Andreas Krennmair:
[apps/madmutt.git] / doc / muttrc.man
1 '\" t
2 .\" -*-nroff-*-
3 .\"
4 .\"     Copyright (C) 1996-2000 Michael R. Elkins <me@cs.hmc.edu>
5 .\"     Copyright (C) 1999-2000 Thomas Roessler <roessler@guug.de>
6 .\" 
7 .\"     This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
8 .\"     it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
9 .\"     the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
10 .\"     (at your option) any later version.
11 .\" 
12 .\"     This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
13 .\"     but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
14 .\"     MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
15 .\"     GNU General Public License for more details.
16 .\" 
17 .\"     You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
18 .\"     along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
19 .\"     Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111, USA.
20 .\"
21 .TH muttrc 5 "September 2002" Unix "User Manuals"
22 .SH NAME
23 muttrc \- Configuration file for the Mutt Mail User Agent
24 .SH DESCRIPTION
25 .PP
26 A mutt configuration file consists of a series of \(lqcommands\(rq.
27 Each line of the file may contain one or more commands.  When
28 multiple commands are used, they must be separated by a semicolon
29 (\(lq\fB;\fP\(rq).
30 .PP
31 The hash mark, or pound sign (\(lq\fB#\fP\(rq), is used as a
32 \(lqcomment\(rq character. You can use it to annotate your
33 initialization file. All text after the comment character to the end
34 of the line is ignored.
35 .PP
36 Single quotes (\(lq\fB'\fP\(rq) and double quotes (\(lq\fB"\fP\(rq)
37 can be used to quote strings which contain spaces or other special
38 characters.  The difference between the two types of quotes is
39 similar to that of many popular shell programs, namely that a single
40 quote is used to specify a literal string (one that is not
41 interpreted for shell variables or quoting with a backslash [see
42 next paragraph]), while double quotes indicate a string for which
43 should be evaluated.  For example, backtics are evaluated inside of
44 double quotes, but not for single quotes.
45 .PP
46 \fB\(rs\fP quotes the next character, just as in shells such as bash and zsh.
47 For example, if want to put quotes (\(lq\fB"\fP\(rq) inside of a
48 string, you can use \(lq\fB\(rs\fP\(rq to force the next character
49 to be a literal instead of interpreted character.
50 .PP
51 \(lq\fB\(rs\(rs\fP\(rq means to insert a literal \(lq\fB\(rs\fP\(rq into the
52 line.  \(lq\fB\(rsn\fP\(rq and \(lq\fB\(rsr\fP\(rq have their usual
53 C meanings of linefeed and carriage-return, respectively.
54 .PP
55 A \(lq\fB\(rs\fP\(rq at the end of a line can be used to split commands over
56 multiple lines, provided that the split points don't appear in the
57 middle of command names.
58 .PP
59 It is also possible to substitute the output of a Unix command in an
60 initialization file.  This is accomplished by enclosing the command
61 in backquotes (\fB`\fP\fIcommand\fP\fB`\fP).
62 .PP
63 UNIX environments can be accessed like the way it is done in shells
64 like sh and bash: Prepend the name of the environment by a dollar
65 (\(lq\fB\(Do\fP\(rq) sign.
66 .PP
67 .SH COMMANDS
68 .PP
69 .nf
70 \fBalias\fP \fIkey\fP \fIaddress\fP [\fB,\fP \fIaddress\fP [ ... ]]
71 \fBunalias\fP [\fB * \fP | \fIkey\fP ]
72 .fi
73 .IP
74 \fBalias\fP defines an alias \fIkey\fP for the given addresses.
75 \fBunalias\fP removes the alias corresponding to the given \fIkey\fP or
76 all aliases when \(lq\fB*\fP\(rq is used as an argument.
77 .PP
78 .nf
79 \fBalternates\fP \fIregexp\fP [ \fB,\fP \fIregexp\fP [ ... ]]
80 \fBunalternates\fP [\fB * \fP | \fIregexp\fP [ \fB,\fP \fIregexp\fP [ ... ]] ]
81 .fi
82 .IP
83 \fBalternates\fP is used to inform mutt about alternate addresses
84 where you receive mail; you can use regular expressions to specify
85 alternate addresses.  This affects mutt's idea about messages
86 from you, and messages addressed to you.  \fBunalternates\fP removes
87 a regular expression from the list of known alternates.
88 .PP
89 .nf
90 \fBalternative_order\fP \fItype\fP[\fB/\fP\fIsubtype\fP] [ ... ]
91 \fBunalternative_order\fP [\fB * \fP | \fItype\fP/\fIsubtype\fP] [...]
92 .fi
93 .IP
94 \fBalternative_order\fP command permits you to define an order of preference which is
95 used by mutt to determine which part of a
96 \fBmultipart/alternative\fP body to display.
97 A subtype of \(lq\fB*\fP\(rq matches any subtype, as does an empty
98 subtype.   \fBunalternative_order\fP removes entries from the
99 ordered list or deletes the entire list when \(lq\fB*\fP\(rq is used
100 as an argument.
101 .PP
102 .nf
103 \fBauto_view\fP \fItype\fP[\fB/\fP\fIsubtype\fP] [ ... ]
104 \fBunauto_view\fP \fItype\fP[fB/\fP\fIsubtype\fP] [ ... ]
105 .fi
106 .IP
107 This commands permits you to specify that mutt should automatically
108 convert the given MIME types to text/plain when displaying messages.
109 For this to work, there must be a 
110 .BR mailcap (5)
111 entry for the given MIME type with the 
112 .B copiousoutput
113 flag set.  A subtype of \(lq\fB*\fP\(rq 
114 matches any subtype, as does an empty subtype.
115 .PP
116 .nf
117 \fBmime_lookup\fP \fItype\fP[\fB/\fP\fIsubtype\fP] [ ... ]
118 \fBunmime_lookup\fP \fItype\fP[\fB/\fP\fIsubtype\fP] [ ... ]
119 .fi
120 .IP
121 This command permits you to define a list of "data" MIME content
122 types for which mutt will try to determine the actual file type from
123 the file name, and not use a 
124 .BR mailcap (5)
125 entry given for the original MIME type.  For instance, you may add
126 the \fBapplication/octet-stream\fP MIME type to this list.
127 .TP
128 \fBbind\fP \fImap\fP \fIkey\fP \fIfunction\fP
129 This command binds the given \fIkey\fP for the given \fImap\fP to
130 the given \fIfunction\fP.
131 .IP
132 Valid maps are:
133 .BR generic ", " alias ", " attach ", " 
134 .BR browser ", " editor ", "
135 .BR index ", " compose ", " 
136 .BR pager ", " pgp ", " postpone ", "
137 .BR mix .
138 .IP
139 For more information on keys and functions, please consult the Mutt
140 Manual.
141 .TP
142 \fBaccount-hook\fP [\fB!\fP]\fIregexp\fP \fIcommand\fP
143 This hook is executed whenever you access a remote mailbox. Useful
144 to adjust configuration settings to different IMAP or POP servers.
145 .TP
146 \fBcharset-hook\fP \fIalias\fP \fIcharset\fP
147 This command defines an alias for a character set.  This is useful
148 to properly display messages which are tagged with a character set
149 name not known to mutt.
150 .TP
151 \fBiconv-hook\fP \fIcharset\fP \fIlocal-charset\fP
152 This command defines a system-specific name for a character set.
153 This is useful when your system's 
154 .BR iconv (3)
155 implementation does not understand MIME character set names (such as 
156 .BR iso-8859-1 ),
157 but instead insists on being fed with implementation-specific
158 character set names (such as
159 .BR 8859-1 ).
160 In this specific case, you'd put this into your configuration file:
161 .IP
162 .B "iconv-hook iso-8859-1 8859-1"
163 .TP
164 \fBmessage-hook\fP [\fB!\fP]\fIpattern\fP \fIcommand\fP
165 Before mutt displays (or formats for replying or forwarding) a
166 message which matches the given \fIpattern\fP (or, when it is
167 preceded by an exclamation mark, does not match the \fIpattern\fP),
168 the given \fIcommand\fP is executed.  When multiple
169 \fBmessage-hook\fPs match, they are  executed  in  the order in
170 which they occur in the configuration file.
171 .TP
172 \fBfolder-hook\fP [\fB!\fP]\fIregexp\fP \fIcommand\fP
173 When mutt enters a folder which matches \fIregexp\fP (or, when
174 \fIregexp\fP is preceded by an exclamation mark, does not match
175 \fIregexp\fP), the given \fIcommand\fP is executed.
176 .IP
177 When several \fBfolder-hook\fPs match a given mail folder, they are
178 executed in the order given in the configuration file.
179 .TP
180 \fBmacro\fP \fImap\fP \fIkey\fP \fIsequence\fP [ \fIdescription\fP ]
181 This command binds the given \fIsequence\fP of keys to the given
182 \fIkey\fP in the given \fImap\fP.  For valid maps, see \fBbind\fP.
183 .PP
184 .nf
185 \fBcolor\fP \fIobject\fP \fIforeground\fP \fIbackground\fP [ \fI regexp\fP ]
186 \fBcolor\fP index \fIforeground\fP \fIbackground\fP [ \fI pattern\fP ]
187 \fBuncolor\fP index \fIpattern\fP [ \fIpattern\fP ... ]
188 .fi
189 .IP
190 If your terminal supports color, these commands can be used to
191 assign \fIforeground\fP/\fIbackgound\fP combinations to certain
192 objects.  Valid objects are:
193 .BR attachment ", " body ", " bold ", " header ", "
194 .BR hdrdefault ", " index ", " indicator ", " markers ", "
195 .BR message ", " normal ", " quoted ", " quoted\fIN\fP ", "
196 .BR search ", " signature ", " status ", " tilde ", " tree ", "
197 .BR underline .
198 The
199 .BR body " and " header
200 objects allow you to restrict the colorization to a regular
201 expression.  The \fBindex\fP object permits you to select colored
202 messages by pattern.
203 .IP
204 Valid colors include:
205 .BR white ", " black ", " green ", " magenta ", " blue ", "
206 .BR cyan ", " yellow ", " red ", " default ", " color\fIN\fP .
207 .PP
208 .nf
209 \fBmono\fP \fIobject\fP \fIattribute\fP [ \fIregexp\fP ]
210 \fBmono\fP index \fIattribute\fP [ \fIpattern\fP ]
211 .fi
212 .IP
213 For terminals which don't support color, you can still assign
214 attributes to objects.  Valid attributes include:
215 .BR none ", " bold ", " underline ", " 
216 .BR reverse ", and " standout .
217 .TP
218 [\fBun\fP]\fBignore\fP \fIpattern\fP [ \fIpattern\fP ... ]
219 The \fBignore\fP command permits you to specify header fields which
220 you usually don't wish to see.  Any header field whose tag
221 \fIbegins\fP with an \(lqignored\(rq pattern will be ignored.
222 .IP
223 The \fBunignore\fP command permits you to define exceptions from
224 the above mentioned list of ignored headers.
225 .PP
226 .nf
227 \fBlists\fP \fIregexp\fP [ \fIregexp\fP ... ]
228 \fBunlists\fP \fIregexp\fP [ \fIregexp\fP ... ]
229 \fBsubscribe\fP \fIregexp\fP [ \fIregexp\fP ... ]
230 \fBunsubscribe\fP \fIregexp\fP [ \fIregexp\fP ... ]
231 .fi
232 .IP
233 Mutt maintains two lists of mailing list address patterns, a list of
234 subscribed mailing lists, and a list of known mailing lists.  All
235 subscribed mailing lists are known.  Patterns use regular expressions.
236 .IP
237 The \fBlists\fP command adds a mailing list address to the list of
238 known mailing lists.  The \fBunlists\fP command removes a mailing
239 list from the lists of known and subscribed mailing lists.  The
240 \fBsubscribe\fP command adds a mailing list to the lists of known
241 and subscribed mailing lists.  The \fBunsubscribe\fP command removes
242 it from the list of subscribed mailing lists.
243 .TP
244 \fBmbox-hook\fP [\fB!\fP]\fIpattern\fP \fImailbox\fP
245 When mutt changes to a mail folder which matches \fIpattern\fP,
246 \fImailbox\fP will be used as the \(lqmbox\(rq folder, i.e., read
247 messages will be moved to that folder when the mail folder is left.
248 .IP
249 The first matching \fBmbox-hook\fP applies.
250 .PP
251 .nf
252 \fBmailboxes\fP \fIfilename\fP [ \fIfilename\fP ... ]
253 \fBunmailboxes\fP [ \fB*\fP | \fIfilename\fP ... ]
254 .fi
255 .IP
256 The \fBmailboxes\fP specifies folders which can receive mail and which will
257 be checked for new messages.  When changing folders, pressing space
258 will cycle through folders with new mail.  The \fBunmailboxes\fP
259 command is used to remove a file name from the list of folders which
260 can receive mail.  If "\fB*\fP" is specified as the file name, the
261 list is emptied.
262 .PP
263 .nf
264 \fBmy_hdr\fP \fIstring\fP
265 \fBunmy_hdr\fP \fIfield\fP
266 .fi
267 .IP
268 Using \fBmy_hdr\fP, you can define headers which will be added to
269 the messages you compose.  \fBunmy_hdr\fP will remove the given
270 user-defined headers.
271 .TP
272 \fBhdr_order\fP \fIheader1\fP \fIheader2\fP [ ... ]
273 With this command, you can specify an order in which mutt will
274 attempt to present headers to you when viewing messages.
275 .TP
276 \fBsave-hook\fP [\fB!\fP]\fIpattern\fP \fIfilename\fP
277 When a message matches \fIpattern\fP, the default file name when
278 saving it will be the given \fIfilename\fP.
279 .TP
280 \fBfcc-hook\fP [\fB!\fP]\fIpattern\fP \fIfilename\fP
281 When an outgoing message matches \fIpattern\fP, the default file
282 name for storing a copy (fcc) will be the given \fIfilename\fP.
283 .TP
284 \fBfcc-save-hook\fP [\fB!\fP]\fIpattern\fP \fIfilename\fP
285 This command is an abbreviation for identical \fBfcc-hook\fP and
286 \fBsave-hook\fP commands.
287 .TP
288 \fBsend-hook\fP [\fB!\fP]\fIpattern\fP \fIcommand\fP
289 When composing a message matching \fIpattern\fP, \fIcommand\fP is
290 executed.  When multiple \fBsend-hook\fPs match, they are executed
291 in the order in which they occur in the configuration file.
292 .TP
293 \fBcrypt-hook\fP \fIpattern\fP \fIkey-id\fP
294 The crypt-hook command provides a method by which you can
295 specify the ID of the public key to be used when encrypting messages
296 to a certain recipient.  The meaning of "key ID" is to be taken
297 broadly: This can be a different e-mail address, a numerical key ID,
298 or even just an arbitrary search string.
299 .TP
300 \fBpush\fP \fIstring\fP
301 This command adds the named \fIstring\fP to the keyboard buffer.
302 .PP
303 .nf
304 \fBset\fP [\fBno\fP|\fBinv\fP]\fIvariable\fP[=\fIvalue\fP] [ ... ]
305 \fBtoggle\fP \fIvariable\fP [ ... ]
306 \fBunset\fP \fIvariable\fP [ ... ]
307 \fBreset\fP \fIvariable\fP [ ... ]
308 .fi
309 .IP
310 These commands are used to set and manipulate configuration
311 varibles.
312 .IP
313 Mutt knows four basic types of variables: boolean, number, string
314 and quadoption.  Boolean variables can be \fBset\fP (true),
315 \fBunset\fP (false), or \fBtoggle\fPd. Number variables can be assigned
316 a positive integer value.
317 .IP
318 String variables consist of any number of printable characters.
319 Strings must be enclosed in quotes if they contain spaces or tabs.
320 You may also use the \(lqC\(rq escape sequences \fB\\n\fP and
321 \fB\\t\fP for newline and tab, respectively.
322 .IP
323 Quadoption variables are used to control whether or not to be
324 prompted for certain actions, or to specify a default action.  A
325 value of \fByes\fP will cause the action to be carried out automatically
326 as if you had answered yes to the question.  Similarly, a value of
327 \fBno\fP will cause the the action to be carried out as if you had
328 answered \(lqno.\(rq A value of \fBask-yes\fP will cause a prompt
329 with a default answer of \(lqyes\(rq and \fBask-no\fP will provide a
330 default answer of \(lqno.\(rq
331 .IP
332 The \fBreset\fP command resets all given variables to the compile
333 time defaults.  If you reset the special variabe \fBall\fP, all
334 variables will reset to their system defaults.
335 .TP
336 \fBsource\fP \fIfilename\fP
337 The given file will be evaluated as a configuration file.
338 .TP
339 \fBunhook\fP [\fB * \fP | \fIhook-type\fP ]
340 This command will remove all hooks of a given type, or all hooks
341 when \(lq\fB*\fP\(rq is used as an argument.  \fIhook-type\fP
342 can be any of the \fB-hook\fP commands documented above.
343 .SH PATTERNS
344 .PP
345 In various places with mutt, including some of the abovementioned
346 \fBhook\fP commands, you can specify patterns to match messages.
347 .SS Constructing Patterns
348 .PP
349 A simple pattern consists of an operator of the form
350 \(lq\fB~\fP\fIcharacter\fP\(rq, possibly followed by a parameter
351 against which mutt is supposed to match the object specified by
352 this operator.  (For a list of operators, see below.)
353 .PP
354 With some of these operators, the object to be matched consists of
355 several e-mail addresses.  In these cases, the object is matched if
356 at least one of these e-mail addresses matches. You can prepend a
357 hat (\(lq\fB^\fP\(rq) character to such a pattern to indicate that
358 \fIall\fP addresses must match in order to match the object.
359 .PP
360 You can construct complex patterns by combining simple patterns with
361 logical operators.  Logical AND is specified by simply concatenating
362 two simple patterns, for instance \(lq~C mutt-dev ~s bug\(rq.
363 Logical OR is specified by inserting a vertical bar (\(lq\fB|\fP\(rq)
364 between two patterns, for instance \(lq~C mutt-dev | ~s bug\(rq.
365 Additionally, you can negate a pattern by prepending a bang
366 (\(lq\fB!\fP\(rq) character.  For logical grouping, use braces
367 (\(lq()\(rq). Example: \(lq!(~t mutt|~c mutt) ~f elkins\(rq.
368 .SS Simple Patterns
369 .PP
370 Mutt understands the following simple patterns:
371 .PP
372 .TS
373 l l.
374 ~A      all messages
375 ~b \fIEXPR\fP   messages which contain \fIEXPR\fP in the message body
376 ~B \fIEXPR\fP   messages which contain \fIEXPR\fP in the whole message
377 ~c \fIEXPR\fP   messages carbon-copied to \fIEXPR\fP
378 ~C \fIEXPR\fP   message is either to: or cc: \fIEXPR\fP
379 ~D      deleted messages
380 ~d \fIMIN\fP-\fIMAX\fP  messages with \(lqdate-sent\(rq in a Date range
381 ~E      expired messages
382 ~e \fIEXPR\fP   message which contains \fIEXPR\fP in the \(lqSender\(rq field
383 ~F      flagged messages
384 ~f \fIEXPR\fP   messages originating from \fIEXPR\fP
385 ~g      PGP signed messages
386 ~G      PGP encrypted messages
387 ~h \fIEXPR\fP   messages which contain \fIEXPR\fP in the message header
388 ~k      message contains PGP key material
389 ~i \fIEXPR\fP   message which match \fIEXPR\fP in the \(lqMessage-ID\(rq field
390 ~L \fIEXPR\fP   message is either originated or received by \fIEXPR\fP
391 ~l      message is addressed to a known mailing list
392 ~m \fIMIN\fP-\fIMAX\fP  message in the range \fIMIN\fP to \fIMAX\fP
393 ~n \fIMIN\fP-\fIMAX\fP  messages with a score in the range \fIMIN\fP to \fIMAX\fP
394 ~N      new messages
395 ~O      old messages
396 ~p      message is addressed to you (consults $alternates)
397 ~P      message is from you (consults $alternates)
398 ~Q      messages which have been replied to
399 ~R      read messages
400 ~r \fIMIN\fP-\fIMAX\fP  messages with \(lqdate-received\(rq in a Date range
401 ~S      superseded messages
402 ~s \fIEXPR\fP   messages having \fIEXPR\fP in the \(lqSubject\(rq field.
403 ~T      tagged messages
404 ~t \fIEXPR\fP   messages addressed to \fIEXPR\fP
405 ~U      unread messages
406 ~v      message is part of a collapsed thread.
407 ~x \fIEXPR\fP   messages which contain \fIEXPR\fP in the \(lqReferences\(rq field
408 ~z \fIMIN\fP-\fIMAX\fP  messages with a size in the range \fIMIN\fP to \fIMAX\fP
409 ~=      duplicated messages (see $duplicate_threads)
410 .TE
411 .PP
412 In the above, \fIEXPR\fP is a regular expression.
413 .PP
414 With the \fB~m\fP, \fB~n\fP, and \fB~z\fP operators, you can also
415 specify ranges in the forms \fB<\fP\fIMAX\fP, \fB>\fP\fIMIN\fP,
416 \fIMIN\fP\fB-\fP, and \fB-\fP\fIMAX\fP.
417 .SS Matching dates
418 .PP
419 The \fB~d\fP and \fB~r\fP operators are used to match date ranges,
420 which are interpreted to be given in your local time zone.
421 .PP
422 A date is of the form
423 \fIDD\fP[\fB/\fP\fIMM\fP[\fB/\fP[\fIcc\fP]\fIYY\fP]], that is, a
424 two-digit date, optionally followed by a two-digit month, optionally
425 followed by a year specifications.  Omitted fields default to the
426 current month and year.
427 .PP
428 Mutt understands either two or four digit year specifications.  When
429 given a two-digit year, mutt will interpret values less than 70 as
430 lying in the 21st century (i.e., \(lq38\(rq means 2038 and not 1938,
431 and \(lq00\(rq is interpreted as 2000), and values
432 greater than or equal to 70 as lying in the 20th century.
433 .PP
434 Note that this behaviour \fIis\fP Y2K compliant, but that mutt
435 \fIdoes\fP have a Y2.07K problem.
436 .PP
437 If a date range consists of a single date, the operator in question
438 will match that precise date.  If the date range consists of a dash
439 (\(lq\fB-\fP\(rq), followed by a date, this range will match any
440 date before and up to the date given.  Similarly, a date followed by
441 a dash matches the date given and any later point of time.  Two
442 dates, separated by a dash, match any date which lies in the given
443 range of time.
444 .PP
445 You can also modify any absolute date by giving an error range.  An
446 error range consists of one of the characters
447 .BR + ,
448 .BR - ,
449 .BR * ,
450 followed by a positive number, followed by one of the unit
451 characters
452 .BR y ,
453 .BR m ,
454 .BR w ", or"
455 .BR d ,
456 specifying a unit of years, months, weeks, or days.  
457 .B +
458 increases the maximum date matched by the given interval of time,
459 .B - 
460 decreases the minimum date matched by the given interval of time, and
461 .B *
462 increases the maximum date and decreases the minimum date matched by
463 the given interval of time.  It is possible to give multiple error
464 margins, which cumulate.  Example:
465 .B "1/1/2001-1w+2w*3d"
466 .PP
467 You can also specify offsets relative to the current date.  An
468 offset is specified as one of the characters
469 .BR < ,
470 .BR > ,
471 .BR = ,
472 followed by a positive number, followed by one of the unit
473 characters
474 .BR y ,
475 .BR m ,
476 .BR w ", or"
477 .BR d .
478 .B >
479 matches dates which are older than the specified amount of time, an
480 offset which begins with the character
481 .B < 
482 matches dates which are more recent than the specified amount of time,
483 and an offset which begins with the character
484 .B =
485 matches points of time which are precisely the given amount of time
486 ago.
487 .SH CONFIGURATION VARIABLES
488
489 .TP
490 .B abort_nosubject
491 .nf
492 Type: quadoption
493 Default: ask-yes
494 .fi
495 .IP
496 If set to \fIyes\fP, when composing messages and no subject is given
497 at the subject prompt, composition will be aborted.  If set to
498 \fIno\fP, composing messages with no subject given at the subject
499 prompt will never be aborted.
500
501
502 .TP
503 .B abort_unmodified
504 .nf
505 Type: quadoption
506 Default: yes
507 .fi
508 .IP
509 If set to \fIyes\fP, composition will automatically abort after
510 editing the message body if no changes are made to the file (this
511 check only happens after the \fIfirst\fP edit of the file).  When set
512 to \fIno\fP, composition will never be aborted.
513
514
515 .TP
516 .B alias_file
517 .nf
518 Type: path
519 Default: \(lq~/.muttrc\(rq
520 .fi
521 .IP
522 The default file in which to save aliases created by the 
523 \(lqcreate-alias\(rq function.
524 .IP
525 \fBNote:\fP Mutt will not automatically source this file; you must
526 explicitly use the \(lqsource\(rq command for it to be executed.
527
528
529 .TP
530 .B alias_format
531 .nf
532 Type: string
533 Default: \(lq%4n %2f %t %-10a   %r\(rq
534 .fi
535 .IP
536 Specifies the format of the data displayed for the `alias' menu.  The
537 following printf(3)-style sequences are available:
538 .IP
539
540 .RS
541 .IP %a 
542 alias name
543
544 .IP %f 
545 flags - currently, a \(rqd\(rq for an alias marked for deletion
546
547 .IP %n 
548 index number
549
550 .IP %r 
551 address which alias expands to
552
553 .IP %t 
554 character which indicates if the alias is tagged for inclusion
555
556 .RE
557
558 .TP
559 .B allow_8bit
560 .nf
561 Type: boolean
562 Default: yes
563 .fi
564 .IP
565 Controls whether 8-bit data is converted to 7-bit using either Quoted-
566 Printable or Base64 encoding when sending mail.
567
568
569 .TP
570 .B allow_ansi
571 .nf
572 Type: boolean
573 Default: no
574 .fi
575 .IP
576 Controls whether ANSI color codes in messages (and color tags in 
577 rich text messages) are to be interpreted.
578 Messages containing these codes are rare, but if this option is set,
579 their text will be colored accordingly. Note that this may override
580 your color choices, and even present a security problem, since a
581 message could include a line like \(rq[-- PGP output follows ...\(rq and
582 give it the same color as your attachment color.
583
584
585 .TP
586 .B arrow_cursor
587 .nf
588 Type: boolean
589 Default: no
590 .fi
591 .IP
592 When set, an arrow (\(lq->\(rq) will be used to indicate the current entry
593 in menus instead of highlighting the whole line.  On slow network or modem
594 links this will make response faster because there is less that has to
595 be redrawn on the screen when moving to the next or previous entries
596 in the menu.
597
598
599 .TP
600 .B ascii_chars
601 .nf
602 Type: boolean
603 Default: no
604 .fi
605 .IP
606 If set, Mutt will use plain ASCII characters when displaying thread
607 and attachment trees, instead of the default \fIACS\fP characters.
608
609
610 .TP
611 .B askbcc
612 .nf
613 Type: boolean
614 Default: no
615 .fi
616 .IP
617 If set, Mutt will prompt you for blind-carbon-copy (Bcc) recipients
618 before editing an outgoing message.
619
620
621 .TP
622 .B askcc
623 .nf
624 Type: boolean
625 Default: no
626 .fi
627 .IP
628 If set, Mutt will prompt you for carbon-copy (Cc) recipients before
629 editing the body of an outgoing message.
630
631
632 .TP
633 .B ask_follow_up
634 .nf
635 Type: boolean
636 Default: no
637 .fi
638 .IP
639 If set, Mutt will prompt you for follow-up groups before editing
640 the body of an outgoing message.
641
642
643 .TP
644 .B ask_x_comment_to
645 .nf
646 Type: boolean
647 Default: no
648 .fi
649 .IP
650 If set, Mutt will prompt you for x-comment-to field before editing
651 the body of an outgoing message.
652
653
654 .TP
655 .B attach_format
656 .nf
657 Type: string
658 Default: \(lq%u%D%I %t%4n %T%.40d%> [%.7m/%.10M, %.6e%?C?, %C?, %s] \(rq
659 .fi
660 .IP
661 This variable describes the format of the `attachment' menu.  The
662 following printf-style sequences are understood:
663 .IP
664
665 .RS
666 .IP %C  
667 charset
668
669 .IP %c  
670 reqiures charset conversion (n or c)
671
672 .IP %D  
673 deleted flag
674
675 .IP %d  
676 description
677
678 .IP %e  
679 MIME content-transfer-encoding
680
681 .IP %f  
682 filename
683
684 .IP %I  
685 disposition (I=inline, A=attachment)
686
687 .IP %m  
688 major MIME type
689
690 .IP %M  
691 MIME subtype
692
693 .IP %n  
694 attachment number
695
696 .IP %s  
697 size
698
699 .IP %t  
700 tagged flag
701
702 .IP %T  
703 graphic tree characters
704
705 .IP %u  
706 unlink (=to delete) flag
707
708 .IP %>X 
709 right justify the rest of the string and pad with character \(rqX\(rq
710
711 .IP %|X 
712 pad to the end of the line with character \(rqX\(rq
713
714 .RE
715
716 .TP
717 .B attach_sep
718 .nf
719 Type: string
720 Default: \(lq\\n\(rq
721 .fi
722 .IP
723 The separator to add between attachments when operating (saving,
724 printing, piping, etc) on a list of tagged attachments.
725
726
727 .TP
728 .B attach_split
729 .nf
730 Type: boolean
731 Default: yes
732 .fi
733 .IP
734 If this variable is unset, when operating (saving, printing, piping,
735 etc) on a list of tagged attachments, Mutt will concatenate the
736 attachments and will operate on them as a single attachment. The
737 \(lq$attach_sep\(rq separator is added after each attachment. When set,
738 Mutt will operate on the attachments one by one.
739
740
741 .TP
742 .B attribution
743 .nf
744 Type: string
745 Default: \(lqOn %d, %n wrote:\(rq
746 .fi
747 .IP
748 This is the string that will precede a message which has been included
749 in a reply.  For a full listing of defined printf()-like sequences see
750 the section on \(lq$index_format\(rq.
751
752
753 .TP
754 .B autoedit
755 .nf
756 Type: boolean
757 Default: no
758 .fi
759 .IP
760 When set along with \(lq$edit_headers\(rq, Mutt will skip the initial
761 send-menu and allow you to immediately begin editing the body of your
762 message.  The send-menu may still be accessed once you have finished
763 editing the body of your message.
764 .IP
765 Also see \(lq$fast_reply\(rq.
766
767
768 .TP
769 .B auto_tag
770 .nf
771 Type: boolean
772 Default: no
773 .fi
774 .IP
775 When set, functions in the \fIindex\fP menu which affect a message
776 will be applied to all tagged messages (if there are any).  When
777 unset, you must first use the tag-prefix function (default: \(rq;\(rq) to
778 make the next function apply to all tagged messages.
779
780
781 .TP
782 .B beep
783 .nf
784 Type: boolean
785 Default: yes
786 .fi
787 .IP
788 When this variable is set, mutt will beep when an error occurs.
789
790
791 .TP
792 .B beep_new
793 .nf
794 Type: boolean
795 Default: no
796 .fi
797 .IP
798 When this variable is set, mutt will beep whenever it prints a message
799 notifying you of new mail.  This is independent of the setting of the
800 \(lq$beep\(rq variable.
801
802
803 .TP
804 .B bounce
805 .nf
806 Type: quadoption
807 Default: ask-yes
808 .fi
809 .IP
810 Controls whether you will be asked to confirm bouncing messages.
811 If set to \fIyes\fP you don't get asked if you want to bounce a
812 message. Setting this variable to \fIno\fP is not generally useful,
813 and thus not recommended, because you are unable to bounce messages.
814
815
816 .TP
817 .B bounce_delivered
818 .nf
819 Type: boolean
820 Default: yes
821 .fi
822 .IP
823 When this variable is set, mutt will include Delivered-To headers when
824 bouncing messages.  Postfix users may wish to unset this variable.
825
826
827 .TP
828 .B catchup_newsgroup
829 .nf
830 Type: quadoption
831 Default: ask-yes
832 .fi
833 .IP
834 If this variable is \fIset\fP, Mutt will mark all articles in newsgroup
835 as read when you quit the newsgroup (catchup newsgroup).
836
837
838 .TP
839 .B charset
840 .nf
841 Type: string
842 Default: \(lq\(rq
843 .fi
844 .IP
845 Character set your terminal uses to display and enter textual data.
846
847
848 .TP
849 .B check_new
850 .nf
851 Type: boolean
852 Default: yes
853 .fi
854 .IP
855 \fBNote:\fP this option only affects \fImaildir\fP and \fIMH\fP style
856 mailboxes.
857 .IP
858 When \fIset\fP, Mutt will check for new mail delivered while the
859 mailbox is open.  Especially with MH mailboxes, this operation can
860 take quite some time since it involves scanning the directory and
861 checking each file to see if it has already been looked at.  If
862 \fIcheck_new\fP is \fIunset\fP, no check for new mail is performed
863 while the mailbox is open.
864
865
866 .TP
867 .B collapse_unread
868 .nf
869 Type: boolean
870 Default: yes
871 .fi
872 .IP
873 When \fIunset\fP, Mutt will not collapse a thread if it contains any
874 unread messages.
875
876
877 .TP
878 .B uncollapse_jump
879 .nf
880 Type: boolean
881 Default: no
882 .fi
883 .IP
884 When \fIset\fP, Mutt will jump to the next unread message, if any,
885 when the current thread is \fIun\fPcollapsed.
886
887
888 .TP
889 .B compose_format
890 .nf
891 Type: string
892 Default: \(lq-- Mutt: Compose  [Approx. msg size: %l   Atts: %a]%>-\(rq
893 .fi
894 .IP
895 Controls the format of the status line displayed in the \\fCompose\fP
896 menu.  This string is similar to \(lq$status_format\(rq, but has its own
897 set of printf()-like sequences:
898 .IP
899
900 .RS
901 .IP %a 
902 total number of attachments 
903
904 .IP %h 
905 local hostname
906
907 .IP %l 
908 approximate size (in bytes) of the current message
909
910 .IP %v 
911 Mutt version string
912
913 .RE
914 .IP
915 See the text describing the \(lq$status_format\(rq option for more 
916 information on how to set \(lq$compose_format\(rq.
917
918
919 .TP
920 .B confirmappend
921 .nf
922 Type: boolean
923 Default: yes
924 .fi
925 .IP
926 When set, Mutt will prompt for confirmation when appending messages to
927 an existing mailbox.
928
929
930 .TP
931 .B confirmcreate
932 .nf
933 Type: boolean
934 Default: yes
935 .fi
936 .IP
937 When set, Mutt will prompt for confirmation when saving messages to a
938 mailbox which does not yet exist before creating it.
939
940
941 .TP
942 .B connect_timeout
943 .nf
944 Type: number
945 Default: 30
946 .fi
947 .IP
948 Causes Mutt to timeout a network connection (for IMAP or POP) after this
949 many seconds if the connection is not able to be established.  A negative
950 value causes Mutt to wait indefinitely for the connection to succeed.
951
952
953 .TP
954 .B content_type
955 .nf
956 Type: string
957 Default: \(lqtext/plain\(rq
958 .fi
959 .IP
960 Sets the default Content-Type for the body of newly composed messages.
961
962
963 .TP
964 .B copy
965 .nf
966 Type: quadoption
967 Default: yes
968 .fi
969 .IP
970 This variable controls whether or not copies of your outgoing messages
971 will be saved for later references.  Also see \(lq$record\(rq,
972 \(lq$save_name\(rq, \(lq$force_name\(rq and \(lqfcc-hook\(rq.
973
974
975 .TP
976 .B crypt_autopgp
977 .nf
978 Type: boolean
979 Default: yes
980 .fi
981 .IP
982 This variable controls whether or not mutt may automatically enable
983 PGP encryption/signing for messages.  See also \(lq$crypt_autoencrypt\(rq,
984 \(lq$crypt_replyencrypt\(rq,
985 \(lq$crypt_autosign\(rq, \(lq$crypt_replysign\(rq and \(lq$smime_is_default\(rq.
986
987
988 .TP
989 .B crypt_autosmime
990 .nf
991 Type: boolean
992 Default: yes
993 .fi
994 .IP
995 This variable controls whether or not mutt may automatically enable
996 S/MIME encryption/signing for messages. See also \(lq$crypt_autoencrypt\(rq,
997 \(lq$crypt_replyencrypt\(rq,
998 \(lq$crypt_autosign\(rq, \(lq$crypt_replysign\(rq and \(lq$smime_is_default\(rq.
999
1000
1001 .TP
1002 .B date_format
1003 .nf
1004 Type: string
1005 Default: \(lq!%a, %b %d, %Y at %I:%M:%S%p %Z\(rq
1006 .fi
1007 .IP
1008 This variable controls the format of the date printed by the \(lq%d\(rq
1009 sequence in \(lq$index_format\(rq.  This is passed to the \fIstrftime\fP
1010 call to process the date. See the man page for \fIstrftime(3)\fP for
1011 the proper syntax.
1012 .IP
1013 Unless the first character in the string is a bang (\(lq!\(rq), the month
1014 and week day names are expanded according to the locale specified in
1015 the variable \(lq$locale\(rq. If the first character in the string is a
1016 bang, the bang is discarded, and the month and week day names in the
1017 rest of the string are expanded in the \fIC\fP locale (that is in US
1018 English).
1019
1020
1021 .TP
1022 .B default_hook
1023 .nf
1024 Type: string
1025 Default: \(lq~f %s !~P | (~P ~C %s)\(rq
1026 .fi
1027 .IP
1028 This variable controls how send-hooks, message-hooks, save-hooks,
1029 and fcc-hooks will
1030 be interpreted if they are specified with only a simple regexp,
1031 instead of a matching pattern.  The hooks are expanded when they are
1032 declared, so a hook will be interpreted according to the value of this
1033 variable at the time the hook is declared.  The default value matches
1034 if the message is either from a user matching the regular expression
1035 given, or if it is from you (if the from address matches
1036 \(lqalternates\(rq) and is to or cc'ed to a user matching the given
1037 regular expression.
1038
1039
1040 .TP
1041 .B delete
1042 .nf
1043 Type: quadoption
1044 Default: ask-yes
1045 .fi
1046 .IP
1047 Controls whether or not messages are really deleted when closing or
1048 synchronizing a mailbox.  If set to \fIyes\fP, messages marked for
1049 deleting will automatically be purged without prompting.  If set to
1050 \fIno\fP, messages marked for deletion will be kept in the mailbox.
1051
1052
1053 .TP
1054 .B delete_untag
1055 .nf
1056 Type: boolean
1057 Default: yes
1058 .fi
1059 .IP
1060 If this option is \fIset\fP, mutt will untag messages when marking them
1061 for deletion.  This applies when you either explicitly delete a message,
1062 or when you save it to another folder.
1063
1064
1065 .TP
1066 .B digest_collapse
1067 .nf
1068 Type: boolean
1069 Default: yes
1070 .fi
1071 .IP
1072 If this option is \fIset\fP, mutt's revattach menu will not show the subparts of
1073 individual messages in a digest.  To see these subparts, press 'v' on that menu.
1074
1075
1076 .TP
1077 .B display_filter
1078 .nf
1079 Type: path
1080 Default: \(lq\(rq
1081 .fi
1082 .IP
1083 When set, specifies a command used to filter messages.  When a message
1084 is viewed it is passed as standard input to $display_filter, and the
1085 filtered message is read from the standard output.
1086
1087
1088 .TP
1089 .B dotlock_program
1090 .nf
1091 Type: path
1092 Default: \(lq/usr/local/bin/mutt_dotlock\(rq
1093 .fi
1094 .IP
1095 Contains the path of the mutt_dotlock (8) binary to be used by
1096 mutt.
1097
1098
1099 .TP
1100 .B dsn_notify
1101 .nf
1102 Type: string
1103 Default: \(lq\(rq
1104 .fi
1105 .IP
1106 \fBNote:\fP you should not enable this unless you are using Sendmail
1107 8.8.x or greater.
1108 .IP
1109 This variable sets the request for when notification is returned.  The
1110 string consists of a comma separated list (no spaces!) of one or more
1111 of the following: \fInever\fP, to never request notification,
1112 \fIfailure\fP, to request notification on transmission failure,
1113 \fIdelay\fP, to be notified of message delays, \fIsuccess\fP, to be
1114 notified of successful transmission.
1115 .IP
1116 Example: set dsn_notify=\(rqfailure,delay\(rq
1117
1118
1119 .TP
1120 .B dsn_return
1121 .nf
1122 Type: string
1123 Default: \(lq\(rq
1124 .fi
1125 .IP
1126 \fBNote:\fP you should not enable this unless you are using Sendmail
1127 8.8.x or greater.
1128 .IP
1129 This variable controls how much of your message is returned in DSN
1130 messages.  It may be set to either \fIhdrs\fP to return just the
1131 message header, or \fIfull\fP to return the full message.
1132 .IP
1133 Example: set dsn_return=hdrs
1134
1135
1136 .TP
1137 .B duplicate_threads
1138 .nf
1139 Type: boolean
1140 Default: yes
1141 .fi
1142 .IP
1143 This variable controls whether mutt, when sorting by threads, threads
1144 messages with the same message-id together.  If it is set, it will indicate
1145 that it thinks they are duplicates of each other with an equals sign
1146 in the thread diagram.
1147
1148
1149 .TP
1150 .B edit_headers
1151 .nf
1152 Type: boolean
1153 Default: no
1154 .fi
1155 .IP
1156 This option allows you to edit the header of your outgoing messages
1157 along with the body of your message.
1158
1159
1160 .TP
1161 .B editor
1162 .nf
1163 Type: path
1164 Default: \(lq\(rq
1165 .fi
1166 .IP
1167 This variable specifies which editor is used by mutt.
1168 It defaults to the value of the VISUAL, or EDITOR, environment
1169 variable, or to the string \(rqvi\(rq if neither of those are set.
1170
1171
1172 .TP
1173 .B encode_from
1174 .nf
1175 Type: boolean
1176 Default: no
1177 .fi
1178 .IP
1179 When \fIset\fP, mutt will quoted-printable encode messages when
1180 they contain the string \(rqFrom \(rq in the beginning of a line.
1181 Useful to avoid the tampering certain mail delivery and transport
1182 agents tend to do with messages.
1183
1184
1185 .TP
1186 .B envelope_from
1187 .nf
1188 Type: boolean
1189 Default: no
1190 .fi
1191 .IP
1192 When \fIset\fP, mutt will try to derive the message's \fIenvelope\fP
1193 sender from the \(rqFrom:\(rq header.  Note that this information is passed 
1194 to sendmail command using the \(rq-f\(rq command line switch, so don't set this
1195 option if you are using that switch in $sendmail yourself,
1196 or if the sendmail on your machine doesn't support that command
1197 line switch.
1198
1199
1200 .TP
1201 .B escape
1202 .nf
1203 Type: string
1204 Default: \(lq~\(rq
1205 .fi
1206 .IP
1207 Escape character to use for functions in the builtin editor.
1208
1209
1210 .TP
1211 .B fast_reply
1212 .nf
1213 Type: boolean
1214 Default: no
1215 .fi
1216 .IP
1217 When set, the initial prompt for recipients and subject are skipped
1218 when replying to messages, and the initial prompt for subject is
1219 skipped when forwarding messages.
1220 .IP
1221 \fBNote:\fP this variable has no effect when the \(lq$autoedit\(rq
1222 variable is set.
1223
1224
1225 .TP
1226 .B fcc_attach
1227 .nf
1228 Type: boolean
1229 Default: yes
1230 .fi
1231 .IP
1232 This variable controls whether or not attachments on outgoing messages
1233 are saved along with the main body of your message.
1234
1235
1236 .TP
1237 .B fcc_clear
1238 .nf
1239 Type: boolean
1240 Default: no
1241 .fi
1242 .IP
1243 When this variable is set, FCCs will be stored unencrypted and
1244 unsigned, even when the actual message is encrypted and/or
1245 signed.
1246 (PGP only)
1247
1248
1249 .TP
1250 .B folder
1251 .nf
1252 Type: path
1253 Default: \(lq~/Mail\(rq
1254 .fi
1255 .IP
1256 Specifies the default location of your mailboxes.  A `+' or `=' at the
1257 beginning of a pathname will be expanded to the value of this
1258 variable.  Note that if you change this variable from the default
1259 value you need to make sure that the assignment occurs \fIbefore\fP
1260 you use `+' or `=' for any other variables since expansion takes place
1261 during the `set' command.
1262
1263
1264 .TP
1265 .B folder_format
1266 .nf
1267 Type: string
1268 Default: \(lq%2C %t %N %F %2l %-8.8u %-8.8g %8s %d %f\(rq
1269 .fi
1270 .IP
1271 This variable allows you to customize the file browser display to your
1272 personal taste.  This string is similar to \(lq$index_format\(rq, but has
1273 its own set of printf()-like sequences:
1274 .IP
1275
1276 .RS
1277 .IP %C  
1278 current file number
1279
1280 .IP %d  
1281 date/time folder was last modified
1282
1283 .IP %f  
1284 filename
1285
1286 .IP %F  
1287 file permissions
1288
1289 .IP %g  
1290 group name (or numeric gid, if missing)
1291
1292 .IP %l  
1293 number of hard links
1294
1295 .IP %N  
1296 N if folder has new mail, blank otherwise
1297
1298 .IP %s  
1299 size in bytes
1300
1301 .IP %t  
1302 * if the file is tagged, blank otherwise
1303
1304 .IP %u  
1305 owner name (or numeric uid, if missing)
1306
1307 .IP %>X 
1308 right justify the rest of the string and pad with character \(rqX\(rq
1309
1310 .IP %|X 
1311 pad to the end of the line with character \(rqX\(rq
1312
1313 .RE
1314
1315 .TP
1316 .B followup_to
1317 .nf
1318 Type: boolean
1319 Default: yes
1320 .fi
1321 .IP
1322 Controls whether or not the \fIMail-Followup-To\fP header field is
1323 generated when sending mail.  When \fIset\fP, Mutt will generate this
1324 field when you are replying to a known mailing list, specified with
1325 the \(lqsubscribe\(rq or \(lqlists\(rq commands.
1326 .IP
1327 This field has two purposes.  First, preventing you from
1328 receiving duplicate copies of replies to messages which you send
1329 to mailing lists, and second, ensuring that you do get a reply
1330 separately for any messages sent to known lists to which you are
1331 not subscribed.  The header will contain only the list's address
1332 for subscribed lists, and both the list address and your own
1333 email address for unsubscribed lists.  Without this header, a
1334 group reply to your message sent to a subscribed list will be
1335 sent to both the list and your address, resulting in two copies
1336 of the same email for you.
1337
1338
1339 .TP
1340 .B followup_to_poster
1341 .nf
1342 Type: quadoption
1343 Default: ask-yes
1344 .fi
1345 .IP
1346 If this variable is \fIset\fP and the keyword \(rqposter\(rq is present in
1347 \fIFollowup-To\fP header, follow-up to newsgroup function is not
1348 permitted.  The message will be mailed to the submitter of the
1349 message via mail.
1350
1351
1352 .TP
1353 .B force_name
1354 .nf
1355 Type: boolean
1356 Default: no
1357 .fi
1358 .IP
1359 This variable is similar to \(lq$save_name\(rq, except that Mutt will
1360 store a copy of your outgoing message by the username of the address
1361 you are sending to even if that mailbox does not exist.
1362 .IP
1363 Also see the \(lq$record\(rq variable.
1364
1365
1366 .TP
1367 .B forward_decode
1368 .nf
1369 Type: boolean
1370 Default: yes
1371 .fi
1372 .IP
1373 Controls the decoding of complex MIME messages into text/plain when
1374 forwarding a message.  The message header is also RFC2047 decoded.
1375 This variable is only used, if \(lq$mime_forward\(rq is \fIunset\fP,
1376 otherwise \(lq$mime_forward_decode\(rq is used instead.
1377
1378
1379 .TP
1380 .B forward_edit
1381 .nf
1382 Type: quadoption
1383 Default: yes
1384 .fi
1385 .IP
1386 This quadoption controls whether or not the user is automatically
1387 placed in the editor when forwarding messages.  For those who always want
1388 to forward with no modification, use a setting of \(lqno\(rq.
1389
1390
1391 .TP
1392 .B forward_format
1393 .nf
1394 Type: string
1395 Default: \(lq[%a: %s]\(rq
1396 .fi
1397 .IP
1398 This variable controls the default subject when forwarding a message.
1399 It uses the same format sequences as the \(lq$index_format\(rq variable.
1400
1401
1402 .TP
1403 .B forward_quote
1404 .nf
1405 Type: boolean
1406 Default: no
1407 .fi
1408 .IP
1409 When \fIset\fP forwarded messages included in the main body of the
1410 message (when \(lq$mime_forward\(rq is \fIunset\fP) will be quoted using
1411 \(lq$indent_string\(rq.
1412
1413
1414 .TP
1415 .B from
1416 .nf
1417 Type: e-mail address
1418 Default: \(lq\(rq
1419 .fi
1420 .IP
1421 When set, this variable contains a default from address.  It
1422 can be overridden using my_hdr (including from send-hooks) and
1423 \(lq$reverse_name\(rq.  This variable is ignored if \(lq$use_from\(rq
1424 is unset.
1425 .IP
1426 Defaults to the contents of the environment variable EMAIL.
1427
1428
1429 .TP
1430 .B gecos_mask
1431 .nf
1432 Type: regular expression
1433 Default: \(lq^[^,]*\(rq
1434 .fi
1435 .IP
1436 A regular expression used by mutt to parse the GECOS field of a password
1437 entry when expanding the alias.  By default the regular expression is set
1438 to \(rq^[^,]*\(rq which will return the string up to the first \(rq,\(rq encountered.
1439 If the GECOS field contains a string like \(rqlastname, firstname\(rq then you
1440 should set the gecos_mask=\(rq.*\(rq.
1441 .IP
1442 This can be useful if you see the following behavior: you address a e-mail
1443 to user ID stevef whose full name is Steve Franklin.  If mutt expands 
1444 stevef to \(rqFranklin\(rq stevef@foo.bar then you should set the gecos_mask to
1445 a regular expression that will match the whole name so mutt will expand
1446 \(rqFranklin\(rq to \(rqFranklin, Steve\(rq.
1447
1448
1449 .TP
1450 .B group_index_format
1451 .nf
1452 Type: string
1453 Default: \(lq%4C %M%N %5s  %-45.45f %d\(rq
1454 .fi
1455 .IP
1456 This variable allows you to customize the newsgroup browser display to
1457 your personal taste.  This string is similar to \(lqindex_format\(rq, but
1458 has its own set of printf()-like sequences:
1459 .IP
1460
1461 .IP
1462 .DS
1463 .sp
1464 .ft CR
1465 .nf
1466 %C      current newsgroup number
1467 %d      description of newsgroup (becomes from server)
1468 %f      newsgroup name
1469 %M      - if newsgroup not allowed for direct post (moderated for example)
1470 %N      N if newsgroup is new, u if unsubscribed, blank otherwise
1471 %n      number of new articles in newsgroup
1472 %s      number of unread articles in newsgroup
1473 %>X     right justify the rest of the string and pad with character \(rqX\(rq
1474 %|X     pad to the end of the line with character \(rqX\(rq
1475
1476 .fi
1477 .ec
1478 .ft P
1479 .sp
1480
1481
1482 .TP
1483 .B hdrs
1484 .nf
1485 Type: boolean
1486 Default: yes
1487 .fi
1488 .IP
1489 When unset, the header fields normally added by the \(lqmy_hdr\(rq
1490 command are not created.  This variable \fImust\fP be unset before
1491 composing a new message or replying in order to take effect.  If set,
1492 the user defined header fields are added to every new message.
1493
1494
1495 .TP
1496 .B header
1497 .nf
1498 Type: boolean
1499 Default: no
1500 .fi
1501 .IP
1502 When set, this variable causes Mutt to include the header
1503 of the message you are replying to into the edit buffer.
1504 The \(lq$weed\(rq setting applies.
1505
1506
1507 .TP
1508 .B help
1509 .nf
1510 Type: boolean
1511 Default: yes
1512 .fi
1513 .IP
1514 When set, help lines describing the bindings for the major functions
1515 provided by each menu are displayed on the first line of the screen.
1516 .IP
1517 \fBNote:\fP The binding will not be displayed correctly if the
1518 function is bound to a sequence rather than a single keystroke.  Also,
1519 the help line may not be updated if a binding is changed while Mutt is
1520 running.  Since this variable is primarily aimed at new users, neither
1521 of these should present a major problem.
1522
1523
1524 .TP
1525 .B hidden_host
1526 .nf
1527 Type: boolean
1528 Default: no
1529 .fi
1530 .IP
1531 When set, mutt will skip the host name part of \(lq$hostname\(rq variable
1532 when adding the domain part to addresses.  This variable does not
1533 affect the generation of Message-IDs, and it will not lead to the 
1534 cut-off of first-level domains.
1535
1536
1537 .TP
1538 .B hide_limited
1539 .nf
1540 Type: boolean
1541 Default: no
1542 .fi
1543 .IP
1544 When set, mutt will not show the presence of messages that are hidden
1545 by limiting, in the thread tree.
1546
1547
1548 .TP
1549 .B hide_missing
1550 .nf
1551 Type: boolean
1552 Default: yes
1553 .fi
1554 .IP
1555 When set, mutt will not show the presence of missing messages in the
1556 thread tree.
1557
1558
1559 .TP
1560 .B hide_top_limited
1561 .nf
1562 Type: boolean
1563 Default: no
1564 .fi
1565 .IP
1566 When set, mutt will not show the presence of messages that are hidden
1567 by limiting, at the top of threads in the thread tree.  Note that when
1568 $hide_missing is set, this option will have no effect.
1569
1570
1571 .TP
1572 .B hide_top_missing
1573 .nf
1574 Type: boolean
1575 Default: yes
1576 .fi
1577 .IP
1578 When set, mutt will not show the presence of missing messages at the
1579 top of threads in the thread tree.  Note that when $hide_limited is
1580 set, this option will have no effect.
1581
1582
1583 .TP
1584 .B history
1585 .nf
1586 Type: number
1587 Default: 10
1588 .fi
1589 .IP
1590 This variable controls the size (in number of strings remembered) of
1591 the string history buffer. The buffer is cleared each time the
1592 variable is set.
1593
1594
1595 .TP
1596 .B honor_followup_to
1597 .nf
1598 Type: quadoption
1599 Default: yes
1600 .fi
1601 .IP
1602 This variable controls whether or not a Mail-Followup-To header is
1603 honored when group-replying to a message.
1604
1605
1606 .TP
1607 .B hostname
1608 .nf
1609 Type: string
1610 Default: \(lq\(rq
1611 .fi
1612 .IP
1613 Specifies the hostname to use after the \(lq@\(rq in local e-mail
1614 addresses.  This overrides the compile time definition obtained from
1615 /etc/resolv.conf.
1616
1617
1618 .TP
1619 .B ignore_list_reply_to
1620 .nf
1621 Type: boolean
1622 Default: no
1623 .fi
1624 .IP
1625 Affects the behaviour of the \fIreply\fP function when replying to
1626 messages from mailing lists.  When set, if the \(lqReply-To:\(rq field is
1627 set to the same value as the \(lqTo:\(rq field, Mutt assumes that the
1628 \(lqReply-To:\(rq field was set by the mailing list to automate responses
1629 to the list, and will ignore this field.  To direct a response to the
1630 mailing list when this option is set, use the \fIlist-reply\fP
1631 function; \fIgroup-reply\fP will reply to both the sender and the
1632 list.
1633
1634
1635 .TP
1636 .B imap_authenticators
1637 .nf
1638 Type: string
1639 Default: \(lq\(rq
1640 .fi
1641 .IP
1642 This is a colon-delimited list of authentication methods mutt may
1643 attempt to use to log in to an IMAP server, in the order mutt should
1644 try them.  Authentication methods are either 'login' or the right
1645 side of an IMAP 'AUTH=xxx' capability string, eg 'digest-md5',
1646 'gssapi' or 'cram-md5'. This parameter is case-insensitive. If this
1647 parameter is unset (the default) mutt will try all available methods,
1648 in order from most-secure to least-secure.
1649 .IP
1650 Example: set imap_authenticators=\(rqgssapi:cram-md5:login\(rq
1651 .IP
1652 \fBNote:\fP Mutt will only fall back to other authentication methods if
1653 the previous methods are unavailable. If a method is available but
1654 authentication fails, mutt will not connect to the IMAP server.
1655
1656
1657 .TP
1658 .B imap_delim_chars
1659 .nf
1660 Type: string
1661 Default: \(lq/.\(rq
1662 .fi
1663 .IP
1664 This contains the list of characters which you would like to treat
1665 as folder separators for displaying IMAP paths. In particular it
1666 helps in using the '=' shortcut for your \fIfolder\fP variable.
1667
1668
1669 .TP
1670 .B imap_force_ssl
1671 .nf
1672 Type: boolean
1673 Default: no
1674 .fi
1675 .IP
1676 If this variable is set, Mutt will always use SSL when
1677 connecting to IMAP servers.
1678
1679
1680 .TP
1681 .B imap_home_namespace
1682 .nf
1683 Type: string
1684 Default: \(lq\(rq
1685 .fi
1686 .IP
1687 You normally want to see your personal folders alongside
1688 your INBOX in the IMAP browser. If you see something else, you may set
1689 this variable to the IMAP path to your folders.
1690
1691
1692 .TP
1693 .B imap_keepalive
1694 .nf
1695 Type: number
1696 Default: 900
1697 .fi
1698 .IP
1699 This variable specifies the maximum amount of time in seconds that mutt
1700 will wait before polling open IMAP connections, to prevent the server
1701 from closing them before mutt has finished with them. The default is
1702 well within the RFC-specified minimum amount of time (30 minutes) before
1703 a server is allowed to do this, but in practice the RFC does get
1704 violated every now and then. Reduce this number if you find yourself
1705 getting disconnected from your IMAP server due to inactivity.
1706
1707
1708 .TP
1709 .B imap_list_subscribed
1710 .nf
1711 Type: boolean
1712 Default: no
1713 .fi
1714 .IP
1715 This variable configures whether IMAP folder browsing will look for
1716 only subscribed folders or all folders.  This can be toggled in the
1717 IMAP browser with the \fItoggle-subscribed\fP function.
1718
1719
1720 .TP
1721 .B imap_pass
1722 .nf
1723 Type: string
1724 Default: \(lq\(rq
1725 .fi
1726 .IP
1727 Specifies the password for your IMAP account.  If unset, Mutt will
1728 prompt you for your password when you invoke the fetch-mail function.
1729 \fBWarning\fP: you should only use this option when you are on a
1730 fairly secure machine, because the superuser can read your muttrc even
1731 if you are the only one who can read the file.
1732
1733
1734 .TP
1735 .B imap_passive
1736 .nf
1737 Type: boolean
1738 Default: yes
1739 .fi
1740 .IP
1741 When set, mutt will not open new IMAP connections to check for new
1742 mail.  Mutt will only check for new mail over existing IMAP
1743 connections.  This is useful if you don't want to be prompted to
1744 user/password pairs on mutt invocation, or if opening the connection
1745 is slow.
1746
1747
1748 .TP
1749 .B imap_peek
1750 .nf
1751 Type: boolean
1752 Default: yes
1753 .fi
1754 .IP
1755 If set, mutt will avoid implicitly marking your mail as read whenever
1756 you fetch a message from the server. This is generally a good thing,
1757 but can make closing an IMAP folder somewhat slower. This option
1758 exists to appease speed freaks.
1759
1760
1761 .TP
1762 .B imap_servernoise
1763 .nf
1764 Type: boolean
1765 Default: yes
1766 .fi
1767 .IP
1768 When set, mutt will display warning messages from the IMAP
1769 server as error messages. Since these messages are often
1770 harmless, or generated due to configuration problems on the
1771 server which are out of the users' hands, you may wish to suppress
1772 them at some point.
1773
1774
1775 .TP
1776 .B imap_user
1777 .nf
1778 Type: string
1779 Default: \(lq\(rq
1780 .fi
1781 .IP
1782 Your login name on the IMAP server.
1783 .IP
1784 This variable defaults to your user name on the local machine.
1785
1786
1787 .TP
1788 .B implicit_autoview
1789 .nf
1790 Type: boolean
1791 Default: no
1792 .fi
1793 .IP
1794 If set to \(lqyes\(rq, mutt will look for a mailcap entry with the
1795 copiousoutput flag set for \fIevery\fP MIME attachment it doesn't have
1796 an internal viewer defined for.  If such an entry is found, mutt will
1797 use the viewer defined in that entry to convert the body part to text
1798 form.
1799
1800
1801 .TP
1802 .B include
1803 .nf
1804 Type: quadoption
1805 Default: ask-yes
1806 .fi
1807 .IP
1808 Controls whether or not a copy of the message(s) you are replying to
1809 is included in your reply.
1810
1811
1812 .TP
1813 .B indent_string
1814 .nf
1815 Type: string
1816 Default: \(lq> \(rq
1817 .fi
1818 .IP
1819 Specifies the string to prepend to each line of text quoted in a
1820 message to which you are replying.  You are strongly encouraged not to
1821 change this value, as it tends to agitate the more fanatical netizens.
1822
1823
1824 .TP
1825 .B index_format
1826 .nf
1827 Type: string
1828 Default: \(lq%4C %Z %{%b %d} %-15.15L (%?l?%4l&%4c?) %s\(rq
1829 .fi
1830 .IP
1831 This variable allows you to customize the message index display to
1832 your personal taste.
1833 .IP
1834 \(lqFormat strings\(rq are similar to the strings used in the \(lqC\(rq
1835 function printf to format output (see the man page for more detail).
1836 The following sequences are defined in Mutt:
1837 .IP
1838
1839 .RS
1840 .IP %a 
1841 address of the author
1842
1843 .IP %A 
1844 reply-to address (if present; otherwise: address of author)
1845
1846 .IP %b 
1847 filename of the original message folder (think mailBox)
1848
1849 .IP %B 
1850 the list to which the letter was sent, or else the folder name (%b).
1851
1852 .IP %c 
1853 number of characters (bytes) in the message
1854
1855 .IP %C 
1856 current message number
1857
1858 .IP %d 
1859 date and time of the message in the format specified by
1860 \(lqdate_format\(rq converted to sender's time zone
1861
1862 .IP %D 
1863 date and time of the message in the format specified by
1864 \(lqdate_format\(rq converted to the local time zone
1865
1866 .IP %e 
1867 current message number in thread
1868
1869 .IP %E 
1870 number of messages in current thread
1871
1872 .IP %f 
1873 entire From: line (address + real name)
1874
1875 .IP %F 
1876 author name, or recipient name if the message is from you
1877
1878 .IP %g 
1879 newsgroup name (if compiled with nntp support)
1880
1881 .IP %i 
1882 message-id of the current message
1883
1884 .IP %l 
1885 number of lines in the message (does not work with maildir,
1886 mh, and possibly IMAP folders)
1887
1888 .IP %L 
1889 If an address in the To or CC header field matches an address
1890 defined by the users \(lqsubscribe\(rq command, this displays
1891 \(rqTo <list-name>\(rq, otherwise the same as %F.
1892
1893 .IP %m 
1894 total number of message in the mailbox
1895
1896 .IP %M 
1897 number of hidden messages if the thread is collapsed.
1898
1899 .IP %N 
1900 message score
1901
1902 .IP %n 
1903 author's real name (or address if missing)
1904
1905 .IP %O 
1906 (_O_riginal save folder)  Where mutt would formerly have
1907 stashed the message: list name or recipient name if no list
1908
1909 .IP %s 
1910 subject of the message
1911
1912 .IP %S 
1913 status of the message (N/D/d/!/r/*)
1914
1915 .IP %t 
1916 `to:' field (recipients)
1917
1918 .IP %T 
1919 the appropriate character from the $to_chars string
1920
1921 .IP %u 
1922 user (login) name of the author
1923
1924 .IP %v 
1925 first name of the author, or the recipient if the message is from you
1926
1927 .IP %W 
1928 name of organization of author (`organization:' field)
1929
1930 .IP %y 
1931 `x-label:' field, if present
1932
1933 .IP %Y 
1934 `x-label' field, if present, and (1) not at part of a thread tree,
1935 (2) at the top of a thread, or (3) `x-label' is different from
1936 preceding message's `x-label'.
1937
1938 .IP %Z 
1939 message status flags
1940
1941 .IP %{fmt} 
1942 the date and time of the message is converted to sender's
1943 time zone, and \(lqfmt\(rq is expanded by the library function
1944 \(lqstrftime\(rq; a leading bang disables locales
1945
1946 .IP %[fmt] 
1947 the date and time of the message is converted to the local
1948 time zone, and \(lqfmt\(rq is expanded by the library function
1949 \(lqstrftime\(rq; a leading bang disables locales
1950
1951 .IP %(fmt) 
1952 the local date and time when the message was received.
1953 \(lqfmt\(rq is expanded by the library function \(lqstrftime\(rq;
1954 a leading bang disables locales
1955
1956 .IP %<fmt> 
1957 the current local time. \(lqfmt\(rq is expanded by the library
1958 function \(lqstrftime\(rq; a leading bang disables locales.
1959
1960 .IP %>X    
1961 right justify the rest of the string and pad with character \(rqX\(rq
1962
1963 .IP %|X    
1964 pad to the end of the line with character \(rqX\(rq
1965
1966 .RE
1967 .IP
1968 See also: \(lq$to_chars\(rq.
1969
1970
1971 .TP
1972 .B inews
1973 .nf
1974 Type: path
1975 Default: \(lq\(rq
1976 .fi
1977 .IP
1978 If set, specifies the program and arguments used to deliver news posted
1979 by Mutt.  Otherwise, mutt posts article using current connection to
1980 news server.  The following printf-style sequence is understood:
1981 .IP
1982
1983 .IP
1984 .DS
1985 .sp
1986 .ft CR
1987 .nf
1988 %s      newsserver name
1989
1990 .fi
1991 .ec
1992 .ft P
1993 .sp
1994 .IP
1995 Example: set inews=\(rq/usr/local/bin/inews -hS\(rq
1996
1997
1998 .TP
1999 .B ispell
2000 .nf
2001 Type: path
2002 Default: \(lq/usr/bin/ispell\(rq
2003 .fi
2004 .IP
2005 How to invoke ispell (GNU's spell-checking software).
2006
2007
2008 .TP
2009 .B keep_flagged
2010 .nf
2011 Type: boolean
2012 Default: no
2013 .fi
2014 .IP
2015 If set, read messages marked as flagged will not be moved
2016 from your spool mailbox to your \(lq$mbox\(rq mailbox, or as a result of
2017 a \(lqmbox-hook\(rq command.
2018
2019
2020 .TP
2021 .B locale
2022 .nf
2023 Type: string
2024 Default: \(lqC\(rq
2025 .fi
2026 .IP
2027 The locale used by \fIstrftime(3)\fP to format dates. Legal values are
2028 the strings your system accepts for the locale variable \fILC_TIME\fP.
2029
2030
2031 .TP
2032 .B list_reply
2033 .nf
2034 Type: quadoption
2035 Default: no
2036 .fi
2037 .IP
2038 When set, address replies to the mailing list the original message came
2039 from (instead to the author only). Setting this option to \(lqask-yes\(rq or
2040 \(lqask-no\(rq will ask if you really intended to reply to the author only.
2041
2042
2043 .TP
2044 .B mail_check
2045 .nf
2046 Type: number
2047 Default: 5
2048 .fi
2049 .IP
2050 This variable configures how often (in seconds) mutt should look for
2051 new mail.
2052
2053
2054 .TP
2055 .B mailcap_path
2056 .nf
2057 Type: string
2058 Default: \(lq\(rq
2059 .fi
2060 .IP
2061 This variable specifies which files to consult when attempting to
2062 display MIME bodies not directly supported by Mutt.
2063
2064
2065 .TP
2066 .B mailcap_sanitize
2067 .nf
2068 Type: boolean
2069 Default: yes
2070 .fi
2071 .IP
2072 If set, mutt will restrict possible characters in mailcap % expandos
2073 to a well-defined set of safe characters.  This is the safe setting,
2074 but we are not sure it doesn't break some more advanced MIME stuff.
2075 .IP
2076 \fBDON'T CHANGE THIS SETTING UNLESS YOU ARE REALLY SURE WHAT YOU ARE
2077 DOING!\fP
2078
2079
2080 .TP
2081 .B maildir_trash
2082 .nf
2083 Type: boolean
2084 Default: no
2085 .fi
2086 .IP
2087 If set, messages marked as deleted will be saved with the maildir
2088 (T)rashed flag instead of unlinked.  \fBNOTE:\fP this only applies
2089 to maildir-style mailboxes.  Setting it will have no effect on other
2090 mailbox types.
2091
2092
2093 .TP
2094 .B mark_old
2095 .nf
2096 Type: boolean
2097 Default: yes
2098 .fi
2099 .IP
2100 Controls whether or not mutt marks \fInew\fP \fBunread\fP
2101 messages as \fIold\fP if you exit a mailbox without reading them.
2102 With this option set, the next time you start mutt, the messages
2103 will show up with an \(rqO\(rq next to them in the index menu,
2104 indicating that they are old.
2105
2106
2107 .TP
2108 .B markers
2109 .nf
2110 Type: boolean
2111 Default: yes
2112 .fi
2113 .IP
2114 Controls the display of wrapped lines in the internal pager. If set, a
2115 \(lq+\(rq marker is displayed at the beginning of wrapped lines. Also see
2116 the \(lq$smart_wrap\(rq variable.
2117
2118
2119 .TP
2120 .B mask
2121 .nf
2122 Type: regular expression
2123 Default: \(lq!^\\.[^.]\(rq
2124 .fi
2125 .IP
2126 A regular expression used in the file browser, optionally preceded by
2127 the \fInot\fP operator \(lq!\(rq.  Only files whose names match this mask
2128 will be shown. The match is always case-sensitive.
2129
2130
2131 .TP
2132 .B mbox
2133 .nf
2134 Type: path
2135 Default: \(lq~/mbox\(rq
2136 .fi
2137 .IP
2138 This specifies the folder into which read mail in your \(lq$spoolfile\(rq
2139 folder will be appended.
2140
2141
2142 .TP
2143 .B sidebar_visible
2144 .nf
2145 Type: boolean
2146 Default: no
2147 .fi
2148 .IP
2149 This specifies whether or not to show the mailbox list pane.
2150
2151
2152 .TP
2153 .B sidebar_width
2154 .nf
2155 Type: number
2156 Default: 0
2157 .fi
2158 .IP
2159 The width of the mailbox list pane (left sidebar like in GUIs).
2160
2161
2162 .TP
2163 .B mbox_type
2164 .nf
2165 Type: folder magic
2166 Default: mbox
2167 .fi
2168 .IP
2169 The default mailbox type used when creating new folders. May be any of
2170 mbox, MMDF, MH and Maildir.
2171
2172
2173 .TP
2174 .B metoo
2175 .nf
2176 Type: boolean
2177 Default: no
2178 .fi
2179 .IP
2180 If unset, Mutt will remove your address (see the \(lqalternates\(rq
2181 command) from the list of recipients when replying to a message.
2182
2183
2184 .TP
2185 .B menu_scroll
2186 .nf
2187 Type: boolean
2188 Default: no
2189 .fi
2190 .IP
2191 When \fIset\fP, menus will be scrolled up or down one line when you
2192 attempt to move across a screen boundary.  If \fIunset\fP, the screen
2193 is cleared and the next or previous page of the menu is displayed
2194 (useful for slow links to avoid many redraws).
2195
2196
2197 .TP
2198 .B meta_key
2199 .nf
2200 Type: boolean
2201 Default: no
2202 .fi
2203 .IP
2204 If set, forces Mutt to interpret keystrokes with the high bit (bit 8)
2205 set as if the user had pressed the ESC key and whatever key remains
2206 after having the high bit removed.  For example, if the key pressed
2207 has an ASCII value of 0xf4, then this is treated as if the user had
2208 pressed ESC then \(lqx\(rq.  This is because the result of removing the
2209 high bit from \(lq0xf4\(rq is \(lq0x74\(rq, which is the ASCII character
2210 \(lqx\(rq.
2211
2212
2213 .TP
2214 .B mh_purge
2215 .nf
2216 Type: boolean
2217 Default: no
2218 .fi
2219 .IP
2220 When unset, mutt will mimic mh's behaviour and rename deleted messages
2221 to \fI,<old file name>\fP in mh folders instead of really deleting
2222 them.  If the variable is set, the message files will simply be
2223 deleted.
2224
2225
2226 .TP
2227 .B mh_seq_flagged
2228 .nf
2229 Type: string
2230 Default: \(lqflagged\(rq
2231 .fi
2232 .IP
2233 The name of the MH sequence used for flagged messages.
2234
2235
2236 .TP
2237 .B mh_seq_replied
2238 .nf
2239 Type: string
2240 Default: \(lqreplied\(rq
2241 .fi
2242 .IP
2243 The name of the MH sequence used to tag replied messages.
2244
2245
2246 .TP
2247 .B mh_seq_unseen
2248 .nf
2249 Type: string
2250 Default: \(lqunseen\(rq
2251 .fi
2252 .IP
2253 The name of the MH sequence used for unseen messages.
2254
2255
2256 .TP
2257 .B mime_forward
2258 .nf
2259 Type: quadoption
2260 Default: no
2261 .fi
2262 .IP
2263 When set, the message you are forwarding will be attached as a
2264 separate MIME part instead of included in the main body of the
2265 message.  This is useful for forwarding MIME messages so the receiver
2266 can properly view the message as it was delivered to you. If you like
2267 to switch between MIME and not MIME from mail to mail, set this
2268 variable to ask-no or ask-yes.
2269 .IP
2270 Also see \(lq$forward_decode\(rq and \(lq$mime_forward_decode\(rq.
2271
2272
2273 .TP
2274 .B mime_forward_decode
2275 .nf
2276 Type: boolean
2277 Default: no
2278 .fi
2279 .IP
2280 Controls the decoding of complex MIME messages into text/plain when
2281 forwarding a message while \(lq$mime_forward\(rq is \fIset\fP. Otherwise
2282 \(lq$forward_decode\(rq is used instead.
2283
2284
2285 .TP
2286 .B mime_forward_rest
2287 .nf
2288 Type: quadoption
2289 Default: yes
2290 .fi
2291 .IP
2292 When forwarding multiple attachments of a MIME message from the recvattach
2293 menu, attachments which cannot be decoded in a reasonable manner will
2294 be attached to the newly composed message if this option is set.
2295
2296
2297 .TP
2298 .B mime_subject
2299 .nf
2300 Type: boolean
2301 Default: yes
2302 .fi
2303 .IP
2304 If \fIunset\fP, 8-bit \(lqsubject:\(rq line in article header will not be
2305 encoded according to RFC2047 to base64.  This is useful when message
2306 is Usenet article, because MIME for news is nonstandard feature.
2307
2308
2309 .TP
2310 .B mix_entry_format
2311 .nf
2312 Type: string
2313 Default: \(lq%4n %c %-16s %a\(rq
2314 .fi
2315 .IP
2316 This variable describes the format of a remailer line on the mixmaster
2317 chain selection screen.  The following printf-like sequences are 
2318 supported:
2319 .IP
2320
2321 .RS
2322 .IP %n 
2323 The running number on the menu.
2324
2325 .IP %c 
2326 Remailer capabilities.
2327
2328 .IP %s 
2329 The remailer's short name.
2330
2331 .IP %a 
2332 The remailer's e-mail address.
2333
2334 .RE
2335
2336 .TP
2337 .B mixmaster
2338 .nf
2339 Type: path
2340 Default: \(lqmixmaster\(rq
2341 .fi
2342 .IP
2343 This variable contains the path to the Mixmaster binary on your
2344 system.  It is used with various sets of parameters to gather the
2345 list of known remailers, and to finally send a message through the
2346 mixmaster chain.
2347
2348
2349 .TP
2350 .B move
2351 .nf
2352 Type: quadoption
2353 Default: ask-no
2354 .fi
2355 .IP
2356 Controls whether you will be asked to confirm moving read messages
2357 from your spool mailbox to your \(lq$mbox\(rq mailbox, or as a result of
2358 a \(lqmbox-hook\(rq command.
2359
2360
2361 .TP
2362 .B message_format
2363 .nf
2364 Type: string
2365 Default: \(lq%s\(rq
2366 .fi
2367 .IP
2368 This is the string displayed in the \(lqattachment\(rq menu for
2369 attachments of type message/rfc822.  For a full listing of defined
2370 printf()-like sequences see the section on \(lq$index_format\(rq.
2371
2372
2373 .TP
2374 .B narrow_tree
2375 .nf
2376 Type: boolean
2377 Default: no
2378 .fi
2379 .IP
2380 This variable, when set, makes the thread tree narrower, allowing
2381 deeper threads to fit on the screen.
2382
2383
2384 .TP
2385 .B news_cache_dir
2386 .nf
2387 Type: path
2388 Default: \(lq~/.mutt\(rq
2389 .fi
2390 .IP
2391 This variable pointing to directory where Mutt will save cached news
2392 articles headers in. If \fIunset\fP, headers will not be saved at all
2393 and will be reloaded each time when you enter to newsgroup.
2394
2395
2396 .TP
2397 .B news_server
2398 .nf
2399 Type: string
2400 Default: \(lq\(rq
2401 .fi
2402 .IP
2403 This variable specifies domain name or address of NNTP server. It
2404 defaults to the newsserver specified in the environment variable
2405 $NNTPSERVER or contained in the file /etc/nntpserver.  You can also
2406 specify username and an alternative port for each newsserver, ie:
2407 .IP
2408 [nntp[s]://][username[:password]@]newsserver[:port]
2409
2410
2411 .TP
2412 .B newsrc
2413 .nf
2414 Type: path
2415 Default: \(lq~/.newsrc\(rq
2416 .fi
2417 .IP
2418 The file, containing info about subscribed newsgroups - names and
2419 indexes of read articles.  The following printf-style sequence
2420 is understood:
2421 .IP
2422
2423 .IP
2424 .DS
2425 .sp
2426 .ft CR
2427 .nf
2428 %s      newsserver name
2429
2430 .fi
2431 .ec
2432 .ft P
2433 .sp
2434
2435
2436 .TP
2437 .B nntp_context
2438 .nf
2439 Type: number
2440 Default: 1000
2441 .fi
2442 .IP
2443 This variable defines number of articles which will be in index when
2444 newsgroup entered.  If active newsgroup have more articles than this
2445 number, oldest articles will be ignored.  Also controls how many
2446 articles headers will be saved in cache when you quit newsgroup.
2447
2448
2449 .TP
2450 .B nntp_load_description
2451 .nf
2452 Type: boolean
2453 Default: yes
2454 .fi
2455 .IP
2456 This variable controls whether or not descriptions for each newsgroup
2457 must be loaded when newsgroup is added to list (first time list
2458 loading or new newsgroup adding).
2459
2460
2461 .TP
2462 .B nntp_user
2463 .nf
2464 Type: string
2465 Default: \(lq\(rq
2466 .fi
2467 .IP
2468 Your login name on the NNTP server.  If \fIunset\fP and NNTP server requires
2469 authentification, Mutt will prompt you for your account name when you
2470 connect to newsserver.
2471
2472
2473 .TP
2474 .B nntp_pass
2475 .nf
2476 Type: string
2477 Default: \(lq\(rq
2478 .fi
2479 .IP
2480 Your password for NNTP account.
2481
2482
2483 .TP
2484 .B nntp_poll
2485 .nf
2486 Type: number
2487 Default: 60
2488 .fi
2489 .IP
2490 The time in seconds until any operations on newsgroup except post new
2491 article will cause recheck for new news.  If set to 0, Mutt will
2492 recheck newsgroup on each operation in index (stepping, read article,
2493 etc.).
2494
2495
2496 .TP
2497 .B nntp_reconnect
2498 .nf
2499 Type: quadoption
2500 Default: ask-yes
2501 .fi
2502 .IP
2503 Controls whether or not Mutt will try to reconnect to newsserver when
2504 connection lost.
2505
2506
2507 .TP
2508 .B pager
2509 .nf
2510 Type: path
2511 Default: \(lqbuiltin\(rq
2512 .fi
2513 .IP
2514 This variable specifies which pager you would like to use to view
2515 messages.  builtin means to use the builtin pager, otherwise this
2516 variable should specify the pathname of the external pager you would
2517 like to use.
2518 .IP
2519 Using an external pager may have some disadvantages: Additional
2520 keystrokes are necessary because you can't call mutt functions
2521 directly from the pager, and screen resizes cause lines longer than
2522 the screen width to be badly formatted in the help menu.
2523
2524
2525 .TP
2526 .B pager_context
2527 .nf
2528 Type: number
2529 Default: 0
2530 .fi
2531 .IP
2532 This variable controls the number of lines of context that are given
2533 when displaying the next or previous page in the internal pager.  By
2534 default, Mutt will display the line after the last one on the screen
2535 at the top of the next page (0 lines of context).
2536
2537
2538 .TP
2539 .B pager_format
2540 .nf
2541 Type: string
2542 Default: \(lq-%Z- %C/%m: %-20.20n   %s\(rq
2543 .fi
2544 .IP
2545 This variable controls the format of the one-line message \(lqstatus\(rq
2546 displayed before each message in either the internal or an external
2547 pager.  The valid sequences are listed in the \(lq$index_format\(rq
2548 section.
2549
2550
2551 .TP
2552 .B pager_index_lines
2553 .nf
2554 Type: number
2555 Default: 0
2556 .fi
2557 .IP
2558 Determines the number of lines of a mini-index which is shown when in
2559 the pager.  The current message, unless near the top or bottom of the
2560 folder, will be roughly one third of the way down this mini-index,
2561 giving the reader the context of a few messages before and after the
2562 message.  This is useful, for example, to determine how many messages
2563 remain to be read in the current thread.  One of the lines is reserved
2564 for the status bar from the index, so a \fIpager_index_lines\fP of 6
2565 will only show 5 lines of the actual index.  A value of 0 results in
2566 no index being shown.  If the number of messages in the current folder
2567 is less than \fIpager_index_lines\fP, then the index will only use as
2568 many lines as it needs.
2569
2570
2571 .TP
2572 .B pager_stop
2573 .nf
2574 Type: boolean
2575 Default: no
2576 .fi
2577 .IP
2578 When set, the internal-pager will \fBnot\fP move to the next message
2579 when you are at the end of a message and invoke the \fInext-page\fP
2580 function.
2581
2582
2583 .TP
2584 .B crypt_autosign
2585 .nf
2586 Type: boolean
2587 Default: no
2588 .fi
2589 .IP
2590 Setting this variable will cause Mutt to always attempt to
2591 cryptographically sign outgoing messages.  This can be overridden
2592 by use of the \fIpgp-menu\fP, when signing is not required or
2593 encryption is requested as well. If \(lq$smime_is_default\(rq is set,
2594 then OpenSSL is used instead to create S/MIME messages and settings can
2595 be overridden by use of the \fIsmime-menu\fP.
2596 (Crypto only)
2597
2598
2599 .TP
2600 .B crypt_autoencrypt
2601 .nf
2602 Type: boolean
2603 Default: no
2604 .fi
2605 .IP
2606 Setting this variable will cause Mutt to always attempt to PGP
2607 encrypt outgoing messages.  This is probably only useful in
2608 connection to the \fIsend-hook\fP command.  It can be overridden
2609 by use of the \fIpgp-menu\fP, when encryption is not required or
2610 signing is requested as well.  IF \(lq$smime_is_default\(rq is set,
2611 then OpenSSL is used instead to create S/MIME messages and
2612 settings can be overridden by use of the \fIsmime-menu\fP.
2613 (Crypto only)
2614
2615
2616 .TP
2617 .B pgp_ignore_subkeys
2618 .nf
2619 Type: boolean
2620 Default: yes
2621 .fi
2622 .IP
2623 Setting this variable will cause Mutt to ignore OpenPGP subkeys. Instead,
2624 the principal key will inherit the subkeys' capabilities.  Unset this
2625 if you want to play interesting key selection games.
2626 (PGP only)
2627
2628
2629 .TP
2630 .B crypt_replyencrypt
2631 .nf
2632 Type: boolean
2633 Default: yes
2634 .fi
2635 .IP
2636 If set, automatically PGP or OpenSSL encrypt replies to messages which are
2637 encrypted.
2638 (Crypto only)
2639
2640
2641 .TP
2642 .B crypt_replysign
2643 .nf
2644 Type: boolean
2645 Default: no
2646 .fi
2647 .IP
2648 If set, automatically PGP or OpenSSL sign replies to messages which are
2649 signed.
2650 .IP
2651 \fBNote:\fP this does not work on messages that are encrypted
2652 \fBand\fP signed!
2653 (Crypto only)
2654
2655
2656 .TP
2657 .B crypt_replysignencrypted
2658 .nf
2659 Type: boolean
2660 Default: no
2661 .fi
2662 .IP
2663 If set, automatically PGP or OpenSSL sign replies to messages
2664 which are encrypted. This makes sense in combination with
2665 \(lq$crypt_replyencrypt\(rq, because it allows you to sign all
2666 messages which are automatically encrypted.  This works around
2667 the problem noted in \(lq$crypt_replysign\(rq, that mutt is not able
2668 to find out whether an encrypted message is also signed.
2669 (Crypto only)
2670
2671
2672 .TP
2673 .B crypt_timestamp
2674 .nf
2675 Type: boolean
2676 Default: yes
2677 .fi
2678 .IP
2679 If set, mutt will include a time stamp in the lines surrounding
2680 PGP or S/MIME output, so spoofing such lines is more difficult.
2681 If you are using colors to mark these lines, and rely on these,
2682 you may unset this setting.
2683 (Crypto only)
2684
2685
2686 .TP
2687 .B pgp_use_gpg_agent
2688 .nf
2689 Type: boolean
2690 Default: no
2691 .fi
2692 .IP
2693 If set, mutt will use a possibly-running gpg-agent process.
2694 (PGP only)
2695
2696
2697 .TP
2698 .B crypt_verify_sig
2699 .nf
2700 Type: quadoption
2701 Default: yes
2702 .fi
2703 .IP
2704 If \(lqyes\(rq, always attempt to verify PGP or S/MIME signatures.
2705 If \(lqask\(rq, ask whether or not to verify the signature. 
2706 If \(lqno\(rq, never attempt to verify cryptographic signatures.
2707 (Crypto only)
2708
2709
2710 .TP
2711 .B smime_is_default
2712 .nf
2713 Type: boolean
2714 Default: no
2715 .fi
2716 .IP
2717 The default behaviour of mutt is to use PGP on all auto-sign/encryption
2718 operations. To override and to use OpenSSL instead this must be set.
2719 However, this has no effect while replying, since mutt will automatically 
2720 select the same application that was used to sign/encrypt the original
2721 message.  (Note that this variable can be overridden by unsetting $crypt_autosmime.)
2722 (S/MIME only)
2723
2724
2725 .TP
2726 .B smime_ask_cert_label
2727 .nf
2728 Type: boolean
2729 Default: yes
2730 .fi
2731 .IP
2732 This flag controls whether you want to be asked to enter a label
2733 for a certificate about to be added to the database or not. It is
2734 set by default.
2735 (S/MIME only)
2736
2737
2738 .TP
2739 .B smime_decrypt_use_default_key
2740 .nf
2741 Type: boolean
2742 Default: yes
2743 .fi
2744 .IP
2745 If set (default) this tells mutt to use the default key for decryption. Otherwise,
2746 if manage multiple certificate-key-pairs, mutt will try to use the mailbox-address
2747 to determine the key to use. It will ask you to supply a key, if it can't find one.
2748 (S/MIME only)
2749
2750
2751 .TP
2752 .B pgp_entry_format
2753 .nf
2754 Type: string
2755 Default: \(lq%4n %t%f %4l/0x%k %-4a %2c %u\(rq
2756 .fi
2757 .IP
2758 This variable allows you to customize the PGP key selection menu to
2759 your personal taste. This string is similar to \(lq$index_format\(rq, but
2760 has its own set of printf()-like sequences:
2761 .IP
2762
2763 .RS
2764 .IP %n     
2765 number
2766
2767 .IP %k     
2768 key id
2769
2770 .IP %u     
2771 user id
2772
2773 .IP %a     
2774 algorithm
2775
2776 .IP %l     
2777 key length
2778
2779 .IP %f     
2780 flags
2781
2782 .IP %c     
2783 capabilities
2784
2785 .IP %t     
2786 trust/validity of the key-uid association
2787
2788 .IP %[<s>] 
2789 date of the key where <s> is an strftime(3) expression
2790
2791 .RE
2792 .IP
2793 (PGP only)
2794
2795
2796 .TP
2797 .B pgp_good_sign
2798 .nf
2799 Type: regular expression
2800 Default: \(lq\(rq
2801 .fi
2802 .IP
2803 If you assign a text to this variable, then a PGP signature is only
2804 considered verified if the output from $pgp_verify_command contains
2805 the text. Use this variable if the exit code from the command is 0
2806 even for bad signatures.
2807 (PGP only)
2808
2809
2810 .TP
2811 .B pgp_check_exit
2812 .nf
2813 Type: boolean
2814 Default: yes
2815 .fi
2816 .IP
2817 If set, mutt will check the exit code of the PGP subprocess when
2818 signing or encrypting.  A non-zero exit code means that the
2819 subprocess failed.
2820 (PGP only)
2821
2822
2823 .TP
2824 .B pgp_long_ids
2825 .nf
2826 Type: boolean
2827 Default: no
2828 .fi
2829 .IP
2830 If set, use 64 bit PGP key IDs. Unset uses the normal 32 bit Key IDs.
2831 (PGP only)
2832
2833
2834 .TP
2835 .B pgp_retainable_sigs
2836 .nf
2837 Type: boolean
2838 Default: no
2839 .fi
2840 .IP
2841 If set, signed and encrypted messages will consist of nested
2842 multipart/signed and multipart/encrypted body parts.
2843 .IP
2844 This is useful for applications like encrypted and signed mailing
2845 lists, where the outer layer (multipart/encrypted) can be easily
2846 removed, while the inner multipart/signed part is retained.
2847 (PGP only)
2848
2849
2850 .TP
2851 .B pgp_show_unusable
2852 .nf
2853 Type: boolean
2854 Default: yes
2855 .fi
2856 .IP
2857 If set, mutt will display non-usable keys on the PGP key selection
2858 menu.  This includes keys which have been revoked, have expired, or
2859 have been marked as \(lqdisabled\(rq by the user.
2860 (PGP only)
2861
2862
2863 .TP
2864 .B pgp_sign_as
2865 .nf
2866 Type: string
2867 Default: \(lq\(rq
2868 .fi
2869 .IP
2870 If you have more than one key pair, this option allows you to specify
2871 which of your private keys to use.  It is recommended that you use the
2872 keyid form to specify your key (e.g., \(lq0x00112233\(rq).
2873 (PGP only)
2874
2875
2876 .TP
2877 .B pgp_strict_enc
2878 .nf
2879 Type: boolean
2880 Default: yes
2881 .fi
2882 .IP
2883 If set, Mutt will automatically encode PGP/MIME signed messages as
2884 \fIquoted-printable\fP.  Please note that unsetting this variable may
2885 lead to problems with non-verifyable PGP signatures, so only change
2886 this if you know what you are doing.
2887 (PGP only)
2888
2889
2890 .TP
2891 .B pgp_timeout
2892 .nf
2893 Type: number
2894 Default: 300
2895 .fi
2896 .IP
2897 The number of seconds after which a cached passphrase will expire if
2898 not used.
2899 (PGP only)
2900
2901
2902 .TP
2903 .B pgp_sort_keys
2904 .nf
2905 Type: sort order
2906 Default: address
2907 .fi
2908 .IP
2909 Specifies how the entries in the `pgp keys' menu are sorted. The
2910 following are legal values:
2911 .IP
2912
2913 .RS
2914 .IP address 
2915 sort alphabetically by user id
2916
2917 .IP keyid   
2918 sort alphabetically by key id
2919
2920 .IP date    
2921 sort by key creation date
2922
2923 .IP trust   
2924 sort by the trust of the key
2925
2926 .RE
2927 .IP
2928 If you prefer reverse order of the above values, prefix it with
2929 `reverse-'.
2930 (PGP only)
2931
2932
2933 .TP
2934 .B pgp_create_traditional
2935 .nf
2936 Type: quadoption
2937 Default: no
2938 .fi
2939 .IP
2940 This option controls whether Mutt generates old-style inline PGP
2941 encrypted or signed messages.
2942 .IP
2943 Note that PGP/MIME will be used automatically for messages which have
2944 a character set different from us-ascii, or which consist of more than
2945 a single MIME part.
2946 .IP
2947 Also note that using the old-style PGP message format is \fBstrongly\fP
2948 \fBdeprecated\fP.
2949 (PGP only)
2950
2951
2952 .TP
2953 .B pgp_auto_traditional
2954 .nf
2955 Type: boolean
2956 Default: no
2957 .fi
2958 .IP
2959 This option causes Mutt to generate an old-style inline PGP
2960 encrypted or signed message when replying to an old-style
2961 message, and a PGP/MIME message when replying to a PGP/MIME
2962 message.  Note that this option is only meaningful when using
2963 \(lq$crypt_replyencrypt\(rq, \(lq$crypt_replysign\(rq, or
2964 \(lq$crypt_replysignencrypted\(rq.
2965 .IP
2966 Also note that PGP/MIME will be used automatically for messages
2967 which have a character set different from us-ascii, or which
2968 consist of more than a single MIME part.
2969 .IP
2970 This option overrides \(lq$pgp_create_traditional\(rq
2971 (PGP only)
2972
2973
2974 .TP
2975 .B pgp_decode_command
2976 .nf
2977 Type: string
2978 Default: \(lq\(rq
2979 .fi
2980 .IP
2981 This format strings specifies a command which is used to decode 
2982 application/pgp attachments.
2983 .IP
2984 The PGP command formats have their own set of printf-like sequences:
2985 .IP
2986
2987 .RS
2988 .IP %p 
2989 Expands to PGPPASSFD=0 when a pass phrase is needed, to an empty
2990 string otherwise. Note: This may be used with a %? construct.
2991
2992 .IP %f 
2993 Expands to the name of a file containing a message.
2994
2995 .IP %s 
2996 Expands to the name of a file containing the signature part
2997            of a multipart/signed attachment when verifying it.
2998
2999 .IP %a 
3000 The value of $pgp_sign_as.
3001
3002 .IP %r 
3003 One or more key IDs.
3004
3005 .RE
3006 .IP
3007 For examples on how to configure these formats for the various versions
3008 of PGP which are floating around, see the pgp*.rc and gpg.rc files in
3009 the samples/ subdirectory which has been installed on your system
3010 alongside the documentation.
3011 (PGP only)
3012
3013
3014 .TP
3015 .B pgp_getkeys_command
3016 .nf
3017 Type: string
3018 Default: \(lq\(rq
3019 .fi
3020 .IP
3021 This command is invoked whenever mutt will need public key information.
3022 %r is the only printf-like sequence used with this format.
3023 (PGP only)
3024
3025
3026 .TP
3027 .B pgp_verify_command
3028 .nf
3029 Type: string
3030 Default: \(lq\(rq
3031 .fi
3032 .IP
3033 This command is used to verify PGP signatures.
3034 (PGP only)
3035
3036
3037 .TP
3038 .B pgp_decrypt_command
3039 .nf
3040 Type: string
3041 Default: \(lq\(rq
3042 .fi
3043 .IP
3044 This command is used to decrypt a PGP encrypted message.
3045 (PGP only)
3046
3047
3048 .TP
3049 .B pgp_clearsign_command
3050 .nf
3051 Type: string
3052 Default: \(lq\(rq
3053 .fi
3054 .IP
3055 This format is used to create a old-style \(rqclearsigned\(rq PGP
3056 message.  Note that the use of this format is \fBstrongly\fP
3057 \fBdeprecated\fP.
3058 (PGP only)
3059
3060
3061 .TP
3062 .B pgp_sign_command
3063 .nf
3064 Type: string
3065 Default: \(lq\(rq
3066 .fi
3067 .IP
3068 This command is used to create the detached PGP signature for a 
3069 multipart/signed PGP/MIME body part.
3070 (PGP only)
3071
3072
3073 .TP
3074 .B pgp_encrypt_sign_command
3075 .nf
3076 Type: string
3077 Default: \(lq\(rq
3078 .fi
3079 .IP
3080 This command is used to both sign and encrypt a body part.
3081 (PGP only)
3082
3083
3084 .TP
3085 .B pgp_encrypt_only_command
3086 .nf
3087 Type: string
3088 Default: \(lq\(rq
3089 .fi
3090 .IP
3091 This command is used to encrypt a body part without signing it.
3092 (PGP only)
3093
3094
3095 .TP
3096 .B pgp_import_command
3097 .nf
3098 Type: string
3099 Default: \(lq\(rq
3100 .fi
3101 .IP
3102 This command is used to import a key from a message into 
3103 the user's public key ring.
3104 (PGP only)
3105
3106
3107 .TP
3108 .B pgp_export_command
3109 .nf
3110 Type: string
3111 Default: \(lq\(rq
3112 .fi
3113 .IP
3114 This command is used to export a public key from the user's
3115 key ring.
3116 (PGP only)
3117
3118
3119 .TP
3120 .B pgp_verify_key_command
3121 .nf
3122 Type: string
3123 Default: \(lq\(rq
3124 .fi
3125 .IP
3126 This command is used to verify key information from the key selection
3127 menu.
3128 (PGP only)
3129
3130
3131 .TP
3132 .B pgp_list_secring_command
3133 .nf
3134 Type: string
3135 Default: \(lq\(rq
3136 .fi
3137 .IP
3138 This command is used to list the secret key ring's contents.  The
3139 output format must be analogous to the one used by 
3140 gpg --list-keys --with-colons.
3141 .IP
3142 This format is also generated by the pgpring utility which comes 
3143 with mutt.
3144 (PGP only)
3145
3146
3147 .TP
3148 .B pgp_list_pubring_command
3149 .nf
3150 Type: string
3151 Default: \(lq\(rq
3152 .fi
3153 .IP
3154 This command is used to list the public key ring's contents.  The
3155 output format must be analogous to the one used by 
3156 gpg --list-keys --with-colons.
3157 .IP
3158 This format is also generated by the pgpring utility which comes 
3159 with mutt.
3160 (PGP only)
3161
3162
3163 .TP
3164 .B forward_decrypt
3165 .nf
3166 Type: boolean
3167 Default: yes
3168 .fi
3169 .IP
3170 Controls the handling of encrypted messages when forwarding a message.
3171 When set, the outer layer of encryption is stripped off.  This
3172 variable is only used if \(lq$mime_forward\(rq is \fIset\fP and
3173 \(lq$mime_forward_decode\(rq is \fIunset\fP.
3174 (PGP only)
3175
3176
3177 .TP
3178 .B smime_timeout
3179 .nf
3180 Type: number
3181 Default: 300
3182 .fi
3183 .IP
3184 The number of seconds after which a cached passphrase will expire if
3185 not used.
3186 (S/MIME only)
3187
3188
3189 .TP
3190 .B smime_encrypt_with
3191 .nf
3192 Type: string
3193 Default: \(lq\(rq
3194 .fi
3195 .IP
3196 This sets the algorithm that should be used for encryption.
3197 Valid choices are \(rqdes\(rq, \(rqdes3\(rq, \(rqrc2-40\(rq, \(rqrc2-64\(rq, \(rqrc2-128\(rq.
3198 If unset \(rq3des\(rq (TripleDES) is used.
3199 (S/MIME only)
3200
3201
3202 .TP
3203 .B smime_keys
3204 .nf
3205 Type: path
3206 Default: \(lq\(rq
3207 .fi
3208 .IP
3209 Since there is no pubring/secring as with PGP, mutt has to handle
3210 storage ad retrieval of keys/certs by itself. This is very basic right now,
3211 and stores keys and certificates in two different directories, both
3212 named as the hash-value retrieved from OpenSSL. There is an index file
3213 which contains mailbox-address keyid pair, and which can be manually
3214 edited. This one points to the location of the private keys.
3215 (S/MIME only)
3216
3217
3218 .TP
3219 .B smime_ca_location
3220 .nf
3221 Type: path
3222 Default: \(lq\(rq
3223 .fi
3224 .IP
3225 This variable contains the name of either a directory, or a file which
3226 contains trusted certificates for use with OpenSSL.
3227 (S/MIME only)
3228
3229
3230 .TP
3231 .B smime_certificates
3232 .nf
3233 Type: path
3234 Default: \(lq\(rq
3235 .fi
3236 .IP
3237 Since there is no pubring/secring as with PGP, mutt has to handle
3238 storage and retrieval of keys by itself. This is very basic right
3239 now, and keys and certificates are stored in two different
3240 directories, both named as the hash-value retrieved from
3241 OpenSSL. There is an index file which contains mailbox-address
3242 keyid pairs, and which can be manually edited. This one points to
3243 the location of the certificates.
3244 (S/MIME only)
3245
3246
3247 .TP
3248 .B smime_decrypt_command
3249 .nf
3250 Type: string
3251 Default: \(lq\(rq
3252 .fi
3253 .IP
3254 This format string specifies a command which is used to decrypt
3255 application/x-pkcs7-mime attachments.
3256 .IP
3257 The OpenSSL command formats have their own set of printf-like sequences
3258 similar to PGP's:
3259 .IP
3260
3261 .RS
3262 .IP %f 
3263 Expands to the name of a file containing a message.
3264
3265 .IP %s 
3266 Expands to the name of a file containing the signature part
3267            of a multipart/signed attachment when verifying it.
3268
3269 .IP %k 
3270 The key-pair specified with $smime_default_key
3271
3272 .IP %c 
3273 One or more certificate IDs.
3274
3275 .IP %a 
3276 The algorithm used for encryption.
3277
3278 .IP %C 
3279 CA location:  Depending on whether $smime_ca_location
3280            points to a directory or file, this expands to 
3281            \(rq-CApath $smime_ca_location\(rq or \(rq-CAfile $smime_ca_location\(rq.
3282
3283 .RE
3284 .IP
3285 For examples on how to configure these formats, see the smime.rc in
3286 the samples/ subdirectory which has been installed on your system
3287 alongside the documentation.
3288 (S/MIME only)
3289
3290
3291 .TP
3292 .B smime_verify_command
3293 .nf
3294 Type: string
3295 Default: \(lq\(rq
3296 .fi
3297 .IP
3298 This command is used to verify S/MIME signatures of type multipart/signed.
3299 (S/MIME only)
3300
3301
3302 .TP
3303 .B smime_verify_opaque_command
3304 .nf
3305 Type: string
3306 Default: \(lq\(rq
3307 .fi
3308 .IP
3309 This command is used to verify S/MIME signatures of type
3310 application/x-pkcs7-mime.
3311 (S/MIME only)
3312
3313
3314 .TP
3315 .B smime_sign_command
3316 .nf
3317 Type: string
3318 Default: \(lq\(rq
3319 .fi
3320 .IP
3321 This command is used to created S/MIME signatures of type
3322 multipart/signed, which can be read by all mail clients.
3323 (S/MIME only)
3324
3325
3326 .TP
3327 .B smime_sign_opaque_command
3328 .nf
3329 Type: string
3330 Default: \(lq\(rq
3331 .fi
3332 .IP
3333 This command is used to created S/MIME signatures of type
3334 application/x-pkcs7-signature, which can only be handled by mail
3335 clients supporting the S/MIME extension.
3336 (S/MIME only)
3337
3338
3339 .TP
3340 .B smime_encrypt_command
3341 .nf
3342 Type: string
3343 Default: \(lq\(rq
3344 .fi
3345 .IP
3346 This command is used to create encrypted S/MIME messages.
3347 (S/MIME only)
3348
3349
3350 .TP
3351 .B smime_pk7out_command
3352 .nf
3353 Type: string
3354 Default: \(lq\(rq
3355 .fi
3356 .IP
3357 This command is used to extract PKCS7 structures of S/MIME signatures,
3358 in order to extract the public X509 certificate(s).
3359 (S/MIME only)
3360
3361
3362 .TP
3363 .B smime_get_cert_command
3364 .nf
3365 Type: string
3366 Default: \(lq\(rq
3367 .fi
3368 .IP
3369 This command is used to extract X509 certificates from a PKCS7 structure.
3370 (S/MIME only)
3371
3372
3373 .TP
3374 .B smime_get_signer_cert_command
3375 .nf
3376 Type: string
3377 Default: \(lq\(rq
3378 .fi
3379 .IP
3380 This command is used to extract only the signers X509 certificate from a S/MIME
3381 signature, so that the certificate's owner may get compared to the email's 
3382 'From'-field.
3383 (S/MIME only)
3384
3385
3386 .TP
3387 .B smime_import_cert_command
3388 .nf
3389 Type: string
3390 Default: \(lq\(rq
3391 .fi
3392 .IP
3393 This command is used to import a certificate via smime_keys.
3394 (S/MIME only)
3395
3396
3397 .TP
3398 .B smime_get_cert_email_command
3399 .nf
3400 Type: string
3401 Default: \(lq\(rq
3402 .fi
3403 .IP
3404 This command is used to extract the mail address(es) used for storing
3405 X509 certificates, and for verification purposes (to check whether the
3406 certificate was issued for the sender's mailbox).
3407 (S/MIME only)
3408
3409
3410 .TP
3411 .B smime_default_key
3412 .nf
3413 Type: string
3414 Default: \(lq\(rq
3415 .fi
3416 .IP
3417 This is the default key-pair to use for signing. This must be set to the
3418 keyid (the hash-value that OpenSSL generates) to work properly
3419 (S/MIME only)
3420
3421
3422 .TP
3423 .B smtp_auth_username
3424 .nf
3425 Type: string
3426 Default: \(lq\(rq
3427 .fi
3428 .IP
3429 Defines the username to use with SMTP AUTH.  Setting this variable will
3430 cause mutt to attempt to use SMTP AUTH when sending.
3431
3432
3433 .TP
3434 .B smtp_auth_password
3435 .nf
3436 Type: string
3437 Default: \(lq\(rq
3438 .fi
3439 .IP
3440 Defines the password to use with SMTP AUTH.  If \(lq$smtp_auth_username\(rq
3441 is set, but this variable is not, you will be prompted for a password
3442 when sending.
3443
3444
3445 .TP
3446 .B smtp_host
3447 .nf
3448 Type: string
3449 Default: \(lq\(rq
3450 .fi
3451 .IP
3452 Defines the SMTP host which will be used to deliver mail, as opposed
3453 to invoking the sendmail binary.  Setting this variable overrides the
3454 value of \(lq$sendmail\(rq, and any associated variables.
3455
3456
3457 .TP
3458 .B smtp_port
3459 .nf
3460 Type: number
3461 Default: 25
3462 .fi
3463 .IP
3464 Defines the port that the SMTP host is listening on for mail delivery.
3465 Must be specified as a number.
3466 .IP
3467 Defaults to 25, the standard SMTP port, but RFC 2476-compliant SMTP
3468 servers will probably desire 587, the mail submission port.
3469
3470
3471 .TP
3472 .B ssl_starttls
3473 .nf
3474 Type: quadoption
3475 Default: yes
3476 .fi
3477 .IP
3478 If set (the default), mutt will attempt to use STARTTLS on servers
3479 advertising the capability. When unset, mutt will not attempt to
3480 use STARTTLS regardless of the server's capabilities.
3481
3482
3483 .TP
3484 .B certificate_file
3485 .nf
3486 Type: path
3487 Default: \(lq\(rq
3488 .fi
3489 .IP
3490 This variable specifies the file where the certificates you trust
3491 are saved. When an unknown certificate is encountered, you are asked
3492 if you accept it or not. If you accept it, the certificate can also 
3493 be saved in this file and further connections are automatically 
3494 accepted.
3495 .IP
3496 You can also manually add CA certificates in this file. Any server
3497 certificate that is signed with one of these CA certificates are 
3498 also automatically accepted.
3499 .IP
3500 Example: set certificate_file=~/.mutt/certificates
3501
3502
3503 .TP
3504 .B ssl_usesystemcerts
3505 .nf
3506 Type: boolean
3507 Default: yes
3508 .fi
3509 .IP
3510 If set to \fIyes\fP, mutt will use CA certificates in the
3511 system-wide certificate store when checking if server certificate 
3512 is signed by a trusted CA.
3513
3514
3515 .TP
3516 .B entropy_file
3517 .nf
3518 Type: path
3519 Default: \(lq\(rq
3520 .fi
3521 .IP
3522 The file which includes random data that is used to initialize SSL
3523 library functions.
3524
3525
3526 .TP
3527 .B ssl_use_sslv2
3528 .nf
3529 Type: boolean
3530 Default: yes
3531 .fi
3532 .IP
3533 This variables specifies whether to attempt to use SSLv2 in the
3534 SSL authentication process.
3535
3536
3537 .TP
3538 .B ssl_use_sslv3
3539 .nf
3540 Type: boolean
3541 Default: yes
3542 .fi
3543 .IP
3544 This variables specifies whether to attempt to use SSLv3 in the
3545 SSL authentication process.
3546
3547
3548 .TP
3549 .B ssl_use_tlsv1
3550 .nf
3551 Type: boolean
3552 Default: yes
3553 .fi
3554 .IP
3555 This variables specifies whether to attempt to use TLSv1 in the
3556 SSL authentication process.
3557
3558
3559 .TP
3560 .B pipe_split
3561 .nf
3562 Type: boolean
3563 Default: no
3564 .fi
3565 .IP
3566 Used in connection with the \fIpipe-message\fP command and the \(lqtag-
3567 prefix\(rq operator.  If this variable is unset, when piping a list of
3568 tagged messages Mutt will concatenate the messages and will pipe them
3569 as a single folder.  When set, Mutt will pipe the messages one by one.
3570 In both cases the messages are piped in the current sorted order,
3571 and the \(lq$pipe_sep\(rq separator is added after each message.
3572
3573
3574 .TP
3575 .B pipe_decode
3576 .nf
3577 Type: boolean
3578 Default: no
3579 .fi
3580 .IP
3581 Used in connection with the \fIpipe-message\fP command.  When unset,
3582 Mutt will pipe the messages without any preprocessing. When set, Mutt
3583 will weed headers and will attempt to PGP/MIME decode the messages
3584 first.
3585
3586
3587 .TP
3588 .B pipe_sep
3589 .nf
3590 Type: string
3591 Default: \(lq\\n\(rq
3592 .fi
3593 .IP
3594 The separator to add between messages when piping a list of tagged
3595 messages to an external Unix command.
3596
3597
3598 .TP
3599 .B pop_authenticators
3600 .nf
3601 Type: string
3602 Default: \(lq\(rq
3603 .fi
3604 .IP
3605 This is a colon-delimited list of authentication methods mutt may
3606 attempt to use to log in to an POP server, in the order mutt should
3607 try them.  Authentication methods are either 'user', 'apop' or any
3608 SASL mechanism, eg 'digest-md5', 'gssapi' or 'cram-md5'.
3609 This parameter is case-insensitive. If this parameter is unset
3610 (the default) mutt will try all available methods, in order from
3611 most-secure to least-secure.
3612 .IP
3613 Example: set pop_authenticators=\(rqdigest-md5:apop:user\(rq
3614
3615
3616 .TP
3617 .B pop_auth_try_all
3618 .nf
3619 Type: boolean
3620 Default: yes
3621 .fi
3622 .IP
3623 If set, Mutt will try all available methods. When unset, Mutt will
3624 only fall back to other authentication methods if the previous
3625 methods are unavailable. If a method is available but authentication
3626 fails, Mutt will not connect to the POP server.
3627
3628
3629 .TP
3630 .B pop_checkinterval
3631 .nf
3632 Type: number
3633 Default: 60
3634 .fi
3635 .IP
3636 This variable configures how often (in seconds) POP should look for
3637 new mail.
3638
3639
3640 .TP
3641 .B pop_delete
3642 .nf
3643 Type: quadoption
3644 Default: ask-no
3645 .fi
3646 .IP
3647 If set, Mutt will delete successfully downloaded messages from the POP
3648 server when using the fetch-mail function.  When unset, Mutt will
3649 download messages but also leave them on the POP server.
3650
3651
3652 .TP
3653 .B pop_host
3654 .nf
3655 Type: string
3656 Default: \(lq\(rq
3657 .fi
3658 .IP
3659 The name of your POP server for the fetch-mail function.  You
3660 can also specify an alternative port, username and password, ie:
3661 .IP
3662 [pop[s]://][username[:password]@]popserver[:port]
3663
3664
3665 .TP
3666 .B pop_last
3667 .nf
3668 Type: boolean
3669 Default: no
3670 .fi
3671 .IP
3672 If this variable is set, mutt will try to use the \(rqLAST\(rq POP command
3673 for retrieving only unread messages from the POP server when using
3674 the fetch-mail function.
3675
3676
3677 .TP
3678 .B pop_reconnect
3679 .nf
3680 Type: quadoption
3681 Default: ask-yes
3682 .fi
3683 .IP
3684 Controls whether or not Mutt will try to reconnect to POP server when
3685 connection lost.
3686
3687
3688 .TP
3689 .B pop_user
3690 .nf
3691 Type: string
3692 Default: \(lq\(rq
3693 .fi
3694 .IP
3695 Your login name on the POP server.
3696 .IP
3697 This variable defaults to your user name on the local machine.
3698
3699
3700 .TP
3701 .B pop_pass
3702 .nf
3703 Type: string
3704 Default: \(lq\(rq
3705 .fi
3706 .IP
3707 Specifies the password for your POP account.  If unset, Mutt will
3708 prompt you for your password when you open POP mailbox.
3709 \fBWarning\fP: you should only use this option when you are on a
3710 fairly secure machine, because the superuser can read your muttrc
3711 even if you are the only one who can read the file.
3712
3713
3714 .TP
3715 .B post_indent_string
3716 .nf
3717 Type: string
3718 Default: \(lq\(rq
3719 .fi
3720 .IP
3721 Similar to the \(lq$attribution\(rq variable, Mutt will append this
3722 string after the inclusion of a message which is being replied to.
3723
3724
3725 .TP
3726 .B post_moderated
3727 .nf
3728 Type: quadoption
3729 Default: ask-yes
3730 .fi
3731 .IP
3732 If set to \fIyes\fP, Mutt will post article to newsgroup that have
3733 not permissions to posting (e.g. moderated).  \fBNote:\fP if newsserver
3734 does not support posting to that newsgroup or totally read-only, that
3735 posting will not have an effect.
3736
3737
3738 .TP
3739 .B postpone
3740 .nf
3741 Type: quadoption
3742 Default: ask-yes
3743 .fi
3744 .IP
3745 Controls whether or not messages are saved in the \(lq$postponed\(rq
3746 mailbox when you elect not to send immediately.
3747
3748
3749 .TP
3750 .B postponed
3751 .nf
3752 Type: path
3753 Default: \(lq~/postponed\(rq
3754 .fi
3755 .IP
3756 Mutt allows you to indefinitely \(lqpostpone sending a message\(rq which
3757 you are editing.  When you choose to postpone a message, Mutt saves it
3758 in the mailbox specified by this variable.  Also see the \(lq$postpone\(rq
3759 variable.
3760
3761
3762 .TP
3763 .B preconnect
3764 .nf
3765 Type: string
3766 Default: \(lq\(rq
3767 .fi
3768 .IP
3769 If set, a shell command to be executed if mutt fails to establish
3770 a connection to the server. This is useful for setting up secure
3771 connections, e.g. with ssh(1). If the command returns a  nonzero
3772 status, mutt gives up opening the server. Example:
3773 .IP
3774 preconnect=\(rqssh -f -q -L 1234:mailhost.net:143 mailhost.net
3775 sleep 20 < /dev/null > /dev/null\(rq
3776 .IP
3777 Mailbox 'foo' on mailhost.net can now be reached
3778 as '{localhost:1234}foo'.
3779 .IP
3780 NOTE: For this example to work, you must be able to log in to the
3781 remote machine without having to enter a password.
3782
3783
3784 .TP
3785 .B print
3786 .nf
3787 Type: quadoption
3788 Default: ask-no
3789 .fi
3790 .IP
3791 Controls whether or not Mutt asks for confirmation before printing.
3792 This is useful for people (like me) who accidentally hit \(lqp\(rq often.
3793
3794
3795 .TP
3796 .B print_command
3797 .nf
3798 Type: path
3799 Default: \(lqlpr\(rq
3800 .fi
3801 .IP
3802 This specifies the command pipe that should be used to print messages.
3803
3804
3805 .TP
3806 .B print_decode
3807 .nf
3808 Type: boolean
3809 Default: yes
3810 .fi
3811 .IP
3812 Used in connection with the print-message command.  If this
3813 option is set, the message is decoded before it is passed to the
3814 external command specified by $print_command.  If this option
3815 is unset, no processing will be applied to the message when
3816 printing it.  The latter setting may be useful if you are using
3817 some advanced printer filter which is able to properly format
3818 e-mail messages for printing.
3819
3820
3821 .TP
3822 .B print_split
3823 .nf
3824 Type: boolean
3825 Default: no
3826 .fi
3827 .IP
3828 Used in connection with the print-message command.  If this option
3829 is set, the command specified by $print_command is executed once for
3830 each message which is to be printed.  If this option is unset, 
3831 the command specified by $print_command is executed only once, and
3832 all the messages are concatenated, with a form feed as the message
3833 separator.
3834 .IP
3835 Those who use the \fBenscript\fP(1) program's mail-printing mode will
3836 most likely want to set this option.
3837
3838
3839 .TP
3840 .B prompt_after
3841 .nf
3842 Type: boolean
3843 Default: yes
3844 .fi
3845 .IP
3846 If you use an \fIexternal\fP \(lq$pager\(rq, setting this variable will
3847 cause Mutt to prompt you for a command when the pager exits rather
3848 than returning to the index menu.  If unset, Mutt will return to the
3849 index menu when the external pager exits.
3850
3851
3852 .TP
3853 .B query_command
3854 .nf
3855 Type: path
3856 Default: \(lq\(rq
3857 .fi
3858 .IP
3859 This specifies the command that mutt will use to make external address
3860 queries.  The string should contain a %s, which will be substituted
3861 with the query string the user types.  See \(lqquery\(rq for more
3862 information.
3863
3864
3865 .TP
3866 .B quit
3867 .nf
3868 Type: quadoption
3869 Default: yes
3870 .fi
3871 .IP
3872 This variable controls whether \(lqquit\(rq and \(lqexit\(rq actually quit
3873 from mutt.  If it set to yes, they do quit, if it is set to no, they
3874 have no effect, and if it is set to ask-yes or ask-no, you are
3875 prompted for confirmation when you try to quit.
3876
3877
3878 .TP
3879 .B quote_empty
3880 .nf
3881 Type: boolean
3882 Default: yes
3883 .fi
3884 .IP
3885 Controls whether or not empty lines will be quoted using
3886 \(lqindent_string\(rq.
3887
3888
3889 .TP
3890 .B quote_quoted
3891 .nf
3892 Type: boolean
3893 Default: no
3894 .fi
3895 .IP
3896 Controls how quoted lines will be quoted. If set, one quote
3897 character will be added to the end of existing prefix.  Otherwise,
3898 quoted lines will be prepended by \(lqindent_string\(rq.
3899
3900
3901 .TP
3902 .B quote_regexp
3903 .nf
3904 Type: regular expression
3905 Default: \(lq^([ \\t]*[|>:}#])+\(rq
3906 .fi
3907 .IP
3908 A regular expression used in the internal-pager to determine quoted
3909 sections of text in the body of a message.
3910 .IP
3911 \fBNote:\fP In order to use the \fIquoted\fP\fBx\fP patterns in the
3912 internal pager, you need to set this to a regular expression that
3913 matches \fIexactly\fP the quote characters at the beginning of quoted
3914 lines.
3915
3916
3917 .TP
3918 .B read_inc
3919 .nf
3920 Type: number
3921 Default: 10
3922 .fi
3923 .IP
3924 If set to a value greater than 0, Mutt will display which message it
3925 is currently on when reading a mailbox.  The message is printed after
3926 \fIread_inc\fP messages have been read (e.g., if set to 25, Mutt will
3927 print a message when it reads message 25, and then again when it gets
3928 to message 50).  This variable is meant to indicate progress when
3929 reading large mailboxes which may take some time.
3930 When set to 0, only a single message will appear before the reading
3931 the mailbox.
3932 .IP
3933 Also see the \(lq$write_inc\(rq variable.
3934
3935
3936 .TP
3937 .B read_only
3938 .nf
3939 Type: boolean
3940 Default: no
3941 .fi
3942 .IP
3943 If set, all folders are opened in read-only mode.
3944
3945
3946 .TP
3947 .B realname
3948 .nf
3949 Type: string
3950 Default: \(lq\(rq
3951 .fi
3952 .IP
3953 This variable specifies what \(rqreal\(rq or \(rqpersonal\(rq name should be used
3954 when sending messages.
3955 .IP
3956 By default, this is the GECOS field from /etc/passwd.  Note that this
3957 variable will \fInot\fP be used when the user has set a real name
3958 in the $from variable.
3959
3960
3961 .TP
3962 .B recall
3963 .nf
3964 Type: quadoption
3965 Default: ask-yes
3966 .fi
3967 .IP
3968 Controls whether or not you are prompted to recall postponed messages
3969 when composing a new message.  Also see \(lq$postponed\(rq.
3970 .IP
3971 Setting this variable to \(lqyes\(rq is not generally useful, and thus not
3972 recommended.
3973
3974
3975 .TP
3976 .B record
3977 .nf
3978 Type: path
3979 Default: \(lq\(rq
3980 .fi
3981 .IP
3982 This specifies the file into which your outgoing messages should be
3983 appended.  (This is meant as the primary method for saving a copy of
3984 your messages, but another way to do this is using the \(lqmy_hdr\(rq
3985 command to create a \fIBcc:\fP field with your email address in it.)
3986 .IP
3987 The value of \fI$record\fP is overridden by the \(lq$force_name\(rq and
3988 \(lq$save_name\(rq variables, and the \(lqfcc-hook\(rq command.
3989
3990
3991 .TP
3992 .B reply_regexp
3993 .nf
3994 Type: regular expression
3995 Default: \(lq^(re([\\[0-9\\]+])*|aw):[ \\t]*\(rq
3996 .fi
3997 .IP
3998 A regular expression used to recognize reply messages when threading
3999 and replying. The default value corresponds to the English \(rqRe:\(rq and
4000 the German \(rqAw:\(rq.
4001
4002
4003 .TP
4004 .B reply_self
4005 .nf
4006 Type: boolean
4007 Default: no
4008 .fi
4009 .IP
4010 If unset and you are replying to a message sent by you, Mutt will
4011 assume that you want to reply to the recipients of that message rather
4012 than to yourself.
4013
4014
4015 .TP
4016 .B reply_to
4017 .nf
4018 Type: quadoption
4019 Default: ask-yes
4020 .fi
4021 .IP
4022 If set, Mutt will ask you if you want to use the address listed in the
4023 Reply-To: header field when replying to a message.  If you answer no,
4024 it will use the address in the From: header field instead.  This
4025 option is useful for reading a mailing list that sets the Reply-To:
4026 header field to the list address and you want to send a private
4027 message to the author of a message.
4028
4029
4030 .TP
4031 .B resolve
4032 .nf
4033 Type: boolean
4034 Default: yes
4035 .fi
4036 .IP
4037 When set, the cursor will be automatically advanced to the next
4038 (possibly undeleted) message whenever a command that modifies the
4039 current message is executed.
4040
4041
4042 .TP
4043 .B reverse_alias
4044 .nf
4045 Type: boolean
4046 Default: no
4047 .fi
4048 .IP
4049 This variable controls whether or not Mutt will display the \(rqpersonal\(rq
4050 name from your aliases in the index menu if it finds an alias that
4051 matches the message's sender.  For example, if you have the following
4052 alias:
4053 .IP
4054
4055 .IP
4056 .DS
4057 .sp
4058 .ft CR
4059 .nf
4060 alias juser abd30425@somewhere.net (Joe User)
4061
4062 .fi
4063 .ec
4064 .ft P
4065 .sp
4066 .IP
4067 and then you receive mail which contains the following header:
4068 .IP
4069
4070 .IP
4071 .DS
4072 .sp
4073 .ft CR
4074 .nf
4075 From: abd30425@somewhere.net
4076
4077 .fi
4078 .ec
4079 .ft P
4080 .sp
4081 .IP
4082 It would be displayed in the index menu as \(lqJoe User\(rq instead of
4083 \(lqabd30425@somewhere.net.\(rq  This is useful when the person's e-mail
4084 address is not human friendly (like CompuServe addresses).
4085
4086
4087 .TP
4088 .B reverse_name
4089 .nf
4090 Type: boolean
4091 Default: no
4092 .fi
4093 .IP
4094 It may sometimes arrive that you receive mail to a certain machine,
4095 move the messages to another machine, and reply to some the messages
4096 from there.  If this variable is set, the default \fIFrom:\fP line of
4097 the reply messages is built using the address where you received the
4098 messages you are replying to.  If the variable is unset, the
4099 \fIFrom:\fP line will use your address on the current machine.
4100
4101
4102 .TP
4103 .B reverse_realname
4104 .nf
4105 Type: boolean
4106 Default: yes
4107 .fi
4108 .IP
4109 This variable fine-tunes the behaviour of the reverse_name feature.
4110 When it is set, mutt will use the address from incoming messages as-is,
4111 possibly including eventual real names.  When it is unset, mutt will
4112 override any such real names with the setting of the realname variable.
4113
4114
4115 .TP
4116 .B rfc2047_parameters
4117 .nf
4118 Type: boolean
4119 Default: no
4120 .fi
4121 .IP
4122 When this variable is set, Mutt will decode RFC-2047-encoded MIME 
4123 parameters. You want to set this variable when mutt suggests you
4124 to save attachments to files named like this: 
4125 =?iso-8859-1?Q?file=5F=E4=5F991116=2Ezip?=
4126 .IP
4127 When this variable is set interactively, the change doesn't have
4128 the desired effect before you have changed folders.
4129 .IP
4130 Note that this use of RFC 2047's encoding is explicitly,
4131 prohibited by the standard, but nevertheless encountered in the
4132 wild.
4133 Also note that setting this parameter will \fInot\fP have the effect 
4134 that mutt \fIgenerates\fP this kind of encoding.  Instead, mutt will
4135 unconditionally use the encoding specified in RFC 2231.
4136
4137
4138 .TP
4139 .B save_address
4140 .nf
4141 Type: boolean
4142 Default: no
4143 .fi
4144 .IP
4145 If set, mutt will take the sender's full address when choosing a
4146 default folder for saving a mail. If \(lq$save_name\(rq or \(lq$force_name\(rq
4147 is set too, the selection of the fcc folder will be changed as well.
4148
4149
4150 .TP
4151 .B save_empty
4152 .nf
4153 Type: boolean
4154 Default: yes
4155 .fi
4156 .IP
4157 When unset, mailboxes which contain no saved messages will be removed
4158 when closed (the exception is \(lq$spoolfile\(rq which is never removed).
4159 If set, mailboxes are never removed.
4160 .IP
4161 \fBNote:\fP This only applies to mbox and MMDF folders, Mutt does not
4162 delete MH and Maildir directories.
4163
4164
4165 .TP
4166 .B save_name
4167 .nf
4168 Type: boolean
4169 Default: no
4170 .fi
4171 .IP
4172 This variable controls how copies of outgoing messages are saved.
4173 When set, a check is made to see if a mailbox specified by the
4174 recipient address exists (this is done by searching for a mailbox in
4175 the \(lq$folder\(rq directory with the \fIusername\fP part of the
4176 recipient address).  If the mailbox exists, the outgoing message will
4177 be saved to that mailbox, otherwise the message is saved to the
4178 \(lq$record\(rq mailbox.
4179 .IP
4180 Also see the \(lq$force_name\(rq variable.
4181
4182
4183 .TP
4184 .B score
4185 .nf
4186 Type: boolean
4187 Default: yes
4188 .fi
4189 .IP
4190 When this variable is \fIunset\fP, scoring is turned off.  This can
4191 be useful to selectively disable scoring for certain folders when the
4192 \(lq$score_threshold_delete\(rq variable and friends are used.
4193
4194
4195 .TP
4196 .B score_threshold_delete
4197 .nf
4198 Type: number
4199 Default: -1
4200 .fi
4201 .IP
4202 Messages which have been assigned a score equal to or lower than the value
4203 of this variable are automatically marked for deletion by mutt.  Since
4204 mutt scores are always greater than or equal to zero, the default setting
4205 of this variable will never mark a message for deletion.
4206
4207
4208 .TP
4209 .B score_threshold_flag
4210 .nf
4211 Type: number
4212 Default: 9999
4213 .fi
4214 .IP
4215 Messages which have been assigned a score greater than or equal to this 
4216 variable's value are automatically marked \(rqflagged\(rq.
4217
4218
4219 .TP
4220 .B score_threshold_read
4221 .nf
4222 Type: number
4223 Default: -1
4224 .fi
4225 .IP
4226 Messages which have been assigned a score equal to or lower than the value
4227 of this variable are automatically marked as read by mutt.  Since
4228 mutt scores are always greater than or equal to zero, the default setting
4229 of this variable will never mark a message read.
4230
4231
4232 .TP
4233 .B send_charset
4234 .nf
4235 Type: string
4236 Default: \(lqus-ascii:iso-8859-1:utf-8\(rq
4237 .fi
4238 .IP
4239 A list of character sets for outgoing messages. Mutt will use the
4240 first character set into which the text can be converted exactly.
4241 If your \(lq$charset\(rq is not iso-8859-1 and recipients may not
4242 understand UTF-8, it is advisable to include in the list an
4243 appropriate widely used standard character set (such as
4244 iso-8859-2, koi8-r or iso-2022-jp) either instead of or after
4245 \(rqiso-8859-1\(rq.
4246
4247
4248 .TP
4249 .B sendmail
4250 .nf
4251 Type: path
4252 Default: \(lq/usr/sbin/sendmail -oem -oi\(rq
4253 .fi
4254 .IP
4255 Specifies the program and arguments used to deliver mail sent by Mutt.
4256 Mutt expects that the specified program interprets additional
4257 arguments as recipient addresses.
4258
4259
4260 .TP
4261 .B sendmail_wait
4262 .nf
4263 Type: number
4264 Default: 0
4265 .fi
4266 .IP
4267 Specifies the number of seconds to wait for the \(lq$sendmail\(rq process
4268 to finish before giving up and putting delivery in the background.
4269 .IP
4270 Mutt interprets the value of this variable as follows:
4271
4272 .RS
4273 .IP >0 
4274 number of seconds to wait for sendmail to finish before continuing
4275