circa 1995:
21       ``All mail clients suck. This one just sucks less.''
22     </para>
23     <para>
24       Sven Guckes on mutt, ca. 2003: ``But it still sucks!''
25     </para>
26   </abstract>
27 </bookinfo>
28
29 <chapter> <!--{{{-->
30   <title>Introduction  </title>
31   
32   <sect1>
33     <title>Overview  </title>
34     
35     <para>
36       <emphasis role="bold">Mutt-ng</emphasis> is a small but very
37       powerful text-based MIME mail client.  Mutt-ng is highly
38       configurable, and is well suited to the mail power user with
39       advanced features like key bindings, keyboard macros, mail
40       threading, regular expression searches and a powerful pattern
41       matching language for selecting groups of messages.
42     </para>
43     
44     <para>
45       This documentation additionally contains documentation to
46       <emphasis role="bold"> Mutt-NG </emphasis> ,a fork from Mutt
47       with the goal to fix all the little annoyances of Mutt, to
48       integrate all the Mutt patches that are floating around in the
49       web, and to add other new features. Features specific to Mutt-ng
50       will be discussed in an extra section. Don't be confused when
51       most of the documentation talk about Mutt and not Mutt-ng,
52       Mutt-ng contains all Mutt features, plus many more.
53     </para>
54     
55     <para>
56       
57     </para>
58     
59   </sect1>
60   
61   <sect1>
62     <title>Mutt-ng Home Page  </title>
63     
64     <para>
65       <ulink url="http://www.muttng.org/">http://www.muttng.org</ulink>
66     </para>
67     
68     <para>
69       
70     </para>
71     
72   </sect1>
73   
74   <sect1>
75     <title>Mailing Lists  </title>
76     
77     <para>
78       
79       <itemizedlist>
80         <listitem>
81           
82           <para>
83             <email>mutt-ng-users@lists.berlios.de</email>: This is
84             where the mutt-ng user support happens.
85           </para>
86         </listitem>
87         <listitem>
88           
89           <para>
90             <email>mutt-ng-devel@lists.berlios.de</email>: The
91             development mailing list for mutt-ng
92           </para>
93         </listitem>
94         
95       </itemizedlist>
96       
97     </para>
98     
99     <para>
100       
101     </para>
102     
103   </sect1>
104   
105   <sect1>
106     <title>Software Distribution Sites  </title>
107     
108     <para>
109       So far, there are no official releases of Mutt-ng, but you can
110       download daily snapshots from <ulink
111         url="http://mutt-ng.berlios.de/snapshots/"
112         >http://mutt-ng.berlios.de/snapshots/</ulink>
113     </para>
114     
115     <para>
116       
117     </para>
118     
119   </sect1>
120   
121   <sect1>
122     <title>IRC  </title>
123     
124     <para>
125       Visit channel <emphasis>#muttng</emphasis> on <ulink
126         url="http://www.freenode.net/">irc.freenode.net
127         (www.freenode.net) </ulink> to chat with other people
128       interested in Mutt-ng.  
129     </para>
130     
131   </sect1>
132   
133   <sect1>
134     <title>Weblog  </title>
135     
136     <para>
137       If you want to read fresh news about the latest development in
138       Mutt-ng, and get informed about stuff like interesting,
139       Mutt-ng-related articles and packages for your favorite
140       distribution, you can read and/or subscribe to our <ulink
141         url="http://mutt-ng.supersized.org/">Mutt-ng development
142         weblog</ulink>.
143     </para>
144     
145   </sect1>
146   
147   <sect1>
148     <title>Copyright  </title>
149     
150     <para>
151       Mutt is Copyright (C) 1996-2000 Michael R. Elkins
152       &lt;me@cs.hmc.edu&gt; and others
153     </para>
154     
155     <para>
156       This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
157       it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
158       the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
159       (at your option) any later version.
160     </para>
161     
162     <para>
163       This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
164       but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
165       MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
166       GNU General Public License for more details.
167     </para>
168     
169     <para>
170       You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
171       along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
172       Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111, USA.
173     </para>
174     
175   </sect1>
176   
177 </chapter>
178   <!--}}}-->
179
180 <chapter>
181   <title>Getting Started    </title>
182   
183   <sect1> <!--{{{-->
184     <title>Basic Concepts      </title>
185     
186     <sect2> <!--{{{-->
187       <title>Screens and Menus        </title>
188       
189       <para>
190         mutt-ng offers different screens of which every has its special
191         purpose:
192       </para>
193       
194       <para>
195         
196         <itemizedlist>
197           <listitem>
198             
199             <para>
200               The <emphasis>index</emphasis> displays the contents of the
201               currently opened
202               mailbox.
203               
204             </para>
205           </listitem>
206           <listitem>
207             
208             <para>
209               The <emphasis>pager</emphasis> is responsible for displaying
210               messages, that
211               is, the header, the body and all attached parts.
212               
213             </para>
214           </listitem>
215           <listitem>
216             
217             <para>
218               The <emphasis>file browser</emphasis> offers operations on and
219               displays
220               information of all folders mutt-ng should watch for mail.
221               
222             </para>
223           </listitem>
224           <listitem>
225             
226             <para>
227               The <emphasis>sidebar</emphasis> offers a permanent view of
228               which mailboxes
229               contain how many total, new and/or flagged mails.
230               
231             </para>
232           </listitem>
233           <listitem>
234             
235             <para>
236               The <emphasis>help screen</emphasis> lists for all currently
237               available
238               commands how to invoke them as well as a short description.
239               
240             </para>
241           </listitem>
242           <listitem>
243             
244             <para>
245               The <emphasis>compose</emphasis> menu is a comfortable
246               interface take last
247               actions before sending mail: change subjects, attach files,
248               remove
249               attachements, etc.
250               
251             </para>
252           </listitem>
253           <listitem>
254             
255             <para>
256               The <emphasis>attachement</emphasis> menu gives a summary and
257               the tree
258               structure of the attachements of the current message.
259               
260             </para>
261           </listitem>
262           <listitem>
263             
264             <para>
265               The <emphasis>alias</emphasis> menu lists all or a fraction of
266               the aliases
267               a user has defined.
268               
269             </para>
270           </listitem>
271           <listitem>
272             
273             <para>
274               The <emphasis>key</emphasis> menu used in connection with
275               encryption lets
276               users choose the right key to encrypt with.
277               
278             </para>
279           </listitem>
280           
281         </itemizedlist>
282         
283       </para>
284       
285       <para>
286         When mutt-ng is started without any further options, it'll open
287         the users default mailbox and display the index.
288       </para>
289       
290       <para>
291         
292       </para>
293       
294     </sect2>
295       <!--}}}-->
296     
297     <sect2> <!--{{{-->
298       <title>Configuration        </title>
299       
300       <para>
301         Mutt-ng does <emphasis>not</emphasis> feature an internal
302         configuration
303         interface or menu due to the simple fact that this would be too
304         complex to handle (currently there are several <emphasis>hundred</emphasis>
305         variables which fine-tune the behaviour.)
306       </para>
307       
308       <para>
309         Mutt-ng is configured using configuration files which allow
310         users to add comments or manage them via version control systems
311         to ease maintenance.
312       </para>
313       
314       <para>
315         Also, mutt-ng comes with a shell script named <literal>grml-muttng</literal>
316         kindly contributed by users which really helps and eases the
317         creation of a user's configuration file. When downloading the
318         source code via a snapshot or via subversion, it can be found in
319         the <literal>contrib</literal> directory.
320       </para>
321       
322       <para>
323         
324       </para>
325       
326     </sect2>
327       <!--}}}-->
328     
329     <sect2> <!--{{{-->
330       <title>Functions        </title>
331       
332       <para>
333         Mutt-ng offers great flexibility due to the use of functions:
334         internally, every action a user can make mutt-ng perform is named
335         ``function.'' Those functions are assigned to keys (or even key
336         sequences) and may be completely adjusted to user's needs. The
337         basic idea is that the impatient users get a very intuitive
338         interface to start off with and advanced users virtually get no
339         limits to adjustments.
340       </para>
341       
342       <para>
343         
344       </para>
345       
346     </sect2>
347       <!--}}}-->
348     
349     <sect2> <!--{{{-->
350       <title>Interaction        </title>
351       
352       <para>
353         Mutt-ng has two basic concepts of user interaction:
354       </para>
355       
356       <para>
357         
358         <orderedlist>
359           <listitem>
360             
361             <para>
362               There is one dedicated line on the screen used to query
363               the user for input, issue any command, query variables and
364               display error and informational messages. As for every type of
365               user input, this requires manual action leading to the need of
366               input.
367               
368             </para>
369           </listitem>
370           <listitem>
371             
372             <para>
373               The automatized interface for interaction are the so
374               called <emphasis>hooks</emphasis>. Hooks specify actions the
375               user wants to be
376               performed at well-defined situations: what to do when entering
377               which folder, what to do when displaying or replying to what
378               kind of message, etc. These are optional, i.e. a user doesn't
379               need to specify them but can do so.
380               
381             </para>
382           </listitem>
383           
384         </orderedlist>
385         
386       </para>
387       
388       <para>
389         
390       </para>
391       
392     </sect2>
393       <!--}}}-->
394     
395     <sect2> <!--{{{-->
396       <title>Modularization        </title>
397       
398       <para>
399         Although mutt-ng has many functionality built-in, many
400         features can be delegated to external tools to increase
401         flexibility: users can define programs to filter a message through
402         before displaying, users can use any program they want for
403         displaying a message, message types (such as PDF or PostScript)
404         for which mutt-ng doesn't have a built-in filter can be rendered
405         by arbitrary tools and so forth. Although mutt-ng has an alias
406         mechanism built-in, it features using external tools to query for
407         nearly every type of addresses from sources like LDAP, databases
408         or just the list of locally known users.
409       </para>
410       
411       <para>
412         
413       </para>
414       
415     </sect2>
416       <!--}}}-->
417     
418     <sect2> <!--{{{-->
419       <title>Patterns        </title>
420       
421       <para>
422         Mutt-ng has a built-in pattern matching ``language'' which is
423         as widely used as possible to present a consistent interface to
424         users. The same ``pattern terms'' can be used for searching,
425         scoring, message selection and much more.
426       </para>
427       
428       <para>
429         
430       </para>
431       
432       <para>
433         
434       </para>
435       
436     </sect2>
437       <!--}}}-->
438     
439   </sect1>
440   
441   <!--}}}-->
442   
443   <sect1> <!--{{{-->
444     <title>Screens and Menus      </title>
445     
446     <sect2>
447       <title>Index       </title>
448       
449       <para>
450         The index is the screen that you usually see first when you
451         start mutt-ng. It gives an overview over your emails in the
452         currently opened mailbox. By default, this is your system mailbox.
453         The information you see in the index is a list of emails, each with
454         its number on the left, its flags (new email, important email,
455         email that has been forwarded or replied to, tagged email, ...),
456         the date when email was sent, its sender, the email size, and the
457         subject. Additionally, the index also shows thread hierarchies:
458         when you reply to an email, and the other person replies back, you
459         can see the other's person email in a "sub-tree" below.  This is
460         especially useful for personal email between a group of people or
461         when you've subscribed to mailing lists.
462       </para>
463       
464       <para>
465         
466       </para>
467       
468     </sect2>
469     
470     <sect2>
471       <title>Pager       </title>
472       
473       <para>
474         The pager is responsible for showing the email content. On the
475         top of the pager you have an overview over the most important email
476         headers like the sender, the recipient, the subject, and much more
477         information. How much information you actually see depends on your
478         configuration, which we'll describe below.
479       </para>
480       
481       <para>
482         Below the headers, you see the email body which usually contains
483         the message. If the email contains any attachments, you will see
484         more information about them below the email body, or, if the
485         attachments are text files, you can view them directly in the
486         pager.
487       </para>
488       
489       <para>
490         To give the user a good overview, it is possible to configure
491         mutt-ng to show different things in the pager with different
492         colors. Virtually everything that can be described with a regular
493         expression can be colored, e.g. URLs, email addresses or smileys.
494       </para>
495       
496       <para>
497         
498       </para>
499       
500     </sect2>
501     
502     <sect2>
503       <title>File Browser        </title>
504       
505       <para>
506         The file browser is the interface to the local or remote
507         file system. When selecting a mailbox to open, the browser allows
508         custom sorting of items, limiting the items shown by a regular
509         expression and a freely adjustable format of what to display in
510         which way. It also allows for easy navigation through the
511         file system when selecting file(s) to attach to a message, select
512         multiple files to attach and many more.
513       </para>
514       
515       <para>
516         
517       </para>
518       
519     </sect2>
520     
521     <sect2>
522       <title>Sidebar        </title>
523       
524       <para>
525         The sidebar comes in handy to manage mails which are spread
526         over different folders. All folders users setup mutt-ng to watch
527         for new mail will be listed. The listing includes not only the
528         name but also the number of total messages, the number of new and
529         flagged messages. Items with new mail may be colored different
530         from those with flagged mail, items may be shortened or compress
531         if they're they to long to be printed in full form so that by
532         abbreviated names, user still now what the name stands for.
533       </para>
534       
535       <para>
536         
537       </para>
538       
539     </sect2>
540     
541     <sect2>
542       <title>Help        </title>
543       
544       <para>
545         The help screen is meant to offer a quick help to the user. It
546         lists the current configuration of key bindings and their
547         associated commands including a short description, and currently
548         unbound functions that still need to be associated with a key
549         binding (or alternatively, they can be called via the mutt-ng
550         command prompt).
551       </para>
552       
553       <para>
554         
555       </para>
556       
557     </sect2>
558     
559     <sect2>
560       <title>Compose Menu          </title>
561       
562       <para>
563         The compose menu features a split screen containing the
564         information which really matter before actually sending a
565         message by mail or posting an article to a newsgroup: who gets
566         the message as what (recipient, newsgroup, who gets what kind of
567         copy). Additionally, users may set security options like
568         deciding whether to sign, encrypt or sign and encrypt a message
569         with/for what keys.
570       </para>
571       
572       <para>
573         Also, it's used to attach messages, news articles or files to
574         a message, to re-edit any attachment including the message
575         itself.
576       </para>
577       
578       <para>
579         
580       </para>
581       
582     </sect2>
583     
584     <sect2>
585       <title>Alias Menu          </title>
586       
587       <para>
588         The alias menu is used to help users finding the recipients
589         of messages. For users who need to contact many people, there's
590         no need to remember addresses or names completely because it
591         allows for searching, too. The alias mechanism and thus the
592         alias menu also features grouping several addresses by a shorter
593         nickname, the actual alias, so that users don't have to select
594         each single recipient manually.
595       </para>
596       
597       <para>
598         
599       </para>
600       
601     </sect2>
602     
603     <sect2>
604       <title>Attachment Menu          </title>
605       
606       <para>
607         As will be later discussed in detail, mutt-ng features a good
608         and stable MIME implementation, that is, is greatly supports
609         sending and receiving messages of arbitrary type. The
610         attachment menu displays a message's structure in detail: what
611         content parts are attached to which parent part (which gives a
612         true tree structure), which type is of what type and what size.
613         Single parts may saved, deleted or modified to offer great and
614         easy access to message's internals.
615       </para>
616       
617       <para>
618         
619       </para>
620       
621     </sect2>
622     
623     <sect2>
624       <title>Key Menu          </title>
625       
626       <para>
627         <literal>FIXME</literal>
628       </para>
629       
630       <para>
631         
632       </para>
633       
634       <para>
635         
636       </para>
637       
638     </sect2>
639     
640   </sect1>
641     <!--}}}-->
642   
643   <sect1> <!--{{{-->
644     <title>Moving Around in Menus  </title>
645     
646     <para>
647       Information is presented in menus, very similar to ELM.  Here is a
648       tableshowing the common keys used to navigate menus in Mutt-ng.
649     </para>
650     
651     <para>
652
653       <table>
654         <title>Default Menu Movement Keys</title>
655         <tgroup cols="3" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
656         <thead>
657           <row>
658             <entry>Key</entry>
659             <entry>Function</entry>
660             <entry>Description</entry>
661           </row>
662         </thead>
663         <tbody>
664           <row>
665             <entry><code>j</code> or <code>Down</code></entry>
666             <entry><code>next-entry</code></entry>
667             <entry>move to the next entry</entry>
668           </row>
669           <row>
670             <entry><code>k</code> or <code>Up</code></entry>
671             <entry><code>previous-entry</code></entry>
672             <entry>move to the previous entry</entry>
673           </row>
674           <row>
675             <entry><code>z</code> or <code>PageDn</code></entry>
676             <entry><code>page-down</code></entry>
677             <entry>go to the next page</entry>
678           </row>
679           <row>
680             <entry><code>Z</code> or <code>PageUp</code></entry>
681             <entry><code>page-up</code></entry>
682             <entry>go to the previous page</entry>
683           </row>
684           <row>
685             <entry><code>=</code> or <code>Home</code></entry>
686             <entry><code>first-entry</code></entry>
687             <entry>jump to the first entry</entry>
688           </row>
689           <row>
690             <entry><code>*</code> or <code>End</code></entry>
691             <entry><code>last-entry</code></entry>
692             <entry>jump to the last entry</entry>
693           </row>
694           <row>
695             <entry><code>q</code></entry>
696             <entry><code>quit</code></entry>
697             <entry>exit the current menu</entry>
698           </row>
699           <row>
700             <entry><code>?</code></entry>
701             <entry><code>help</code></entry>
702             <entry>list all key bindings for the current menu</entry>
703           </row>
704         </tbody>
705       </tgroup>
706     </table>
707
708
709     </para>
710     
711     <para>
712       
713     </para>
714     
715   </sect1>
716     <!--}}}-->
717   
718   <sect1 id="editing"> <!--{{{-->
719     <title>Editing Input Fields  </title>
720     
721     <para>
722       Mutt-ng has a builtin line editor which is used as the primary way to
723       input
724       textual data such as email addresses or filenames.  The keys used to
725       move
726       around while editing are very similar to those of Emacs.
727     </para>
728     
729     <para>
730
731       <table>
732         <title>Built-In Editor Functions</title>
733         <tgroup cols="3" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
734         <thead>
735           <row>
736             <entry>Key</entry>
737             <entry>Function</entry>
738             <entry>Description</entry>
739           </row>
740         </thead>
741         <tbody>
742           <row>
743             <entry><code>^A or &#60;Home&#62;  </code></entry>
744             <entry><code>bol     </code></entry>
745             <entry>move to the start of the line</entry>
746           </row>
747           <row>
748             <entry><code>^B or &#60;Left&#62;   </code></entry>
749             <entry><code>backward-char </code>
750             </entry><entry>move back one char</entry>
751           </row>
752           <row>
753             <entry><code>Esc B  </code></entry>
754             <entry><code>backward-word    </code></entry>
755             <entry>move back one word</entry>
756           </row>
757           <row>
758             <entry><code>^D or &#60;Delete&#62;  </code></entry>
759             <entry><code>delete-char    </code></entry>
760             <entry>delete the char under the cursor</entry>
761           </row>
762           <row>
763             <entry><code>^E or &#60;End&#62;   </code></entry>
764             <entry><code>eol          </code></entry>
765             <entry>move to the end of the line</entry>
766           </row>
767           <row>
768             <entry><code>^F or &#60;Right&#62;  </code></entry>
769             <entry><code>forward-char   </code></entry>
770             <entry>move forward one char</entry>
771           </row>
772           <row>
773             <entry><code>Esc F </code></entry>
774             <entry><code>forward-word      </code></entry>
775             <entry>move forward one word</entry>
776           </row>
777           <row>
778             <entry><code>&#60;Tab&#62;   </code></entry>
779             <entry><code>complete     </code></entry>
780             <entry>complete filename or alias</entry>
781           </row>
782           <row>
783             <entry><code>^T         </code></entry>
784             <entry><code>complete-query   </code></entry>
785             <entry>complete address with query</entry>
786           </row>
787           <row>
788             <entry><code>^K          </code></entry>
789             <entry><code>kill-eol      </code></entry>
790             <entry>delete to the end of the line</entry>
791           </row>
792           <row>
793             <entry><code>ESC d </code></entry>
794             <entry><code>kill-eow    </code></entry>
795             <entry>delete to the end of the word</entry>
796           </row>
797           <row>
798             <entry><code>^W     </code></entry>
799             <entry><code>kill-word     </code></entry>
800             <entry>kill the word in front of the cursor</entry>
801           </row>
802           <row>
803             <entry><code>^U      </code></entry>
804             <entry><code>kill-line      </code></entry>
805             <entry>delete entire line</entry>
806           </row>
807           <row>
808             <entry><code>^V       </code></entry>
809             <entry><code>quote-char    </code></entry>
810             <entry>quote the next typed key</entry>
811           </row>
812           <row>
813             <entry><code>&#60;Up&#62;   </code></entry>
814             <entry><code>history-up   </code></entry>
815             <entry>recall previous string from history</entry>
816           </row>
817           <row>
818             <entry><code>&#60;Down&#62;      </code></entry>
819             <entry><code>history-down   </code></entry>
820             <entry>recall next string from history</entry>
821           </row>
822           <row>
823             <entry><code>&#60;BackSpace&#62;  </code></entry>
824             <entry><code>backspace     </code></entry>
825             <entry>kill the char in front of the cursor</entry>
826           </row>
827           <row>
828             <entry><code>Esc u        </code></entry>
829             <entry><code>upcase-word      </code></entry>
830             <entry>convert word to upper case</entry>
831           </row>
832           <row>
833             <entry><code>Esc l        </code></entry>
834             <entry><code>downcase-word      </code></entry>
835             <entry>convert word to lower case</entry>
836           </row>
837           <row>
838             <entry><code>Esc c        </code></entry>
839             <entry><code>capitalize-word    </code></entry>
840             <entry>capitalize the word</entry>
841           </row>
842           <row>
843             <entry><code>^G           </code></entry>
844             <entry><code>n/a    </code></entry>
845             <entry>abort</entry>
846           </row>
847           <row>
848             <entry><code>&#60;Return&#62;     </code></entry>
849             <entry><code>n/a    </code></entry>
850             <entry>finish editing</entry>
851           </row>
852         </tbody>
853       </tgroup>
854     </table>
855
856     </para>
857     
858     <para>
859       You can remap the <emphasis>editor</emphasis> functions using the <link linkend="bind">
860         bind
861       </link>
862       command.  For example, to make the <emphasis>Delete</emphasis> key
863       delete the character in
864       front of the cursor rather than under, you could use
865     </para>
866     
867     <para>
868       <literal>bind editor &lt;delete&gt; backspace</literal>
869     </para>
870     
871     <para>
872       
873     </para>
874     
875   </sect1>
876     <!--}}}-->
877   
878   <sect1>
879     <title>Reading Mail - The Index and Pager  </title> <!--{{{-->
880     
881     <para>
882       Similar to many other mail clients, there are two modes in which mail
883       isread in Mutt-ng.  The first is the index of messages in the mailbox,
884       which is
885       called the ``index'' in Mutt-ng.  The second mode is the display of the
886       message contents.  This is called the ``pager.''
887     </para>
888     
889     <para>
890       The next few sections describe the functions provided in each of these
891       modes.
892     </para>
893     
894     <sect2>
895       <title>The Message Index</title> <!--{{{-->
896       
897       <para>
898
899       <table>
900         <title>Default Index Menu Bindings</title>
901         <tgroup cols="3" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
902         <thead>
903           <row>
904             <entry>Key</entry>
905             <entry>Function</entry>
906             <entry>Description</entry>
907           </row>
908         </thead>
909         <tbody>
910           <row><entry><code>c      </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>change to a different mailbox</entry></row>
911           <row><entry><code>ESC c    </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>change to a folder in read-only mode</entry></row>
912           <row><entry><code>C        </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>copy the current message to another mailbox</entry></row>
913           <row><entry><code>ESC C     </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>decode a message and copy it to a folder</entry></row>
914           <row><entry><code>ESC s    </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>decode a message and save it to a folder</entry></row>
915           <row><entry><code>D       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>delete messages matching a pattern</entry></row>
916           <row><entry><code>d     </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>delete the current message</entry></row>
917           <row><entry><code>F      </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>mark as important</entry></row>
918           <row><entry><code>l      </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>show messages matching a pattern</entry></row>
919           <row><entry><code>N       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>mark message as new</entry></row>
920           <row><entry><code>o       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>change the current sort method</entry></row>
921           <row><entry><code>O       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>reverse sort the mailbox</entry></row>
922           <row><entry><code>q       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>save changes and exit</entry></row>
923           <row><entry><code>s        </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>save-message</entry></row>
924           <row><entry><code>T       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>tag messages matching a pattern</entry></row>
925           <row><entry><code>t       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>toggle the tag on a message</entry></row>
926           <row><entry><code>ESC t  </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>toggle tag on entire message thread</entry></row>
927           <row><entry><code>U       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>undelete messages matching a pattern</entry></row>
928           <row><entry><code>u        </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>undelete-message</entry></row>
929           <row><entry><code>v        </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>view-attachments</entry></row>
930           <row><entry><code>x       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>abort changes and exit</entry></row>
931           <row><entry><code>&#60;Return&#62;  </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>display-message</entry></row>
932           <row><entry><code>&#60;Tab&#62;      </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>jump to the next new message</entry></row>
933           <row><entry><code>@      </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>show the author's full e-mail address</entry></row>
934           <row><entry><code>$       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>save changes to mailbox</entry></row>
935           <row><entry><code>/       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>search</entry></row>
936           <row><entry><code>ESC /     </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>search-reverse</entry></row>
937           <row><entry><code>^L       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>clear and redraw the screen</entry></row>
938           <row><entry><code>^T        </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>untag messages matching a pattern</entry></row>
939         </tbody>
940       </tgroup>
941     </table>
942
943       </para>
944       
945       <sect3>
946         <title>Status Flags</title> <!--{{{-->
947         
948         <para>
949           In addition to who sent the message and the subject, a short
950           summary of
951           the disposition of each message is printed beside the message
952           number.
953           Zero or more of the following ``flags'' may appear, which mean:
954         </para>
955         
956         <para>
957
958           <variablelist>
959             
960             <varlistentry>
961               <term>D</term>
962               <listitem>
963                 <para>
964                   message is deleted (is marked for deletion)
965                 </para>
966               </listitem>
967             </varlistentry>
968             <varlistentry>
969               <term>d</term>
970               <listitem>
971                 <para>
972                   message have attachments marked for deletion
973                 </para>
974               </listitem>
975             </varlistentry>
976             <varlistentry>
977               <term>K</term>
978               <listitem>
979                 <para>
980                   contains a PGP public key
981                 </para>
982               </listitem>
983             </varlistentry>
984             <varlistentry>
985               <term>N</term>
986               <listitem>
987                 <para>
988                   message is new
989                 </para>
990               </listitem>
991             </varlistentry>
992             <varlistentry>
993               <term>O</term>
994               <listitem>
995                 <para>
996                   message is old
997                 </para>
998               </listitem>
999             </varlistentry>
1000             <varlistentry>
1001               <term>P</term>
1002               <listitem>
1003                 <para>
1004                   message is PGP encrypted
1005                 </para>
1006               </listitem>
1007             </varlistentry>
1008             <varlistentry>
1009               <term>r</term>
1010               <listitem>
1011                 <para>
1012                   message has been replied to
1013                 </para>
1014               </listitem>
1015             </varlistentry>
1016             <varlistentry>
1017               <term>S</term>
1018               <listitem>
1019                 <para>
1020                   message is signed, and the signature is succesfully
1021                   verified
1022                 </para>
1023               </listitem>
1024             </varlistentry>
1025             <varlistentry>
1026               <term>s</term>
1027               <listitem>
1028                 <para>
1029                   message is signed
1030                 </para>
1031               </listitem>
1032             </varlistentry>
1033             <varlistentry>
1034               <term>!</term>
1035               <listitem>
1036                 <para>
1037                   message is flagged
1038                 </para>
1039               </listitem>
1040             </varlistentry>
1041             <varlistentry>
1042               <term>*</term>
1043               <listitem>
1044                 <para>
1045                   message is tagged
1046                 </para>
1047               </listitem>
1048             </varlistentry>
1049           </variablelist>
1050         </para>
1051         
1052         <para>
1053           Some of the status flags can be turned on or off using
1054           
1055           <itemizedlist>
1056             <listitem>
1057               
1058               <para>
1059                 <emphasis role="bold">set-flag</emphasis> (default: w)
1060               </para>
1061             </listitem>
1062             <listitem>
1063               
1064               <para>
1065                 <emphasis role="bold">clear-flag</emphasis> (default: W)
1066               </para>
1067             </listitem>
1068             
1069           </itemizedlist>
1070           
1071         </para>
1072         
1073         <para>
1074           Furthermore, the following flags reflect who the message is
1075           addressed
1076           to.  They can be customized with the
1077           <link linkend="to-chars">&dollar;to&lowbar;chars</link> variable.
1078         </para>
1079         
1080         <para>
1081           <variablelist>
1082             
1083             <varlistentry>
1084               <term>+</term>
1085               <listitem>
1086                 <para>
1087                   message is to you and you only
1088                 </para>
1089               </listitem>
1090             </varlistentry>
1091             <varlistentry>
1092               <term>T</term>
1093               <listitem>
1094                 <para>
1095                   message is to you, but also to or cc'ed to others
1096                 </para>
1097               </listitem>
1098             </varlistentry>
1099             <varlistentry>
1100               <term>C</term>
1101               <listitem>
1102                 <para>
1103                   message is cc'ed to you
1104                 </para>
1105               </listitem>
1106             </varlistentry>
1107             <varlistentry>
1108               <term>F</term>
1109               <listitem>
1110                 <para>
1111                   message is from you
1112                 </para>
1113               </listitem>
1114             </varlistentry>
1115             <varlistentry>
1116               <term>L</term>
1117               <listitem>
1118                 <para>
1119                   message is sent to a subscribed mailing list
1120                 </para>
1121               </listitem>
1122             </varlistentry>
1123           </variablelist>
1124         </para>
1125         
1126         <!--}}}-->
1127       </sect3>
1128       
1129       <!--}}}-->
1130     </sect2>
1131     
1132     <sect2>
1133       <title>The Pager</title> <!--{{{-->
1134       
1135       <para>
1136         By default, Mutt-ng uses its builtin pager to display the body of
1137         messages.
1138         The pager is very similar to the Unix program <emphasis>less</emphasis> though not nearly as
1139         featureful.
1140       </para>
1141       
1142       <para>
1143
1144       <table>
1145         <title>Default Pager Menu Bindings</title>
1146         <tgroup cols="3" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
1147         <thead>
1148           <row>
1149             <entry>Key</entry>
1150             <entry>Function</entry>
1151             <entry>Description</entry>
1152           </row>
1153         </thead>
1154         <tbody>
1155           <row><entry><code>&#60;Return&#62;   </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>go down one line</entry></row>
1156           <row><entry><code>&#60;Space&#62;   </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>display the next page (or next message if at the end of a message)</entry></row>
1157           <row><entry><code>-           </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>go back to the previous page</entry></row>
1158           <row><entry><code>n            </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>search for next match</entry></row>
1159           <row><entry><code>S         </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>skip beyond quoted text</entry></row>
1160           <row><entry><code>T         </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>toggle display of quoted text</entry></row>
1161           <row><entry><code>?        </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>show key bindings</entry></row>
1162           <row><entry><code>/        </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>search for a regular expression (pattern)</entry></row>
1163           <row><entry><code>ESC /   </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>search backwards for a regular expression</entry></row>
1164           <row><entry><code>\       </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>toggle search pattern coloring</entry></row>
1165           <row><entry><code>^      </code></entry><entry><code></code></entry><entry>jump to the top of the message</entry></row>
1166         </tbody>
1167       </tgroup>
1168     </table>
1169
1170
1171       </para>
1172       
1173       <para>
1174         In addition, many of the functions from the <emphasis>index</emphasis> are available in
1175         the pager, such as <emphasis>delete-message</emphasis> or <emphasis>
1176           copy-message
1177         </emphasis>
1178         (this is one
1179         advantage over using an external pager to view messages).
1180       </para>
1181       
1182       <para>
1183         Also, the internal pager supports a couple other advanced features.
1184         For
1185         one, it will accept and translate the ``standard'' nroff sequences
1186         forbold and underline. These sequences are a series of either the
1187         letter,
1188         backspace (&circ;H), the letter again for bold or the letter,
1189         backspace,
1190         ``&lowbar;'' for denoting underline. Mutt-ng will attempt to display
1191         these
1192         in bold and underline respectively if your terminal supports them. If
1193         not, you can use the bold and underline <link
1194 linkend="color">color</link>
1195         objects to specify a color or mono attribute for them.
1196       </para>
1197       
1198       <para>
1199         Additionally, the internal pager supports the ANSI escape
1200         sequences for character attributes.  Mutt-ng translates them
1201         into the correct color and character settings.  The sequences
1202         Mutt-ng supports are: <literal>ESC [ Ps;Ps;Ps;...;Ps
1203           m</literal> (see table below for possible values for
1204         <code>Ps</code>).
1205       </para>
1206       
1207       <para>
1208
1209       <table>
1210         <title>ANSI Escape Sequences</title>
1211         <tgroup cols="2" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
1212         <thead>
1213           <row>
1214             <entry>Value</entry>
1215             <entry>Attribute</entry>
1216           </row>
1217         </thead>
1218         <tbody>
1219           <row><entry><code>0  </code></entry><entry>All Attributes Off</entry></row>
1220           <row><entry><code>1  </code></entry><entry>Bold on</entry></row>
1221           <row><entry><code>4  </code></entry><entry>Underline on</entry></row>
1222           <row><entry><code>5  </code></entry><entry>Blink on</entry></row>
1223           <row><entry><code>7 </code></entry><entry>Reverse video on</entry></row>
1224           <row><entry><code>3x  </code></entry><entry>Foreground color is x (see table below)</entry></row>
1225           <row><entry><code>4x </code></entry><entry>Background color is x (see table below)</entry></row>
1226         </tbody>
1227       </tgroup>
1228     </table>
1229
1230     
1231       <table>
1232         <title>ANSI Colors</title>
1233         <tgroup cols="2" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
1234         <thead>
1235           <row>
1236             <entry>Number</entry>
1237             <entry>Color</entry>
1238           </row>
1239         </thead>
1240         <tbody>
1241           <row><entry><code>0   </code></entry><entry>black</entry></row>
1242           <row><entry><code>1  </code></entry><entry>red</entry></row>
1243           <row><entry><code>2  </code></entry><entry>green</entry></row>
1244           <row><entry><code>3  </code></entry><entry>yellow</entry></row>
1245           <row><entry><code>4  </code></entry><entry>blue</entry></row>
1246           <row><entry><code>5 </code></entry><entry>magenta</entry></row>
1247           <row><entry><code>6  </code></entry><entry>cyan</entry></row>
1248           <row><entry><code>7 </code></entry><entry>white</entry></row>
1249         </tbody>
1250       </tgroup>
1251     </table>
1252
1253
1254         </para>
1255         
1256         <para>
1257           Mutt-ng uses these attributes for handling text/enriched messages,
1258           and they
1259           can also be used by an external <link
1260   linkend="auto-view">autoview</link>
1261           script for highlighting purposes.  <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> If you change the colors for your
1262           display, for example by changing the color associated with color2 for
1263           your xterm, then that color will be used instead of green.
1264         </para>
1265         
1266         <!--}}}-->
1267       </sect2>
1268       
1269       <sect2 id="threads">
1270         <title>Threaded Mode</title> <!--{{{-->
1271         
1272         <para>
1273           When the mailbox is <link linkend="sort">sorted</link> by <emphasis>
1274             threads
1275           </emphasis>
1276           ,there are
1277           a few additional functions available in the <emphasis>index</emphasis> and <emphasis>
1278             pager
1279           </emphasis>
1280           modes.
1281         </para>
1282         
1283         <para>
1284
1285         <table>
1286           <title>Default Thread Function Bindings</title>
1287           <tgroup cols="3" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
1288           <thead>
1289             <row>
1290               <entry>Key</entry>
1291               <entry>Function</entry>
1292               <entry>Description</entry>
1293             </row>
1294           </thead>
1295           <tbody>
1296             <row><entry><code>^D   </code></entry><entry><code>delete-thread       </code></entry><entry>delete all messages in the current  thread</entry></row>
1297             <row><entry><code>^U   </code></entry><entry><code>undelete-thread     </code></entry><entry>undelete all messages in the current thread</entry></row>
1298             <row><entry><code>^N   </code></entry><entry><code>next-thread         </code></entry><entry>jump to the start of the next thread</entry></row>
1299             <row><entry><code>^P   </code></entry><entry><code>previous-thread     </code></entry><entry>jump to the start of the previous thread</entry></row>
1300             <row><entry><code>^R    </code></entry><entry><code>read-thread         </code></entry><entry>mark the current thread as read</entry></row>
1301             <row><entry><code>ESC d </code></entry><entry><code>delete-subthread    </code></entry><entry>delete all messages in the current subthread</entry></row>
1302             <row><entry><code>ESC u </code></entry><entry><code>undelete-subthread  </code></entry><entry>undelete all messages in the current subthread</entry></row>
1303             <row><entry><code>ESC n </code></entry><entry><code>next-subthread      </code></entry><entry>jump to the start of the next subthread</entry></row>
1304             <row><entry><code>ESC p </code></entry><entry><code>previous-subthread  </code></entry><entry>jump to the start of the previous subthread</entry></row>
1305             <row><entry><code>ESC r </code></entry><entry><code>read-subthread      </code></entry><entry>mark the current subthread as read </entry></row>
1306             <row><entry><code>ESC t </code></entry><entry><code>tag-thread          </code></entry><entry>toggle the tag on the current thread</entry></row>
1307             <row><entry><code>ESC v </code></entry><entry><code>collapse-thread    </code></entry><entry>toggle collapse for the current thread</entry></row>
1308             <row><entry><code>ESC V </code></entry><entry><code>collapse-all      </code></entry><entry>toggle collapse for all threads</entry></row>
1309             <row><entry><code>P    </code></entry><entry><code>parent-message        </code></entry><entry>jump to parent message in thread</entry></row>
1310           </tbody>
1311         </tgroup>
1312       </table>
1313
1314           
1315         </para>
1316         
1317         <para>
1318           <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> Collapsing a thread displays
1319           only the first message
1320           in the thread and hides the others. This is useful when threads
1321           contain so many messages that you can only see a handful of threads
1322           onthe screen. See &percnt;M in <link
1323   linkend="index-format">
1324             index-format
1325           </link>
1326           .
1327           For example, you could use
1328           "&percnt;?M?(&num;&percnt;03M)&amp;(&percnt;4l)?" in <link linkend="index-format">
1329             index-format
1330           </link>
1331           to optionally
1332           display the number of hidden messages if the thread is collapsed.
1333         </para>
1334         
1335         <para>
1336           See also: <link linkend="strict-threads">strict-threads</link>.
1337         </para>
1338         
1339         <!--}}}-->
1340       </sect2>
1341       
1342       <sect2>
1343         <title>Miscellaneous Functions</title> <!--{{{-->
1344         
1345         <para>
1346           <emphasis role="bold">create-alias</emphasis><anchor id="create-alias"/>
1347            (default: a)
1348           
1349         </para>
1350         
1351         <para>
1352           Creates a new alias based upon the current message (or prompts for a
1353           new one).  Once editing is complete, an <link linkend="alias">alias</link>
1354           command is added to the file specified by the <link linkend="alias-file">
1355             alias-file
1356           </link>
1357           variable for future use. <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis>
1358           Specifying an <link linkend="alias-file">alias-file</link>
1359           does not add the aliases specified there-in, you must also <link linkend="source">
1360             source
1361           </link>
1362           the file.
1363         </para>
1364         
1365         <para>
1366           <emphasis role="bold">check-traditional-pgp</emphasis><anchor id="check-traditional-pgp"/>
1367            (default: ESC P)
1368           
1369         </para>
1370         
1371         <para>
1372           This function will search the current message for content signed or
1373           encrypted with PGP the "traditional" way, that is, without proper
1374           MIME tagging.  Technically, this function will temporarily change
1375           the MIME content types of the body parts containing PGP data; this
1376           is similar to the <link linkend="edit-type">edit-type</link>
1377           function's
1378           effect.
1379         </para>
1380         
1381         <para>
1382           <emphasis role="bold">display-toggle-weed</emphasis><anchor id="display-toggle-weed"/>
1383            (default: h)
1384           
1385         </para>
1386         
1387         <para>
1388           Toggles the weeding of message header fields specified by <link linkend="ignore">
1389             ignore
1390           </link>
1391           commands.
1392         </para>
1393         
1394         <para>
1395           <emphasis role="bold">edit</emphasis><anchor id="edit"/>
1396            (default: e)
1397           
1398         </para>
1399         
1400         <para>
1401           This command (available in the ``index'' and ``pager'') allows you to
1402           edit the raw current message as it's present in the mail folder.
1403           After you have finished editing, the changed message will be
1404           appended to the current folder, and the original message will be
1405           marked for deletion.
1406         </para>
1407         
1408         <para>
1409           <emphasis role="bold">edit-type</emphasis><anchor id="edit-type"/>
1410           
1411           (default: &circ;E on the attachment menu, and in the pager and index
1412           menus; &circ;T on the
1413           compose menu)
1414         </para>
1415         
1416         <para>
1417           This command is used to temporarily edit an attachment's content
1418           type to fix, for instance, bogus character set parameters.  When
1419           invoked from the index or from the pager, you'll have the
1420           opportunity to edit the top-level attachment's content type.  On the
1421           <link linkend="attach-menu">attach-menu</link>, you can change any
1422           attachment's content type. These changes are not persistent, and get
1423           lost upon changing folders.
1424         </para>
1425         
1426         <para>
1427           Note that this command is also available on the <link linkend="compose-menu">
1428             compose-menu
1429           </link>
1430           .There, it's used to
1431           fine-tune the properties of attachments you are going to send.
1432         </para>
1433         
1434         <para>
1435           <emphasis role="bold">enter-command</emphasis><anchor id="enter-command"/>
1436            (default: ``:'')
1437           
1438         </para>
1439         
1440         <para>
1441           This command is used to execute any command you would normally put in
1442           a
1443           configuration file.  A common use is to check the settings of
1444           variables, or
1445           in conjunction with <link linkend="macro">macro</link> to change
1446           settings on the
1447           fly.
1448         </para>
1449         
1450         <para>
1451           <emphasis role="bold">extract-keys</emphasis><anchor id="extract-keys"/>
1452            (default: &circ;K)
1453           
1454         </para>
1455         
1456         <para>
1457           This command extracts PGP public keys from the current or tagged
1458           message(s) and adds them to your PGP public key ring.
1459         </para>
1460         
1461         <para>
1462           <emphasis role="bold">forget-passphrase</emphasis><anchor id="forget-passphrase"/>
1463            (default:
1464           &circ;F)
1465           
1466         </para>
1467         
1468         <para>
1469           This command wipes the passphrase(s) from memory. It is useful, if
1470           you misspelled the passphrase.
1471         </para>
1472         
1473         <para>
1474           <emphasis role="bold">list-reply</emphasis><anchor id="func-list-reply"/>
1475            (default: L)
1476           
1477         </para>
1478         
1479         <para>
1480           Reply to the current or tagged message(s) by extracting any addresses
1481           which
1482           match the regular expressions given by the <link linkend="lists">
1483             lists
1484           </link>
1485           commands, but also honor any <literal>Mail-Followup-To</literal>
1486           header(s) if the
1487           <link linkend="honor-followup-to">honor-followup-to</link>
1488           configuration variable is set.  Using this when replying to messages
1489           posted
1490           to mailing lists helps avoid duplicate copies being sent to the
1491           author of
1492           the message you are replying to.
1493         </para>
1494         
1495         <para>
1496           <emphasis role="bold">pipe-message</emphasis><anchor id="pipe-message"/>
1497            (default: &verbar;)
1498           
1499         </para>
1500         
1501         <para>
1502           Asks for an external Unix command and pipes the current or
1503           tagged message(s) to it.  The variables <link linkend="pipe-decode">
1504             pipe-decode
1505           </link>
1506           ,<link linkend="pipe-split">pipe-split</link>, <link linkend="pipe-sep">
1507             pipe-sep
1508           </link>
1509           and <link linkend="wait-key">wait-key</link> control the exact
1510           behavior of this
1511           function.
1512         </para>
1513         
1514         <para>
1515           <emphasis role="bold">resend-message</emphasis><anchor id="resend-message"/>
1516            (default: ESC e)
1517           
1518         </para>
1519         
1520         <para>
1521           With resend-message, mutt takes the current message as a template for
1522           a
1523           new message.  This function is best described as "recall from
1524           arbitrary
1525           folders".  It can conveniently be used to forward MIME messages while
1526           preserving the original mail structure. Note that the amount of
1527           headers
1528           included here depends on the value of the <link linkend="weed">weed</link>
1529           variable.
1530         </para>
1531         
1532         <para>
1533           This function is also available from the attachment menu. You can use
1534           this
1535           to easily resend a message which was included with a bounce message
1536           as a message/rfc822 body part.
1537         </para>
1538         
1539         <para>
1540           <emphasis role="bold">shell-escape</emphasis><anchor id="shell-escape"/>
1541            (default: !)
1542           
1543         </para>
1544         
1545         <para>
1546           Asks for an external Unix command and executes it.  The <link linkend="wait-key">
1547             wait-key
1548           </link>
1549           can be used to control
1550           whether Mutt-ng will wait for a key to be pressed when the command
1551           returns
1552           (presumably to let the user read the output of the command), based on
1553           the return status of the named command.
1554         </para>
1555         
1556         <para>
1557           <emphasis role="bold">toggle-quoted</emphasis><anchor id="toggle-quoted"/>
1558            (default: T)
1559           
1560         </para>
1561         
1562         <para>
1563           The <emphasis>pager</emphasis> uses the <link linkend="quote-regexp">
1564             quote-regexp
1565           </link>
1566           variable to detect quoted text when
1567           displaying the body of the message.  This function toggles the
1568           displayof the quoted material in the message.  It is particularly
1569           useful when
1570           are interested in just the response and there is a large amount of
1571           quoted text in the way.
1572         </para>
1573         
1574         <para>
1575           <emphasis role="bold">skip-quoted</emphasis><anchor id="skip-quoted"/>
1576            (default: S)
1577           
1578         </para>
1579         
1580         <para>
1581           This function will go to the next line of non-quoted text which come
1582           after a line of quoted text in the internal pager.
1583         </para>
1584         
1585         <para>
1586           
1587         </para>
1588         
1589         <!--}}}-->
1590       </sect2>
1591       
1592       <!--}}}-->
1593     </sect1>
1594     
1595     <sect1>
1596       <title>Sending Mail  </title> <!--{{{-->
1597       
1598       <para>
1599         The following bindings are available in the <emphasis>index</emphasis>
1600         for sending
1601         messages.
1602       </para>
1603       
1604       <para>
1605
1606         <table>
1607           <title>Default Mail Composition Bindings</title>
1608           <tgroup cols="3" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
1609           <thead>
1610             <row>
1611               <entry>Key</entry>
1612               <entry>Function</entry>
1613               <entry>Description</entry>
1614             </row>
1615           </thead>
1616           <tbody>
1617             <row><entry><code>m    </code></entry><entry><code>compose    </code></entry><entry>compose a new message</entry></row>
1618             <row><entry><code>r     </code></entry><entry><code>reply       </code></entry><entry>reply to sender</entry></row>
1619             <row><entry><code>g     </code></entry><entry><code>group-reply </code></entry><entry>reply to all recipients</entry></row>
1620             <row><entry><code>L     </code></entry><entry><code>list-reply  </code></entry><entry>reply to mailing list address</entry></row>
1621             <row><entry><code>f     </code></entry><entry><code>forward     </code></entry><entry>forward message</entry></row>
1622             <row><entry><code>b     </code></entry><entry><code>bounce      </code></entry><entry>bounce (remail) message</entry></row>
1623             <row><entry><code>ESC k  </code></entry><entry><code>mail-key    </code></entry><entry>mail a PGP public key to someone</entry></row>
1624           </tbody>
1625         </tgroup>
1626       </table>
1627
1628       </para>
1629       
1630       <para>
1631         Bouncing a message sends the message as is to the recipient you
1632         specify.  Forwarding a message allows you to add comments or
1633         modify the message you are forwarding.  These items are discussed
1634         in greater detail in the next chapter <link linkend="forwarding-mail">
1635           forwarding-mail
1636         </link>
1637         .
1638       </para>
1639       
1640       <sect2>
1641         <title>Composing new messages  </title> <!--{{{-->
1642         
1643         <para>
1644           When you want to send an email using mutt-ng, simply press <literal>m</literal> on
1645           your keyboard. Then, mutt-ng asks for the recipient via a prompt in
1646           the last line:
1647         </para>
1648         
1649         <para>
1650           
1651           <screen>
1652 To:</screen>
1653           
1654         </para>
1655         
1656         <para>
1657           After you've finished entering the recipient(s), press return. If you
1658           want to send an email to more than one recipient, separate the email
1659           addresses using the comma "<literal>,</literal>". Mutt-ng then asks
1660           you for the email
1661           subject. Again, press return after you've entered it. After that,
1662           mutt-ng
1663           got the most important information from you, and starts up an editor
1664           where you can then enter your email.
1665         </para>
1666         
1667         <para>
1668           The editor that is called is selected in the following way: you
1669           can e.g. set it in the mutt-ng configuration:
1670         </para>
1671         
1672         <para>
1673           
1674           <screen>
1675 set editor = "vim +/^$/ -c ':set tw=72'"
1676 set editor = "nano"
1677 set editor = "emacs"</screen>
1678           
1679         </para>
1680         
1681         <para>
1682           If you don't set your preferred editor in your configuration, mutt-ng
1683           first looks whether the environment variable <literal>$VISUAL</literal> is set, and if
1684           so, it takes its value as editor command. Otherwise, it has a look
1685           at <literal>$EDITOR</literal> and takes its value if it is set. If no
1686           editor command
1687           can be found, mutt-ng simply assumes <literal>vi</literal> to be the
1688           default editor,
1689           since it's the most widespread editor in the Unix world and it's
1690           pretty
1691           safe to assume that it is installed and available.
1692         </para>
1693         
1694         <para>
1695           When you've finished entering your message, save it and quit your 
1696           editor. Mutt-ng will then present you with a summary screen, the
1697           compose menu. 
1698           On the top, you see a summary of the most important available key
1699           commands.
1700           Below that, you see the sender, the recipient(s), Cc and/or Bcc 
1701           recipient(s), the subject, the reply-to address, and optionally
1702           information where the sent email will be stored and whether it should
1703           be digitally signed and/or encrypted.
1704         </para>
1705         
1706         <para>
1707           Below that, you see a list of "attachments". The mail you've just
1708           entered before is also an attachment, but due to its special type
1709           (it's plain text), it will be displayed as the normal message on
1710           the receiver's side.
1711         </para>
1712         
1713         <para>
1714           At this point, you can add more attachments, pressing <literal>a</literal>, you
1715           can edit the recipient addresses, pressing <literal>t</literal> for
1716           the "To:" field,
1717           <literal>c</literal> for the "Cc:" field, and <literal>b</literal>
1718           for the "Bcc: field. You can
1719           also edit the subject the subject by simply pressing <literal>s</literal> or the
1720           email message that you've entered before by pressing <literal>e</literal>. You will
1721           then again return to the editor. You can even edit the sender, by
1722           pressing
1723           <literal>&lt;esc&gt;f</literal>, but this shall only be used with
1724           caution.
1725         </para>
1726         
1727         <para>
1728           Alternatively, you can configure mutt-ng in a way that most of the
1729           above settings can be edited using the editor. Therefore, you only
1730           need to add the following to your configuration:
1731         </para>
1732         
1733         <para>
1734           
1735           <screen>
1736 set edit_headers</screen>
1737           
1738         </para>
1739         
1740         <para>
1741           Once you have finished editing the body of your mail message, you are
1742           returned to the <emphasis>compose</emphasis> menu.  The following
1743           options are available:
1744         </para>
1745         
1746         <para>
1747
1748         <table>
1749           <title>Default Compose Menu Bindings</title>
1750           <tgroup cols="3" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
1751           <thead>
1752             <row>
1753               <entry>Key</entry>
1754               <entry>Function</entry>
1755               <entry>Description</entry>
1756             </row>
1757           </thead>
1758           <tbody>
1759             <row><entry><code>a    </code></entry><entry><code>attach-file  </code></entry><entry>attach a file</entry></row>
1760             <row><entry><code>A    </code></entry><entry><code>attach-message  </code></entry><entry>attach message(s) to the message</entry></row>
1761             <row><entry><code>ESC k  </code></entry><entry><code>attach-key       </code></entry><entry>attach a PGP public key</entry></row>
1762             <row><entry><code>d    </code></entry><entry><code>edit-description  </code></entry><entry>edit description on attachment</entry></row>
1763             <row><entry><code>D  </code></entry><entry><code>detach-file     </code></entry><entry>detach a file</entry></row>
1764             <row><entry><code>t </code></entry><entry><code>edit-to         </code></entry><entry>edit the To field</entry></row>
1765             <row><entry><code>ESC f </code></entry><entry><code>edit-from       </code></entry><entry>edit the From field</entry></row>
1766             <row><entry><code>r  </code></entry><entry><code>edit-reply-to   </code></entry><entry>edit the Reply-To field</entry></row>
1767             <row><entry><code>c </code></entry><entry><code>edit-cc         </code></entry><entry>edit the Cc field</entry></row>
1768             <row><entry><code>b      </code></entry><entry><code>edit-bcc        </code></entry><entry>edit the Bcc field</entry></row>
1769             <row><entry><code>y     </code></entry><entry><code>send-message    </code></entry><entry>send the message</entry></row>
1770             <row><entry><code>s    </code></entry><entry><code>edit-subject    </code></entry><entry>edit the Subject</entry></row>
1771             <row><entry><code>S   </code></entry><entry><code>smime-menu        </code></entry><entry>select S/MIME options</entry></row>
1772             <row><entry><code>f      </code></entry><entry><code>edit-fcc        </code></entry><entry>specify an ``Fcc'' mailbox</entry></row>
1773             <row><entry><code>p     </code></entry><entry><code>pgp-menu        </code></entry><entry>select PGP options</entry></row>
1774             <row><entry><code>P    </code></entry><entry><code>postpone-message </code></entry><entry>postpone this message until later</entry></row>
1775             <row><entry><code>q   </code></entry><entry><code>quit            </code></entry><entry>quit (abort) sending the message</entry></row>
1776             <row><entry><code>w  </code></entry><entry><code>write-fcc      </code></entry><entry>write the message to a folder</entry></row>
1777             <row><entry><code>i </code></entry><entry><code>ispell          </code></entry><entry>check spelling (if available on your system)</entry></row>
1778             <row><entry><code>^F  </code></entry><entry><code>forget-passphrase   </code></entry><entry>wipe passphrase(s) from memory</entry></row>
1779           </tbody>
1780         </tgroup>
1781       </table>
1782
1783         </para>
1784         
1785         <para>
1786           <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> The attach-message function
1787           will prompt you for a folder to
1788           attach messages from. You can now tag messages in that folder and
1789           theywill be attached to the message you are sending. Note that
1790           certainoperations like composing a new mail, replying, forwarding,
1791           etc. are
1792           not permitted when you are in that folder. The &percnt;r in <link linkend="status-format">
1793             status-format
1794           </link>
1795           will change to
1796           a 'A' to indicate that you are in attach-message mode.
1797         </para>
1798         
1799         <para>
1800           
1801         </para>
1802         
1803         <!--}}}-->
1804       </sect2>
1805       
1806       <sect2>
1807         <title>Replying      </title> <!--{{{-->
1808         
1809         <sect3>
1810           <title>Simple Replies       </title> <!--{{{-->
1811           
1812           <para>
1813             When you want to reply to an email message, select it in the index
1814             menu and then press <literal>r</literal>. Mutt-ng's behaviour is
1815             then similar to the 
1816             behaviour when you compose a message: first, you will be asked for
1817             the recipient, then for the subject, and then, mutt-ng will start
1818             the editor with the quote attribution and the quoted message. This
1819             can e.g. look like the example below.
1820           </para>
1821           
1822           <para>
1823             
1824             <screen>
1825 On Mon, Mar 07, 2005 at 05:02:12PM +0100, Michael Svensson wrote:
1826 &gt; Bill, can you please send last month's progress report to Mr. 
1827 &gt; Morgan? We also urgently need the cost estimation for the new 
1828 &gt; production server that we want to set up before our customer's 
1829 &gt; project will go live.</screen>
1830             
1831           </para>
1832           
1833           <para>
1834             You can start editing the email message. It is strongly
1835             recommended to put your answer <emphasis>below</emphasis> the
1836             quoted text and to
1837             only quote what is really necessary and that you refer to. Putting
1838             your answer on top of the quoted message, is, although very
1839             widespread, very often not considered to be a polite way to answer
1840             emails.
1841           </para>
1842           
1843           <para>
1844             The quote attribution is configurable, by default it is set to
1845             
1846             <screen>
1847 set attribution = "On %d, %n wrote:"</screen>
1848             
1849           </para>
1850           
1851           <para>
1852             It can also be set to something more compact, e.g.
1853             
1854             <screen>
1855 set attribution = "attribution="* %n &lt;%a&gt; [%(%y-%m-%d %H:%M)]:"</screen>
1856             
1857           </para>
1858           
1859           <para>
1860             The example above results in the following attribution:
1861             
1862             <screen>
1863 * Michael Svensson &lt;svensson@foobar.com&gt; [05-03-06 17:02]:
1864 &gt; Bill, can you please send last month's progress report to Mr. 
1865 &gt; Morgan? We also urgently need the cost estimation for the new 
1866 &gt; production server that we want to set up before our customer's 
1867 &gt; project will go live.</screen>
1868             
1869           </para>
1870           
1871           <para>
1872             Generally, try to keep your attribution short yet
1873             information-rich. It is <emphasis>not</emphasis> the right place
1874             for witty quotes,
1875             long "attribution" novels or anything like that: the right place
1876             for such things is - if at all - the email signature at the very
1877             bottom of the message.
1878           </para>
1879           
1880           <para>
1881             When you're done with writing your message, save and quit the
1882             editor. As before, you will return to the compose menu, which is
1883             used in the same way as before.
1884           </para>
1885           
1886           <para>
1887             
1888           </para>
1889           
1890           <!--}}}-->
1891         </sect3>
1892         
1893         <sect3>
1894           <title>Group Replies      </title> <!--{{{-->
1895           
1896           <para>
1897             In the situation where a group of people uses email as a
1898             discussion, most of the emails will have one or more recipients,
1899             and probably several "Cc:" recipients. The group reply
1900             functionalityensures that when you press <literal>g</literal>
1901             instead of <literal>r</literal> to do a reply,
1902             each and every recipient that is contained in the original message
1903             will receive a copy of the message, either as normal recipient or
1904             as "Cc:" recipient.
1905           </para>
1906           
1907           <para>
1908             
1909           </para>
1910           
1911           <!--}}}-->
1912         </sect3>
1913         
1914         <sect3>
1915           <title>List Replies      </title> <!--{{{-->
1916           
1917           <para>
1918             When you use mailing lists, it's generally better to send your
1919             reply to a message only to the list instead of the list and the
1920             original author. To make this easy to use, mutt-ng features list
1921             replies.
1922           </para>
1923           
1924           <para>
1925             To do a list reply, simply press <literal>L</literal>. If the email
1926             contains
1927             a <literal>Mail-Followup-To:</literal> header, its value will be
1928             used as reply
1929             address. Otherwise, mutt-ng searches through all mail addresses in
1930             the original message and tries to match them a list of regular
1931             expressions which can be specified using the <literal>lists</literal> command. 
1932             If any of the regular expression matches, a mailing
1933             list address has been found, and it will be used as reply address.
1934           </para>
1935           
1936           <para>
1937             
1938             <screen>
1939 lists linuxevent@luga\.at vuln-dev@ mutt-ng-users@</screen>
1940             
1941           </para>
1942           
1943           <para>
1944             Nowadays, most mailing list software like GNU Mailman adds a
1945             <literal>Mail-Followup-To:</literal> header to their emails anyway,
1946             so setting
1947             <literal>lists</literal> is hardly ever necessary in practice.
1948           </para>
1949           
1950           <para>
1951             
1952           </para>
1953           
1954           <para>
1955             
1956           </para>
1957           
1958           <!--}}}-->
1959         </sect3>
1960         
1961         <!--}}}-->
1962       </sect2>
1963       
1964       <sect2>
1965         <title>Editing the message header  </title>
1966         
1967         <para>
1968           When editing the header of your outgoing message, there are a couple
1969           of
1970           special features available.
1971         </para>
1972         
1973         <para>
1974           If you specify
1975           
1976           <literal>Fcc:</literal> <emphasis>filename</emphasis>
1977           
1978           Mutt-ng will pick up <emphasis>filename</emphasis>
1979           just as if you had used the <emphasis>edit-fcc</emphasis> function in
1980           the <emphasis>compose</emphasis> menu.
1981         </para>
1982         
1983         <para>
1984           You can also attach files to your message by specifying
1985           
1986           <literal>Attach:</literal> <emphasis>filename</emphasis>  &lsqb; <emphasis>
1987             description
1988           </emphasis>
1989           &rsqb;
1990           
1991           where <emphasis>filename</emphasis> is the file to attach and <emphasis>
1992             description
1993           </emphasis>
1994           is an
1995           optional string to use as the description of the attached file.
1996         </para>
1997         
1998         <para>
1999           When replying to messages, if you remove the <emphasis>In-Reply-To:</emphasis> field from
2000           the header field, Mutt-ng will not generate a <emphasis>References:</emphasis> field, which
2001           allows you to create a new message thread.
2002         </para>
2003         
2004         <para>
2005           Also see <link linkend="edit-headers">edit-headers</link>.
2006         </para>
2007         
2008         <para>
2009           
2010         </para>
2011         
2012       </sect2>
2013       
2014       <sect2>
2015         <title>Using Mutt-ng with PGP  </title>
2016         
2017         <para>
2018           If you want to use PGP, you can specify 
2019         </para>
2020         
2021         <para>
2022           <literal>Pgp:</literal> &lsqb; <literal>E</literal> &verbar; <literal>
2023             S
2024           </literal>
2025           &verbar; <literal>S</literal><emphasis>&lt;id&gt;</emphasis> &rsqb; 
2026           
2027         </para>
2028         
2029         <para>
2030           ``E'' encrypts, ``S'' signs and
2031           ``S&lt;id&gt;'' signs with the given key, setting <link linkend="pgp-sign-as">
2032             pgp-sign-as
2033           </link>
2034           permanently.
2035         </para>
2036         
2037         <para>
2038           If you have told mutt to PGP encrypt a message, it will guide you
2039           through a key selection process when you try to send the message.
2040           Mutt-ng will not ask you any questions about keys which have a
2041           certified user ID matching one of the message recipients' mail
2042           addresses.  However, there may be situations in which there are
2043           several keys, weakly certified user ID fields, or where no matching
2044           keys can be found.
2045         </para>
2046         
2047         <para>
2048           In these cases, you are dropped into a menu with a list of keys from
2049           which you can select one.  When you quit this menu, or mutt can't
2050           find any matching keys, you are prompted for a user ID.  You can, as
2051           usually, abort this prompt using <literal>&circ;G</literal>.  When
2052           you do so, mutt will
2053           return to the compose screen.
2054         </para>
2055         
2056         <para>
2057           Once you have successfully finished the key selection, the message
2058           will be encrypted using the selected public keys, and sent out.
2059         </para>
2060         
2061         <para>
2062           Most fields of the entries in the key selection menu (see also <link linkend="pgp-entry-format">
2063             pgp-entry-format
2064           </link>
2065           )
2066           have obvious meanings.  But some explanations on the capabilities,
2067           flags, 
2068           and validity fields are in order.
2069         </para>
2070         
2071         <para>
2072           The flags sequence (&percnt;f) will expand to one of the following
2073           flags:
2074
2075
2076         <table>
2077           <title>PGP Key Menu Flags</title>
2078           <tgroup cols="2" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
2079           <thead>
2080             <row>
2081               <entry>Flag</entry>
2082               <entry>Description</entry>
2083             </row>
2084           </thead>
2085           <tbody>
2086             <row><entry><code>R      </code></entry><entry>The key has been revoked and can't be used.</entry></row>
2087             <row><entry><code>X     </code></entry><entry>The key is expired and can't be used.</entry></row>
2088             <row><entry><code>d     </code></entry><entry>You have marked the key as disabled.</entry></row>
2089             <row><entry><code>c     </code></entry><entry>There are unknown critical self-signature packets.</entry></row>
2090           </tbody>
2091         </tgroup>
2092       </table>
2093
2094         </para>
2095         
2096         <para>
2097           The capabilities field (&percnt;c) expands to a two-character
2098           sequencerepresenting a key's capabilities.  The first character gives
2099           the key's encryption capabilities: A minus sign (<emphasis role="bold">
2100             -
2101           </emphasis>
2102           )means 
2103           that the key cannot be used for encryption.  A dot (<emphasis role="bold">
2104             .
2105           </emphasis>
2106           )means that
2107           it's marked as a signature key in one of the user IDs, but may 
2108           also be used for encryption.  The letter <emphasis role="bold">e</emphasis> indicates that 
2109           this key can be used for encryption.
2110         </para>
2111         
2112         <para>
2113           The second character indicates the key's signing capabilities.  Once 
2114           again, a ``<emphasis role="bold">-</emphasis>'' implies ``not for
2115           signing'', ``<emphasis role="bold">.</emphasis>'' implies
2116           that the key is marked as an encryption key in one of the user-ids,
2117           and
2118           ``<emphasis role="bold">s</emphasis>'' denotes a key which can be
2119           used for signing.
2120         </para>
2121         
2122         <para>
2123           Finally, the validity field (&percnt;t) indicates how well-certified
2124           a user-id
2125           is.  A question mark (<emphasis role="bold">?</emphasis>) indicates
2126           undefined validity, a minus 
2127           character (<emphasis role="bold">-</emphasis>) marks an untrusted
2128           association, a space character 
2129           means a partially trusted association, and a plus character (<emphasis role="bold">
2130             +
2131           </emphasis>
2132           )
2133           indicates complete validity.
2134         </para>
2135         
2136         <para>
2137           
2138         </para>
2139         
2140       </sect2>
2141       
2142       <sect2>
2143         <title>Sending anonymous messages via mixmaster  </title>
2144         
2145         <para>
2146           You may also have configured mutt to co-operate with Mixmaster, an
2147           anonymous remailer.  Mixmaster permits you to send your messages
2148           anonymously using a chain of remailers. Mixmaster support in mutt is
2149           for 
2150           mixmaster version 2.04 (beta 45 appears to be the latest) and 2.03. 
2151           It does not support earlier versions or the later so-called version 3
2152           betas, 
2153           of which the latest appears to be called 2.9b23.
2154         </para>
2155         
2156         <para>
2157           To use it, you'll have to obey certain restrictions.  Most
2158           important, you cannot use the <literal>Cc</literal> and <literal>Bcc</literal> headers.  To tell
2159           Mutt-ng to use mixmaster, you have to select a remailer chain, using
2160           the mix function on the compose menu.  
2161         </para>
2162         
2163         <para>
2164           The chain selection screen is divided into two parts.  In the
2165           (larger) upper part, you get a list of remailers you may use.  In
2166           the lower part, you see the currently selected chain of remailers.
2167         </para>
2168         
2169         <para>
2170           You can navigate in the chain using the <literal>chain-prev</literal>
2171           and
2172           <literal>chain-next</literal> functions, which are by default bound
2173           to the left
2174           and right arrows and to the <literal>h</literal> and <literal>l</literal> keys (think vi
2175           keyboard bindings).  To insert a remailer at the current chain
2176           position, use the <literal>insert</literal> function.  To append a
2177           remailer behind
2178           the current chain position, use <literal>select-entry</literal> or <literal>
2179             append
2180           </literal>
2181           .
2182           You can also delete entries from the chain, using the corresponding
2183           function.  Finally, to abandon your changes, leave the menu, or
2184           <literal>accept</literal> them pressing (by default) the <literal>
2185             Return
2186           </literal>
2187           key.
2188         </para>
2189         
2190         <para>
2191           Note that different remailers do have different capabilities,
2192           indicated in the &percnt;c entry of the remailer menu lines (see
2193           <link linkend="mix-entry-format">mix-entry-format</link>).  Most
2194           important is
2195           the ``middleman'' capability, indicated by a capital ``M'': This
2196           means that the remailer in question cannot be used as the final
2197           element of a chain, but will only forward messages to other
2198           mixmaster remailers.  For details on the other capabilities, please
2199           have a look at the mixmaster documentation.
2200         </para>
2201         
2202         <para>
2203           
2204         </para>
2205         
2206         <para>
2207           
2208         </para>
2209         
2210       </sect2>
2211       
2212     </sect1>
2213     
2214     <sect1 id="forwarding-mail">
2215       <title>Forwarding and Bouncing Mail  </title>
2216       
2217       <para>
2218         Often, it is necessary to forward mails to other people.
2219         Therefore, mutt-ng supports forwarding messages in two different
2220         ways.
2221       </para>
2222       
2223       <para>
2224         The first one is regular forwarding, as you probably know it from
2225         other mail clients. You simply press <literal>f</literal>, enter the
2226         recipient
2227         email address, the subject of the forwarded email, and then you can
2228         edit the message to be forwarded in the editor. The forwarded
2229         message is separated from the rest of the message via the two
2230         following markers:
2231       </para>
2232       
2233       <para>
2234         
2235         <screen>
2236 ----- Forwarded message from Lucas User &#60;luser@example.com&#62; -----
2237
2238 From: Lucas User &#60;luser@example.com&#62;
2239 Date: Thu, 02 Dec 2004 03:08:34 +0100
2240 To: Michael Random &#60;mrandom@example.com&#62;
2241 Subject: Re: blackmail
2242
2243 Pay me EUR 50,000.- cash or your favorite stuffed animal will die
2244 a horrible death.
2245
2246 ----- End forwarded message -----</screen>
2247         
2248       </para>
2249       
2250       <para>
2251         When you're done with editing the mail, save and quit the editor,
2252         and you will return to the compose menu, the same menu you also
2253         encounter when composing or replying to mails.
2254       </para>
2255       
2256       <para>
2257         The second mode of forwarding emails with mutt-ng is the
2258         so-called <emphasis>bouncing</emphasis>: when you bounce an email to
2259         another
2260         address, it will be sent in practically the same format you send it
2261         (except for headers that are created during transporting the
2262         message). To bounce a message, press <literal>b</literal> and enter the
2263         recipient
2264         email address. By default, you are then asked whether you really
2265         want to bounce the message to the specified recipient. If you answer
2266         with yes, the message will then be bounced.
2267       </para>
2268       
2269       <para>
2270         To the recipient, the bounced email will look as if he got it
2271         like a regular email where he was <literal>Bcc:</literal> recipient.
2272         The only
2273         possibility to find out whether it was a bounced email is to
2274         carefully study the email headers and to find out which host really
2275         sent the email.
2276       </para>
2277       
2278       <para>
2279         
2280       </para>
2281       
2282     </sect1>
2283     
2284     <sect1 id="postponing-mail">
2285       <title>Postponing Mail  </title>
2286       
2287       <para>
2288         At times it is desirable to delay sending a message that you have
2289         already begun to compose.  When the <emphasis>postpone-message</emphasis> function is
2290         used in the <emphasis>compose</emphasis> menu, the body of your message
2291         and attachments
2292         are stored in the mailbox specified by the <link linkend="postponed">
2293           postponed
2294         </link>
2295         variable.  This means that you can recall the
2296         message even if you exit Mutt-ng and then restart it at a later time.
2297       </para>
2298       
2299       <para>
2300         Once a message is postponed, there are several ways to resume it.  From
2301         the
2302         command line you can use the ``-p'' option, or if you <emphasis>compose</emphasis> a new
2303         message from the <emphasis>index</emphasis> or <emphasis>pager</emphasis> you will be prompted if postponed
2304         messages exist.  If multiple messages are currently postponed, the
2305         <emphasis>postponed</emphasis> menu will pop up and you can select
2306         which message you would
2307         like to resume.
2308       </para>
2309       
2310       <para>
2311         <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> If you postpone a reply to a
2312         message, the reply setting of
2313         the message is only updated when you actually finish the message and
2314         send it.  Also, you must be in the same folder with the message you
2315         replied to for the status of the message to be updated.
2316       </para>
2317       
2318       <para>
2319         See also the <link linkend="postpone">postpone</link> quad-option.
2320       </para>
2321       
2322       <para>
2323         
2324       </para>
2325       
2326       <para>
2327         
2328       </para>
2329       
2330     </sect1>
2331     
2332   </chapter>
2333   
2334   <chapter>
2335     <title>Configuration  </title>
2336     
2337     <sect1>
2338       <title>Locations of Configuration Files  </title>
2339       
2340       <para>
2341         While the default configuration (or ``preferences'') make Mutt-ng
2342         usable right out
2343         of the box, it is often desirable to tailor Mutt-ng to suit your own
2344         tastes. When
2345         Mutt-ng is first invoked, it will attempt to read the ``system''
2346         configuration
2347         file (defaults set by your local system administrator), unless the
2348         ``-n'' <link linkend="commandline">commandline</link> option is
2349         specified.  This file is
2350         typically <literal>/usr/local/share/muttng/Muttngrc</literal> or <literal>
2351           /etc/Muttngrc
2352         </literal>
2353         ,
2354         Mutt-ng users will find this file in <literal>
2355           /usr/local/share/muttng/Muttrc
2356         </literal>
2357         or
2358         <literal>/etc/Muttngrc</literal>. Mutt will next look for a file named <literal>
2359           .muttrc
2360         </literal>
2361         in your home directory, Mutt-ng will look for <literal>.muttngrc</literal>.  If this file
2362         does not exist and your home directory has a subdirectory named <literal>
2363           .mutt
2364         </literal>
2365         ,
2366         mutt try to load a file named <literal>.muttng/muttngrc</literal>. 
2367       </para>
2368       
2369       <para>
2370         <literal>.muttrc</literal> (or <literal>.muttngrc</literal> for
2371         Mutt-ng) is the file where you will
2372         usually place your <link linkend="commands">commands</link> to
2373         configure Mutt-ng.
2374       </para>
2375       
2376       <para>
2377         
2378       </para>
2379       
2380     </sect1>
2381     
2382     <sect1 id="muttrc-syntax">
2383       <title>Basic Syntax of Initialization Files  </title>
2384       
2385       <para>
2386         An initialization file consists of a series of <link linkend="commands">
2387           commands
2388         </link>
2389         .Each line of the file may contain one or more commands.
2390         When multiple commands are used, they must be separated by a semicolon
2391         (;).
2392         
2393         <screen>
2394 set realname='Mutt-ng user' ; ignore x-</screen>
2395         
2396         The hash mark, or pound sign
2397         (``&num;''), is used as a ``comment'' character. You can use it to
2398         annotate your initialization file. All text after the comment character
2399         to the end of the line is ignored. For example,
2400       </para>
2401       
2402       <para>
2403         
2404         <screen>
2405 my_hdr X-Disclaimer: Why are you listening to me? &num; This is a comment</screen>
2406         
2407       </para>
2408       
2409       <para>
2410         Single quotes (') and double quotes (&quot;) can be used to quote
2411         strings
2412         which contain spaces or other special characters.  The difference
2413         between
2414         the two types of quotes is similar to that of many popular shell
2415         programs,
2416         namely that a single quote is used to specify a literal string (one
2417         that is
2418         not interpreted for shell variables or quoting with a backslash
2419         &lsqb;see
2420         next paragraph&rsqb;), while double quotes indicate a string for which
2421         should be evaluated.  For example, backtics are evaluated inside of
2422         double
2423         quotes, but <emphasis role="bold">not</emphasis> for single quotes.
2424       </para>
2425       
2426       <para>
2427         &bsol; quotes the next character, just as in shells such as bash and
2428         zsh.
2429         For example, if want to put quotes ``&quot;'' inside of a string, you
2430         can use
2431         ``&bsol;'' to force the next character to be a literal instead of
2432         interpreted
2433         character.
2434         
2435         <screen>
2436 set realname="Michael \"MuttDude\" Elkins"</screen>
2437         
2438       </para>
2439       
2440       <para>
2441         ``&bsol;&bsol;'' means to insert a literal ``&bsol;'' into the line.
2442         ``&bsol;n'' and ``&bsol;r'' have their usual C meanings of linefeed and
2443         carriage-return, respectively.
2444       </para>
2445       
2446       <para>
2447         A &bsol; at the end of a line can be used to split commands over
2448         multiple lines, provided that the split points don't appear in the
2449         middle of command names.
2450       </para>
2451       
2452       <para>
2453         Please note that, unlike the various shells, mutt-ng interprets a
2454         ``&bsol;''
2455         at the end of a line also in comments. This allows you to disable a
2456         command
2457         split over multiple lines with only one ``&num;''.
2458       </para>
2459       
2460       <para>
2461         
2462         <screen>
2463 # folder-hook . \
2464 set realname="Michael \"MuttDude\" Elkins"</screen>
2465         
2466       </para>
2467       
2468       <para>
2469         When testing your config files, beware the following caveat. The
2470         backslash
2471         at the end of the commented line extends the current line with the next
2472         line
2473         - then referred to as a ``continuation line''.  As the first line is
2474         commented with a hash (&num;) all following continuation lines are also
2475         part of a comment and therefore are ignored, too. So take care of
2476         comments
2477         when continuation lines are involved within your setup files!
2478       </para>
2479       
2480       <para>
2481         Abstract example:
2482       </para>
2483       
2484       <para>
2485         
2486         <screen>
2487 line1\
2488 line2a # line2b\
2489 line3\
2490 line4
2491 line5</screen>
2492         
2493       </para>
2494       
2495       <para>
2496         line1 ``continues'' until line4. however, the part after the &num; is a
2497         comment which includes line3 and line4. line5 is a new line of its own
2498         and
2499         thus is interpreted again.
2500       </para>
2501       
2502       <para>
2503         The commands understood by mutt are explained in the next paragraphs.
2504         For a complete list, see the <link linkend="commands">commands</link>.
2505       </para>
2506       
2507       <para>
2508         
2509       </para>
2510       
2511     </sect1>
2512     
2513     <sect1>
2514       <title>Expansion within variables    </title>
2515       
2516       <para>
2517         Besides just assign static content to variables, there's plenty of
2518         ways of adding external and more or less dynamic content.
2519       </para>
2520       
2521       <sect2>
2522         <title>Commands' Output     </title>
2523         
2524         <para>
2525           It is possible to substitute the output of a Unix command in an
2526           initialization file.  This is accomplished by enclosing the command
2527           in backquotes (``) as in, for example:
2528         </para>
2529         
2530         <para>
2531           
2532           <screen>
2533 my_hdr X-Operating-System: `uname -a`</screen>
2534           
2535         </para>
2536         
2537         <para>
2538           The output of the Unix command ``uname -a'' will be substituted
2539           before the line is parsed. Note that since initialization files are
2540           line oriented, only the first line of output from the Unix command
2541           will be substituted.
2542         </para>
2543         
2544       </sect2>
2545       
2546       <sect2>
2547         <title>Environment Variables     </title>
2548         
2549         <para>
2550           UNIX environments can be accessed like the way it is done in
2551           shells like sh and bash: Prepend the name of the environment by a
2552           ``&dollar;'' sign. For example,
2553         </para>
2554         
2555         <para>
2556           
2557           <screen>
2558 set record=+sent_on_$HOSTNAME</screen>
2559           
2560         </para>
2561         
2562         <para>
2563           sets the <link linkend="record">record</link> variable to the
2564           string <emphasis>+sent&lowbar;on&lowbar;</emphasis> and appends the
2565           value of the evironment
2566           variable <literal>&dollar;HOSTNAME</literal>.
2567         </para>
2568         
2569         <para>
2570           <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> There will be no warning if an
2571           environment variable
2572           is not defined. The result will of the expansion will then be empty.
2573         </para>
2574         
2575       </sect2>
2576       
2577       <sect2>
2578         <title>Configuration Variables     </title>
2579         
2580         <para>
2581           As for environment variables, the values of all configuration
2582           variables as string can be used in the same way, too. For example,
2583         </para>
2584         
2585         <para>
2586           
2587           <screen>
2588 set imap_home_namespace = $folder</screen>
2589           
2590         </para>
2591         
2592         <para>
2593           would set the value of <link linkend="imap-home-namespace">
2594             imap-home-namespace
2595           </link>
2596           to the value to
2597           which <link linkend="folder">folder</link> is <emphasis>currently</emphasis> set
2598           to.
2599         </para>
2600         
2601         <para>
2602           <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> There're no logical links
2603           established in such cases so
2604           that the the value for <link linkend="imap-home-namespace">
2605             imap-home-namespace
2606           </link>
2607           won't change even
2608           if <link linkend="folder">folder</link> gets changed.
2609         </para>
2610         
2611         <para>
2612           <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> There will be no warning if a
2613           configuration variable
2614           is not defined or is empty. The result will of the expansion will
2615           then be empty.
2616         </para>
2617         
2618       </sect2>
2619       
2620       <sect2>
2621         <title>Self-Defined Variables     </title>
2622         
2623         <para>
2624           Mutt-ng flexibly allows users to define their own variables. To
2625           avoid conflicts with the standard set and to prevent misleading
2626           error messages, there's a reserved namespace for them: all
2627           user-defined variables must be prefixed with <literal>user&lowbar;</literal> and can be
2628           used just like any ordinary configuration or environment
2629           variable.
2630         </para>
2631         
2632         <para>
2633           For example, to view the manual, users can either define two
2634           macros like the following
2635         </para>
2636         
2637         <para>
2638           
2639           <screen>
2640 macro generic &lt;F1&gt; "!less -r /path/to/manual" "Show manual"
2641 macro pager &lt;F1&gt; "!less -r /path/to/manual" "Show manual"</screen>
2642           
2643         </para>
2644         
2645         <para>
2646           for <literal>generic</literal>, <literal>pager</literal> and <literal>
2647             index
2648           </literal>
2649           .The alternative is to
2650           define a custom variable like so:
2651         </para>
2652         
2653         <para>
2654           
2655           <screen>
2656 set user_manualcmd = "!less -r /path/to_manual" 
2657 macro generic &lt;F1&gt; "$user_manualcmd&lt;enter&gt;" "Show manual"
2658 macro pager &lt;F1&gt; "$user_manualcmd&lt;enter&gt;" "Show manual"
2659 macro index &lt;F1&gt; "$user_manualcmd&lt;enter&gt;" "Show manual"</screen>
2660           
2661         </para>
2662         
2663         <para>
2664           to re-use the command sequence as in:
2665         </para>
2666         
2667         <para>
2668           
2669           <screen>
2670 macro index &lt;F2&gt; "$user_manualcmd | grep '\^[ ]\\+~. '" "Show Patterns"</screen>
2671           
2672         </para>
2673         
2674         <para>
2675           Using this feature, arbitrary sequences can be defined once and
2676           recalled and reused where necessary. More advanced scenarios could
2677           include to save a variable's value at the beginning of macro
2678           sequence and restore it at end.
2679         </para>
2680         
2681         <para>
2682           When the variable is first defined, the first value it gets
2683           assigned is also the initial value to which it can be reset using
2684           the <literal>reset</literal> command.
2685         </para>
2686         
2687         <para>
2688           The complete removal is done via the <literal>unset</literal>
2689           keyword.
2690         </para>
2691         
2692         <para>
2693           After the following sequence:
2694         </para>
2695         
2696         <para>
2697           
2698           <screen>
2699 set user_foo = 42
2700 set user_foo = 666</screen>
2701           
2702         </para>
2703         
2704         <para>
2705           the variable <literal>$user&lowbar;foo</literal> has a current value
2706           of 666 and an
2707           initial of 42. The query
2708         </para>
2709         
2710         <para>
2711           
2712           <screen>
2713 set ?user_foo</screen>
2714           
2715         </para>
2716         
2717         <para>
2718           will show 666. After doing the reset via
2719         </para>
2720         
2721         <para>
2722           
2723           <screen>
2724 reset user_foo</screen>
2725           
2726         </para>
2727         
2728         <para>
2729           a following query will give 42 as the result. After unsetting it
2730           via
2731         </para>
2732         
2733         <para>
2734           
2735           <screen>
2736 unset user_foo</screen>
2737           
2738         </para>
2739         
2740         <para>
2741           any query or operation (except the noted expansion within other
2742           statements) will lead to an error message.
2743         </para>
2744         
2745       </sect2>
2746       
2747       <sect2>
2748         <title>Pre-Defined Variables     </title>
2749         
2750         <para>
2751           In order to allow users to share one setup over a number of
2752           different machines without having to change its contents, there's a
2753           number of pre-defined variables. These are prefixed with
2754           <literal>muttng&lowbar;</literal> and are read-only, i.e. they cannot
2755           be set, unset or
2756           reset. The reference chapter lists all available variables.
2757         </para>
2758         
2759         <para>
2760           <emphasis> Please consult the local copy of your manual for their
2761             values as they may differ from different manual sources.
2762           </emphasis>
2763           Where
2764           the manual is installed in can be queried (already using such a
2765           variable) by running:
2766         </para>
2767         
2768         <para>
2769           
2770           <screen>
2771 muttng -Q muttng_docdir</screen>
2772           
2773         </para>
2774         
2775         <para>
2776           To extend the example for viewing the manual via self-defined
2777           variables, it can be made more readable and more portable by
2778           changing the real path in:
2779         </para>
2780         
2781         <para>
2782           
2783           <screen>
2784 set user_manualcmd = '!less -r /path/to_manual'</screen>
2785           
2786         </para>
2787         
2788         <para>
2789           to:
2790         </para>
2791         
2792         <para>
2793           
2794           <screen>
2795 set user_manualcmd = "!less -r $muttng_docdir/manual.txt"</screen>
2796           
2797         </para>
2798         
2799         <para>
2800           which works everywhere if a manual is installed.
2801         </para>
2802         
2803         <para>
2804           Please note that by the type of quoting, muttng determines when
2805           to expand these values: when it finds double quotes, the value will
2806           be expanded during reading the setup files but when it finds single
2807           quotes, it'll expand it at runtime as needed.
2808         </para>
2809         
2810         <para>
2811           For example, the statement
2812         </para>
2813         
2814         <para>
2815           
2816           <screen>
2817 folder-hook . "set user_current_folder = $muttng_folder_name"</screen>
2818           
2819         </para>
2820         
2821         <para>
2822           will be already be translated to the following when reading the
2823           startup files:
2824         </para>
2825         
2826         <para>
2827           
2828           <screen>
2829 folder-hook . "set user_current_folder = some_folder"</screen>
2830           
2831         </para>
2832         
2833         <para>
2834           with <literal>some&lowbar;folder</literal> being the name of the
2835           first folder muttng
2836           opens. On the contrary,
2837         </para>
2838         
2839         <para>
2840           
2841           <screen>
2842 folder-hook . 'set user_current_folder = $muttng_folder_name'</screen>
2843           
2844         </para>
2845         
2846         <para>
2847           will be executed at runtime because of the single quotes so that
2848           <literal>user&lowbar;current&lowbar;folder</literal> will always have
2849           the value of the currently
2850           opened folder.
2851         </para>
2852         
2853         <para>
2854           A more practical example is:
2855         </para>
2856         
2857         <para>
2858           
2859           <screen>
2860 folder-hook . 'source ~/.mutt/score-$muttng_folder_name'</screen>
2861           
2862         </para>
2863         
2864         <para>
2865           which can be used to source files containing score commands
2866           depending on the folder the user enters.
2867         </para>
2868         
2869       </sect2>
2870       
2871       <sect2>
2872         <title>Type Conversions     </title>
2873         
2874         <para>
2875           A note about variable's types during conversion: internally
2876           values are stored in internal types but for any dump/query or set
2877           operation they're converted to and from string. That means that
2878           there's no need to worry about types when referencing any variable.
2879           As an example, the following can be used without harm (besides
2880           makeing muttng very likely behave strange):
2881         </para>
2882         
2883         <para>
2884           
2885           <screen>
2886 set read_inc = 100
2887 set folder = $read_inc
2888 set read_inc = $folder
2889 set user_magic_number = 42
2890 set folder = $user_magic_number</screen>
2891           
2892         </para>
2893         
2894       </sect2>
2895       
2896     </sect1>
2897     
2898     <sect1 id="alias">
2899       <title>Defining/Using aliases  </title>
2900       
2901       <para>
2902         Usage: <literal>alias</literal> <emphasis>key</emphasis> <emphasis>
2903           address
2904         </emphasis>
2905         &lsqb; , <emphasis>address</emphasis>, ... &rsqb;
2906       </para>
2907       
2908       <para>
2909         It's usually very cumbersome to remember or type out the address of
2910         someone
2911         you are communicating with.  Mutt-ng allows you to create ``aliases''
2912         which map
2913         a short string to a full address.
2914       </para>
2915       
2916       <para>
2917         <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> if you want to create an alias
2918         for a group (by specifying more than
2919         one address), you <emphasis role="bold">must</emphasis> separate the
2920         addresses with a comma (``,'').
2921       </para>
2922       
2923       <para>
2924         To remove an alias or aliases (``*'' means all aliases):
2925       </para>
2926       
2927       <para>
2928         <literal>unalias</literal> &lsqb; * &verbar; <emphasis>key</emphasis> <emphasis>
2929           ...
2930         </emphasis>
2931         &rsqb;
2932       </para>
2933       
2934       <para>
2935         
2936         <screen>
2937 alias muttdude me@cs.hmc.edu (Michael Elkins)
2938 alias theguys manny, moe, jack</screen>
2939         
2940       </para>
2941       
2942       <para>
2943         Unlike other mailers, Mutt-ng doesn't require aliases to be defined
2944         in a special file.  The <literal>alias</literal> command can appear
2945         anywhere in
2946         a configuration file, as long as this file is <link linkend="source">
2947           source
2948         </link>
2949         .Consequently, you can have multiple alias files, or
2950         you can have all aliases defined in your muttrc.
2951       </para>
2952       
2953       <para>
2954         On the other hand, the <link linkend="create-alias">create-alias</link>
2955         function can use only one file, the one pointed to by the <link linkend="alias-file">
2956           alias-file
2957         </link>
2958         variable (which is
2959         <literal>&tilde;/.muttrc</literal> by default). This file is not
2960         special either,
2961         in the sense that Mutt-ng will happily append aliases to any file, but
2962         in
2963         order for the new aliases to take effect you need to explicitly <link linkend="source">
2964           source
2965         </link>
2966         this file too.
2967       </para>
2968       
2969       <para>
2970         For example:
2971       </para>
2972       
2973       <para>
2974         
2975         <screen>
2976 source /usr/local/share/Mutt-ng.aliases
2977 source ~/.mail_aliases
2978 set alias_file=~/.mail_aliases</screen>
2979         
2980       </para>
2981       
2982       <para>
2983         To use aliases, you merely use the alias at any place in mutt where
2984         muttprompts for addresses, such as the <emphasis>To:</emphasis> or <emphasis>
2985           Cc:
2986         </emphasis>
2987         prompt.  You can
2988         also enter aliases in your editor at the appropriate headers if you
2989         have the
2990         <link linkend="edit-headers">edit-headers</link> variable set.
2991       </para>
2992       
2993       <para>
2994         In addition, at the various address prompts, you can use the tab
2995         character
2996         to expand a partial alias to the full alias.  If there are multiple
2997         matches,
2998         mutt will bring up a menu with the matching aliases.  In order to be
2999         presented with the full list of aliases, you must hit tab with out a
3000         partial
3001         alias, such as at the beginning of the prompt or after a comma denoting
3002         multiple addresses.
3003       </para>
3004       
3005       <para>
3006         In the alias menu, you can select as many aliases as you want with the
3007         <emphasis>select-entry</emphasis> key (default: RET), and use the <emphasis>
3008           exit
3009         </emphasis>
3010         key
3011         (default: q) to return to the address prompt.
3012       </para>
3013       
3014       <para>
3015         
3016       </para>
3017       
3018     </sect1>
3019     
3020     <sect1 id="bind">
3021       <title>Changing the default key bindings  </title>
3022       
3023       <para>
3024         Usage: <literal>bind</literal> <emphasis>map</emphasis> <emphasis>key</emphasis> <emphasis>
3025           function
3026         </emphasis>
3027       </para>
3028       
3029       <para>
3030         This command allows you to change the default key bindings (operation
3031         invoked when pressing a key).
3032       </para>
3033       
3034       <para>
3035         <emphasis>map</emphasis> specifies in which menu the binding belongs. 
3036         Multiple maps may
3037         be specified by separating them with commas (no additional whitespace
3038         isallowed). The currently defined maps are:
3039       </para>
3040       
3041       <para>
3042         <anchor id="maps"/>
3043         <variablelist>
3044           
3045           <varlistentry>
3046             <term>generic</term>
3047             <listitem>
3048               <para>
3049                 This is not a real menu, but is used as a fallback for all of
3050                 the other
3051                 menus except for the pager and editor modes.  If a key is not
3052                 defined in
3053                 another menu, Mutt-ng will look for a binding to use in this
3054                 menu.  This allows
3055                 you to bind a key to a certain function in multiple menus
3056                 instead of having
3057                 multiple bind statements to accomplish the same task.
3058               </para>
3059             </listitem>
3060           </varlistentry>
3061           <varlistentry>
3062             <term>alias</term>
3063             <listitem>
3064               <para>
3065                 The alias menu is the list of your personal aliases as defined
3066                 in your
3067                 muttrc.  It is the mapping from a short alias name to the full
3068                 email
3069                 address(es) of the recipient(s).
3070               </para>
3071             </listitem>
3072           </varlistentry>
3073           <varlistentry>
3074             <term>attach</term>
3075             <listitem>
3076               <para>
3077                 The attachment menu is used to access the attachments on
3078                 received messages.
3079               </para>
3080             </listitem>
3081           </varlistentry>
3082           <varlistentry>
3083             <term>browser</term>
3084             <listitem>
3085               <para>
3086                 The browser is used for both browsing the local directory
3087                 structure, and for
3088                 listing all of your incoming mailboxes.
3089               </para>
3090             </listitem>
3091           </varlistentry>
3092           <varlistentry>
3093             <term>editor</term>
3094             <listitem>
3095               <para>
3096                 The editor is the line-based editor the user enters text data.
3097               </para>
3098             </listitem>
3099           </varlistentry>
3100           <varlistentry>
3101             <term>index</term>
3102             <listitem>
3103               <para>
3104                 The index is the list of messages contained in a mailbox.
3105               </para>
3106             </listitem>
3107           </varlistentry>
3108           <varlistentry>
3109             <term>compose</term>
3110             <listitem>
3111               <para>
3112                 The compose menu is the screen used when sending a new message.
3113               </para>
3114             </listitem>
3115           </varlistentry>
3116           <varlistentry>
3117             <term>pager</term>
3118             <listitem>
3119               <para>
3120                 The pager is the mode used to display message/attachment data,
3121                 and help
3122                 listings.
3123               </para>
3124             </listitem>
3125           </varlistentry>
3126           <varlistentry>
3127             <term>pgp</term>
3128             <listitem>
3129               <para>
3130                 The pgp menu is used to select the OpenPGP keys used for
3131                 encrypting outgoing
3132                 messages.
3133               </para>
3134             </listitem>
3135           </varlistentry>
3136           <varlistentry>
3137             <term>postpone</term>
3138             <listitem>
3139               <para>
3140                 The postpone menu is similar to the index menu, except is used
3141                 when
3142                 recalling a message the user was composing, but saved until
3143                 later.
3144               </para>
3145             </listitem>
3146           </varlistentry>
3147         </variablelist>
3148       </para>
3149       
3150       <para>
3151         <emphasis>key</emphasis> is the key (or key sequence) you wish to bind.
3152          To specify a
3153         control character, use the sequence <emphasis>&bsol;Cx</emphasis>,
3154         where <emphasis>x</emphasis> is the
3155         letter of the control character (for example, to specify control-A use
3156         ``&bsol;Ca'').  Note that the case of <emphasis>x</emphasis> as well as
3157         <emphasis>&bsol;C</emphasis> is
3158         ignored, so that <emphasis>&bsol;CA</emphasis>, <emphasis>&bsol;Ca</emphasis>, <emphasis>
3159           &bsol;cA
3160         </emphasis>
3161         and <emphasis>&bsol;ca</emphasis> are all
3162         equivalent.  An alternative form is to specify the key as a three digit
3163         octal number prefixed with a ``&bsol;'' (for example <emphasis>
3164           &bsol;177
3165         </emphasis>
3166         is
3167         equivalent to <emphasis>&bsol;c?</emphasis>).
3168       </para>
3169       
3170       <para>
3171         In addition, <emphasis>key</emphasis> may consist of:
3172       </para>
3173       
3174       <para>
3175         
3176         <table>
3177           <title>Alternative Key Names</title>
3178           <tgroup cols="2" align="left" colsep="1" rowsep="1">
3179           <thead>
3180             <row>
3181               <entry>Sequence</entry>
3182               <entry>Description</entry>
3183             </row>
3184           </thead>
3185           <tbody>
3186             <row><entry><code>\t     </code></entry><entry>tab</entry></row>
3187             <row><entry><code>&#60;tab&#62;      </code></entry><entry>tab</entry></row>
3188             <row><entry><code>&#60;backtab&#62;   </code></entry><entry>backtab / shift-tab</entry></row>
3189             <row><entry><code>\r    </code></entry><entry>carriage return</entry></row>
3190             <row><entry><code>\n     </code></entry><entry>newline</entry></row>
3191             <row><entry><code>\e      </code></entry><entry>escape</entry></row>
3192             <row><entry><code>&#60;esc&#62;   </code></entry><entry>escape</entry></row>
3193             <row><entry><code>&#60;up&#62;     </code></entry><entry>up arrow</entry></row>
3194             <row><entry><code>&#60;down&#62;     </code></entry><entry>down arrow</entry></row>
3195             <row><entry><code>&#60;left&#62;     </code></entry><entry>left arrow</entry></row>
3196             <row><entry><code>&#60;right&#62;    </code></entry><entry>right arrow</entry></row>
3197             <row><entry><code>&#60;pageup&#62;   </code></entry><entry>Page Up</entry></row>
3198             <row><entry><code>&#60;pagedown&#62;  </code></entry><entry>Page Down</entry></row>
3199             <row><entry><code>&#60;backspace&#62;  </code></entry><entry>Backspace</entry></row>
3200             <row><entry><code>&#60;delete&#62;    </code></entry><entry>Delete</entry></row>
3201             <row><entry><code>&#60;insert&#62;     </code></entry><entry>Insert</entry></row>
3202             <row><entry><code>&#60;enter&#62;    </code></entry><entry>Enter</entry></row>
3203             <row><entry><code>&#60;return&#62;   </code></entry><entry>Return</entry></row>
3204             <row><entry><code>&#60;home&#62;     </code></entry><entry>Home</entry></row>
3205             <row><entry><code>&#60;end&#62;      </code></entry><entry>End</entry></row>
3206             <row><entry><code>&#60;space&#62;    </code></entry><entry>Space bar</entry></row>
3207             <row><entry><code>&#60;f1&#62;       </code></entry><entry>function key 1</entry></row>
3208             <row><entry><code>&#60;f10&#62;       </code></entry><entry>function key 10</entry></row>
3209           </tbody>
3210         </tgroup>
3211       </table>
3212         
3213       </para>
3214       
3215       <para>
3216         <emphasis>key</emphasis> does not need to be enclosed in quotes unless
3217         it contains a
3218         space (`` '').
3219       </para>
3220       
3221       <para>
3222         <emphasis>function</emphasis> specifies which action to take when <emphasis>
3223           key
3224         </emphasis>
3225         is pressed.
3226         For a complete list of functions, see the <link linkend="functions">
3227           functions
3228         </link>
3229         .The special function <literal>noop</literal> unbinds the specified key
3230         sequence.
3231       </para>
3232       
3233       <para>
3234         
3235       </para>
3236       
3237     </sect1>
3238     
3239     <sect1 id="charset-hook">
3240       <title>Defining aliases for character sets   </title>
3241       
3242       <para>
3243         Usage: <literal>charset-hook</literal> <emphasis>alias</emphasis> <emphasis>
3244           charset
3245         </emphasis>
3246         
3247         Usage: <literal>iconv-hook</literal> <emphasis>charset</emphasis> <emphasis>
3248           local-charset
3249         </emphasis>
3250       </para>
3251       
3252       <para>
3253         The <literal>charset-hook</literal> command defines an alias for a
3254         character set.
3255         This is useful to properly display messages which are tagged with a
3256         character set name not known to mutt.
3257       </para>
3258       
3259       <para>
3260         The <literal>iconv-hook</literal> command defines a system-specific
3261         name for a
3262         character set.  This is helpful when your systems character
3263         conversion library insists on using strange, system-specific names
3264         for character sets.
3265       </para>
3266       
3267       <para>
3268         
3269       </para>
3270       
3271     </sect1>
3272     
3273     <sect1 id="folder-hook">
3274       <title>Setting variables based upon mailbox  </title>
3275       
3276       <para>
3277         Usage: <literal>folder-hook</literal> &lsqb;!&rsqb;<emphasis>regexp</emphasis> <emphasis>
3278           command
3279         </emphasis>
3280       </para>
3281       
3282       <para>
3283         It is often desirable to change settings based on which mailbox you are
3284         reading.  The folder-hook command provides a method by which you can
3285         execute
3286         any configuration command.  <emphasis>regexp</emphasis> is a regular
3287         expression specifying
3288         in which mailboxes to execute <emphasis>command</emphasis> before
3289         loading.  If a mailbox
3290         matches multiple folder-hook's, they are executed in the order given in
3291         the
3292         muttrc.
3293       </para>
3294       
3295       <para>
3296         <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> if you use the ``!'' shortcut
3297         for <link linkend="spoolfile">spoolfile</link> at the beginning of the
3298         pattern, you must place it
3299         inside of double or single quotes in order to distinguish it from the
3300         logical <emphasis>not</emphasis> operator for the expression.
3301       </para>
3302       
3303       <para>
3304         Note that the settings are <emphasis>not</emphasis> restored when you
3305         leave the mailbox.
3306         For example, a command action to perform is to change the sorting
3307         methodbased upon the mailbox being read:
3308       </para>
3309       
3310       <para>
3311         
3312         <screen>
3313 folder-hook mutt set sort=threads</screen>
3314         
3315       </para>
3316       
3317       <para>
3318         However, the sorting method is not restored to its previous value when
3319         reading a different mailbox.  To specify a <emphasis>default</emphasis>
3320         command, use the
3321         pattern ``.'':
3322       </para>
3323       
3324       <para>
3325         
3326         <screen>
3327 folder-hook . set sort=date-sent</screen>
3328         
3329       </para>
3330       
3331       <para>
3332         
3333       </para>
3334       
3335     </sect1>
3336     
3337     <sect1 id="macro">
3338       <title>Keyboard macros  </title>
3339       
3340       <para>
3341         Usage: <literal>macro</literal> <emphasis>menu</emphasis> <emphasis>key</emphasis> <emphasis>
3342           sequence
3343         </emphasis>
3344         &lsqb; <emphasis>description</emphasis> &rsqb;
3345       </para>
3346       
3347       <para>
3348         Macros are useful when you would like a single key to perform a series
3349         of
3350         actions.  When you press <emphasis>key</emphasis> in menu <emphasis>
3351           menu
3352         </emphasis>
3353         ,Mutt-ng will behave as if
3354         you had typed <emphasis>sequence</emphasis>.  So if you have a common
3355         sequence of commands
3356         you type, you can create a macro to execute those commands with a
3357         singlekey.
3358       </para>
3359       
3360       <para>
3361         <emphasis>menu</emphasis> is the <link linkend="maps">maps</link> which
3362         the macro will be bound.
3363         Multiple maps may be specified by separating multiple menu arguments by
3364         commas. Whitespace may not be used in between the menu arguments and
3365         thecommas separating them.
3366       </para>
3367       
3368       <para>
3369         <emphasis>key</emphasis> and <emphasis>sequence</emphasis> are expanded
3370         by the same rules as the <link linkend="bind">bind</link>.  There are
3371         some additions however.  The
3372         first is that control characters in <emphasis>sequence</emphasis> can
3373         also be specified
3374         as <emphasis>&circ;x</emphasis>.  In order to get a caret (`&circ;'')
3375         you need to use
3376         <emphasis>&circ;&circ;</emphasis>.  Secondly, to specify a certain key
3377         such as <emphasis>up</emphasis>
3378         or to invoke a function directly, you can use the format
3379         <emphasis>&lt;key name&gt;</emphasis> and <emphasis>&lt;function
3380           name&gt;
3381         </emphasis>
3382         .For a listing of key
3383         names see the section on <link linkend="bind">bind</link>.  Functions
3384         are listed in the <link linkend="functions">functions</link>.
3385       </para>
3386       
3387       <para>
3388         The advantage with using function names directly is that the macros
3389         willwork regardless of the current key bindings, so they are not
3390         dependent on
3391         the user having particular key definitions.  This makes them more
3392         robustand portable, and also facilitates defining of macros in files
3393         used by more
3394         than one user (eg. the system Muttngrc).
3395       </para>
3396       
3397       <para>
3398         Optionally you can specify a descriptive text after <emphasis>sequence</emphasis>,
3399         which is shown in the help screens.
3400       </para>
3401       
3402       <para>
3403         <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> Macro definitions (if any)
3404         listed in the help screen(s), are
3405         silently truncated at the screen width, and are not wrapped.   
3406       </para>
3407       
3408       <para>
3409         
3410       </para>
3411       
3412     </sect1>
3413     
3414     <sect1 id="color">
3415       <title>Using color and mono video attributes  </title>
3416       
3417       <para>
3418         Usage: <literal>color</literal> <emphasis>object</emphasis> <emphasis>
3419           foreground
3420         </emphasis>
3421         <emphasis>background</emphasis> &lsqb; <emphasis>regexp</emphasis>
3422         &rsqb;
3423         
3424         Usage: <literal>color</literal> index <emphasis>foreground</emphasis> <emphasis>
3425           background
3426         </emphasis>
3427         <emphasis>pattern</emphasis>
3428         
3429         Usage: <literal>uncolor</literal> index <emphasis>pattern</emphasis>
3430         &lsqb; <emphasis>pattern</emphasis> ...  &rsqb;
3431         
3432       </para>
3433       
3434       <para>
3435         If your terminal supports color, you can spice up Mutt-ng by creating
3436         your own
3437         color scheme.  To define the color of an object (type of information),
3438         you
3439         must specify both a foreground color <emphasis role="bold">and</emphasis> a background color (it is not
3440         possible to only specify one or the other).
3441       </para>
3442       
3443       <para>
3444         <emphasis>object</emphasis> can be one of:
3445       </para>
3446       
3447       <para>
3448         
3449         <itemizedlist>
3450           <listitem>
3451             
3452             <para>
3453               attachment
3454             </para>
3455           </listitem>
3456           <listitem>
3457             
3458             <para>
3459               body (match <emphasis>regexp</emphasis> in the body of messages)
3460             </para>
3461           </listitem>
3462           <listitem>
3463             
3464             <para>
3465               bold (highlighting bold patterns in the body of messages)
3466             </para>
3467           </listitem>
3468           <listitem>
3469             
3470             <para>
3471               error (error messages printed by Mutt-ng)
3472             </para>
3473           </listitem>
3474           <listitem>
3475             
3476             <para>
3477               header (match <emphasis>regexp</emphasis> in the message header)
3478             </para>
3479           </listitem>
3480           <listitem>
3481             
3482             <para>
3483               hdrdefault (default color of the message header in the pager)
3484             </para>
3485           </listitem>
3486           <listitem>
3487             
3488             <para>
3489               index (match <emphasis>pattern</emphasis> in the message index)
3490             </para>
3491           </listitem>
3492           <listitem>
3493             
3494             <para>
3495               indicator (arrow or bar used to indicate the current item in a
3496               menu)
3497             </para>
3498           </listitem>
3499           <listitem>
3500             
3501             <para>
3502               markers (the ``+'' markers at the beginning of wrapped lines in
3503               the pager)
3504             </para>
3505           </listitem>
3506           <listitem>
3507             
3508             <para>
3509               message (informational messages)
3510             </para>
3511           </listitem>
3512           <listitem>
3513             
3514             <para>
3515               normal
3516             </para>
3517           </listitem>
3518           <listitem>
3519             
3520             <para>
3521               quoted (text matching <link linkend="quote-regexp">quote-regexp</link> in the body of a message)
3522             </para>
3523           </listitem>
3524           <listitem>
3525             
3526             <para>
3527               quoted1, quoted2, ..., quoted<emphasis role="bold">N</emphasis>
3528               (higher levels of quoting)
3529             </para>
3530           </listitem>
3531           <listitem>
3532             
3533             <para>
3534               search (highlighting of words in the pager)
3535             </para>
3536           </listitem>
3537           <listitem>
3538             
3539             <para>
3540               signature
3541             </para>
3542           </listitem>
3543           <listitem>
3544             
3545             <para>
3546               status (mode lines used to display info about the mailbox or
3547               message)
3548             </para>
3549           </listitem>
3550           <listitem>
3551             
3552             <para>
3553               tilde (the ``&tilde;'' used to pad blank lines in the pager)
3554             </para>
3555           </listitem>
3556           <listitem>
3557             
3558             <para>
3559               tree (thread tree drawn in the message index and attachment menu)
3560             </para>
3561           </listitem>
3562           <listitem>
3563             
3564             <para>
3565               underline (highlighting underlined patterns in the body of
3566               messages)
3567             </para>
3568           </listitem>
3569           
3570         </itemizedlist>
3571         
3572       </para>
3573       
3574       <para>
3575         <emphasis>foreground</emphasis> and <emphasis>background</emphasis> can
3576         be one of the following:
3577       </para>
3578       
3579       <para>
3580         
3581         <itemizedlist>
3582           <listitem>
3583             
3584             <para>
3585               white
3586             </para>
3587           </listitem>
3588           <listitem>
3589             
3590             <para>
3591               black
3592             </para>
3593           </listitem>
3594           <listitem>
3595             
3596             <para>
3597               green
3598             </para>
3599           </listitem>
3600           <listitem>
3601             
3602             <para>
3603               magenta
3604             </para>
3605           </listitem>
3606           <listitem>
3607             
3608             <para>
3609               blue
3610             </para>
3611           </listitem>
3612           <listitem>
3613             
3614             <para>
3615               cyan
3616             </para>
3617           </listitem>
3618           <listitem>
3619             
3620             <para>
3621               yellow
3622             </para>
3623           </listitem>
3624           <listitem>
3625             
3626             <para>
3627               red
3628             </para>
3629           </listitem>
3630           <listitem>
3631             
3632             <para>
3633               default
3634             </para>
3635           </listitem>
3636           <listitem>
3637             
3638             <para>
3639               color<emphasis>x</emphasis>
3640             </para>
3641           </listitem>
3642           
3643         </itemizedlist>
3644         
3645       </para>
3646       
3647       <para>
3648         <emphasis>foreground</emphasis> can optionally be prefixed with the
3649         keyword <literal>bright</literal> to make
3650         the foreground color boldfaced (e.g., <literal>brightred</literal>).
3651       </para>
3652       
3653       <para>
3654         If your terminal supports it, the special keyword <emphasis>default</emphasis> can be
3655         used as a transparent color.  The value <emphasis>brightdefault</emphasis> is also valid.
3656         If Mutt-ng is linked against the <emphasis>S-Lang</emphasis> library,
3657         you also need to set
3658         the <emphasis>COLORFGBG</emphasis> environment variable to the default
3659         colors of your
3660         terminal for this to work; for example (for Bourne-like shells):
3661       </para>
3662       
3663       <para>
3664         
3665         <screen>
3666 set COLORFGBG="green;black"
3667 export COLORFGBG</screen>
3668         
3669       </para>
3670       
3671       <para>
3672         <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> The <emphasis>S-Lang</emphasis>
3673         library requires you to use the <emphasis>lightgray</emphasis>
3674         and <emphasis>brown</emphasis> keywords instead of <emphasis>white</emphasis> and <emphasis>
3675           yellow
3676         </emphasis>
3677         when
3678         setting this variable.
3679       </para>
3680       
3681       <para>
3682         <emphasis role="bold">Note:</emphasis> The uncolor command can be
3683         applied to the index object only.  It
3684         removes entries from the list. You <emphasis role="bold">must</emphasis> specify the same pattern
3685         specified in the color command for it to be removed.  The pattern ``*''
3686         is
3687         a special token which means to clear the color index list of all
3688         entries.
3689       </para>
3690       
3691       <para>
3692         Mutt-ng also recognizes the keywords <emphasis>color0</emphasis>, <emphasis>
3693           color1
3694         </emphasis>
3695         ,&hellip;,
3696         <emphasis>color</emphasis><emphasis role="bold">N-1</emphasis> (<emphasis role="bold">
3697           N
3698         </emphasis>
3699         being the number of colors supported
3700         by your terminal).  This is useful when you remap the colors for your
3701         display (for example by changing the color associated with <emphasis>
3702           color2
3703         </emphasis>
3704         for your xterm), since color names may then lose their normal meaning.
3705       </para>
3706       
3707       <para>
3708         If your terminal does not support color, it is still possible change
3709         the video
3710         attributes through the use of the ``mono'' command:
3711       </para>
3712       
3713       <para>
3714         Usage: <literal>mono</literal> <emphasis>&lt;object&gt;
3715           &lt;attribute&gt;
3716         </emphasis>
3717         &lsqb; <emphasis>regexp</emphasis> &rsqb;
3718         
3719         Usage: <literal>mono</literal> index <emphasis>attribute</emphasis> <emphasis>
3720           pattern
3721         </emphasis>
3722         
3723         Usage: <literal>unmono</literal> index <emphasis>pattern</emphasis>
3724         &lsqb; <emphasis>pattern</emphasis> ...  &rsqb;
3725         
3726       </para>
3727       
3728       <para>
3729         where <emphasis>attribute</emphasis> is one of the following:
3730       </para>
3731       
3732       <para>
3733         
3734         <itemizedlist>
3735           <listitem>
3736             
3737             <para>
3738               none
3739             </para>
3740           </listitem>
3741           <listitem>
3742             
3743             <para>
3744               bold
3745             </para>
3746           </listitem>
3747           <listitem>
3748             
3749             <para>
3750               underline
3751             </para>
3752           </listitem>
3753           <listitem>
3754             
3755             <para>
3756               reverse
3757             </para>
3758           </listitem>
3759           <listitem>
3760             
3761             <para>
3762               standout
3763             </para>
3764           </listitem>
3765           
3766         </itemizedlist>
3767         
3768       </para>
3769       
3770       <para>
3771         
3772       </para>
3773       
3774     </sect1>
3775     
3776     <sect1 id="ignore">
3777       <title>Ignoring (weeding) unwanted message headers  </title>
3778       
3779       <para>
3780         Usage: <literal>&lsqb;un&rsqb;ignore</literal> <emphasis>pattern</emphasis> &lsqb; <emphasis>
3781           pattern
3782         </emphasis>
3783         ... &rsqb;
3784       </para>
3785       
3786       <para>
3787         Messages often have many header fields added by automatic processing
3788         systems,
3789         or which may not seem useful to display on the screen.  This command
3790         allows
3791         you to specify header fields which you don't normally want to see.
3792       </para>
3793       
3794       <para>
3795         You do not need to specify the full header field name.  For example,
3796         ``ignore content-'' will ignore all header fields that begin with the
3797         pattern
3798         ``content-''. ``ignore *'' will ignore all headers.
3799       </para>
3800       
3801       <para>
3802         To remove a previously added token from the list, use the ``unignore''
3803         command.
3804         The ``unignore'' command will make Mutt-ng display headers with the
3805         given pattern.
3806         For example, if you do ``ignore x-'' it is possible to ``unignore
3807         x-mailer''.
3808       </para>
3809       
3810       <para>
3811         ``unignore *'' will remove all tokens from the ignore list.
3812       </para>
3813       
3814       <para>
3815         For example:
3816         
3817         <screen>
3818 # Sven's draconian header weeding
3819 ignore *
3820 unignore from date subject to cc
3821 unignore organization organisation x-mailer: x-newsreader: x-mailing-list:
3822 unignore posted-to:</screen>
3823         
3824       </para>
3825       
3826       <para>
3827         
3828       </para>
3829       
3830     </sect1>
3831     
3832     <sect1 id="alternates">
3833       <title>Alternative addresses  </title>
3834       
3835       <para>
3836         Usage: <literal>&lsqb;un&rsqb;alternates</literal> <emphasis>regexp</emphasis> &lsqb; <emphasis>
3837           regexp
3838         </emphasis>
3839         ... &rsqb;
3840         
3841       </para>
3842       
3843       <para>
3844         With various functions, mutt will treat messages differently,
3845         depending on whether you sent them or whether you received them from
3846         someone else.  For instance, when replying to a message that you
3847         sent to a different party, mutt will automatically suggest to send
3848         the response to the original message's recipients -- responding to
3849         yourself won't make much sense in many cases.  (See <link linkend="reply-to">
3850           reply-to
3851         </link>
3852         .)
3853       </para>
3854       
3855       <para>
3856         Many users receive e-mail under a number of different addresses. To
3857         fully use mutt's features here, the program must be able to
3858         recognize what e-mail addresses you receive mail under. That's the
3859         purpose of the <literal>alternates</literal> command: It takes a list
3860         of regular
3861         expressions, each of which can identify an address under which you
3862         receive e-mail.
3863       </para>
3864       
3865       <para>
3866         The <literal>unalternates</literal> command can be used to write
3867         exceptions to
3868         <literal>alternates</literal> patterns. If an address matches something
3869         in an
3870         <literal>alternates</literal> command, but you nonetheless do not think
3871         it is
3872         from you, you can list a more precise pattern under an <literal>
3873           unalternates
3874         </literal>
3875         command.
3876       </para>
3877       
3878       <para>
3879         To remove a regular expression from the <literal>alternates</literal>
3880         list, use the
3881         <literal>unalternates</literal> command with exactly the same <emphasis>
3882           regexp
3883         </emphasis>
3884         .
3885         Likewise, if the <emphasis>regexp</emphasis> for a <literal>alternates</literal> command matches
3886         an entry on the <literal>unalternates</literal> list, that <literal>
3887           unalternates
3888         </literal>
3889         entry will be removed. If the <emphasis>regexp</emphasis> for <literal>
3890           unalternates
3891         </literal>
3892         is ``*'', <emphasis>all entries</emphasis> on <literal>alternates</literal> will be removed.
3893       </para>
3894       
3895       <para>
3896         
3897       </para>
3898       
3899     </sect1>
3900     
3901     <sect1>
3902       <title>Format = Flowed    </title>
3903       
3904       <sect2>
3905         <title>Introduction      </title>
3906         
3907         <para>
3908           Mutt-ng contains support for so-called <literal>format=flowed</literal> messages.
3909           In the beginning of email, each message had a fixed line width, and
3910           it was enough for displaying them on fixed-size terminals. But times
3911           changed, and nowadays hardly anybody still uses fixed-size terminals:
3912           more people nowaydays use graphical user interfaces, with dynamically
3913           resizable windows. This led to the demand of a new email format that
3914           makes it possible for the email client to make the email look nice
3915           in a resizable window without breaking quoting levels and creating
3916           an incompatible email format that can also be displayed nicely on
3917           old fixed-size terminals.
3918         </para>
3919         
3920         <para>
3921           For introductory information on <literal>format=flowed</literal>
3922           messages, see
3923           <ulink URL="http://www.joeclark.org/ffaq.html">&#60;http://www.joeclark.org/ffaq.html&#62;</ulink>.
3924         </para>
3925         
3926       </sect2>
3927       
3928       <sect2>
3929         <title>Receiving: Display Setup      </title>
3930         
3931         <para>
3932           When you receive emails that are marked as <literal>format=flowed</literal>
3933           messages, and is formatted correctly, mutt-ng will try to reformat
3934           the message to optimally fit on your terminal. If you want a fixed
3935           margin on the right side of your terminal, you can set the
3936           following:
3937         </para>
3938         
3939         <para>
3940           
3941           <screen>
3942 set wrapmargin = 10</screen>
3943           
3944         </para>
3945         
3946         <para>
3947           The code above makes the line break 10 columns before the right
3948           side of the terminal.
3949         </para>
3950         
3951         <para>
3952           If your terminal is so wide that the lines are embarrassingly long,
3953           you can also set a maximum line length:
3954         </para>
3955         
3956         <para>
3957           
3958           <screen>
3959 set max_line_length = 120</screen>
3960           
3961         </para>
3962         
3963         <para>
3964           The example above will give you lines not longer than 120
3965           characters.
3966         </para>
3967         
3968         <para>
3969           When you view at <literal>format=flowed</literal> messages, you will
3970           often see
3971           the quoting hierarchy like in the&nbs