always build POP support, we do a /mail/ client, right ?
[apps/madmutt.git] / init.h
1 /*
2  * Copyright notice from original mutt:
3  * Copyright (C) 1996-2002 Michael R. Elkins <me@mutt.org>
4  * Copyright (C) 2004 g10 Code GmbH
5  *
6  * Parts were writte/modified by:
7  * Nico Golde <nico@ngolde.de>
8  *
9  * This file is part of mutt-ng, see http://www.muttng.org/.
10  * It's licensed under the GNU General Public License,
11  * please see the file GPL in the top level source directory.
12  */
13
14 #ifdef _MAKEDOC
15 # include "config.h"
16 #else
17 # include "sort.h"
18 #endif
19
20 #include "buffy.h"
21 #include "mutt.h"
22 #include "version.h"
23 #include "lib/debug.h"
24
25 #ifndef _MAKEDOC
26 #define DT_MASK         0x0f
27 #define DT_BOOL         1       /* boolean option */
28 #define DT_NUM          2       /* a number */
29 #define DT_STR          3       /* a string */
30 #define DT_PATH         4       /* a pathname */
31 #define DT_QUAD         5       /* quad-option (yes/no/ask-yes/ask-no) */
32 #define DT_SORT         6       /* sorting methods */
33 #define DT_RX           7       /* regular expressions */
34 #define DT_MAGIC        8       /* mailbox type */
35 #define DT_SYN          9       /* synonym for another variable */
36 #define DT_ADDR         10      /* e-mail address */
37 #define DT_USER         11      /* user defined via $user_ */
38 #define DT_SYS          12      /* pre-defined via $muttng_ */
39
40 #define DTYPE(x) ((x) & DT_MASK)
41
42 /* subtypes */
43 #define DT_SUBTYPE_MASK 0xf0
44 #define DT_SORT_ALIAS   0x10
45 #define DT_SORT_BROWSER 0x20
46 #define DT_SORT_KEYS    0x40
47 #define DT_SORT_AUX     0x80
48
49 /* flags to parse_set() */
50 #define M_SET_INV       (1<<0)  /* default is to invert all vars */
51 #define M_SET_UNSET     (1<<1)  /* default is to unset all vars */
52 #define M_SET_RESET     (1<<2)  /* default is to reset all vars to default */
53
54 /* forced redraw/resort types */
55 #define R_NONE          0
56 #define R_INDEX         (1<<0)
57 #define R_PAGER         (1<<1)
58 #define R_RESORT        (1<<2)  /* resort the mailbox */
59 #define R_RESORT_SUB    (1<<3)  /* resort subthreads */
60 #define R_RESORT_INIT   (1<<4)  /* resort from scratch */
61 #define R_TREE          (1<<5)  /* redraw the thread tree */
62 #define R_BOTH          (R_INDEX|R_PAGER)
63 #define R_RESORT_BOTH   (R_RESORT|R_RESORT_SUB)
64
65 struct option_t {
66   const char *option;
67   short type;
68   short flags;
69   unsigned long data;
70   const char *init;
71 };
72
73 #define UL (unsigned long)
74
75 #endif /* _MAKEDOC */
76
77 #ifndef ISPELL
78 #define ISPELL "ispell"
79 #endif
80
81 /* build complete documentation */
82
83 #ifdef _MAKEDOC
84 # ifndef USE_IMAP
85 #  define USE_IMAP
86 # endif
87 # ifndef MIXMASTER
88 #  define MIXMASTER "mixmaster"
89 # endif
90 # ifndef USE_SSL
91 #  define USE_SSL
92 # endif
93 # ifndef USE_LIBESMTP
94 #  define USE_LIBESMTP
95 # endif
96 # ifndef USE_NNTP
97 #  define USE_NNTP
98 # endif
99 # ifndef USE_GNUTLS
100 #  define USE_GNUTLS
101 # endif
102 # ifndef USE_DOTLOCK
103 #  define USE_DOTLOCK
104 # endif
105 # ifndef USE_HCACHE
106 #  define USE_HCACHE
107 # endif
108 # ifndef HAVE_LIBIDN
109 #  define HAVE_LIBIDN
110 # endif
111 # ifndef HAVE_GETADDRINFO
112 #  define HAVE_GETADDRINFO
113 # endif
114 #endif
115
116 struct option_t MuttVars[] = {
117   /*++*/
118   {"abort_noattach", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_ATTACH, "no" },
119   /*
120    ** .pp
121    ** This variable specifies whether to abort sending if no attachment
122    ** was made but the content references them, i.e. the content
123    ** matches the regular expression given in
124    ** $$attach_remind_regexp. If a match was found and this
125    ** variable is set to \fIyes\fP, message sending will be aborted
126    ** but the mail will be send nevertheless if set to \fIno\fP.
127    **
128    ** .pp
129    ** This variable and $$attach_remind_regexp are intended to
130    ** remind the user to attach files if the message's text
131    ** references them.
132    **
133    ** .pp
134    ** See also the $$attach_remind_regexp variable.
135    */
136   {"abort_nosubject", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_SUBJECT, "ask-yes" },
137   /*
138    ** .pp
139    ** If set to \fIyes\fP, when composing messages and no subject is given
140    ** at the subject prompt, composition will be aborted.  If set to
141    ** \fIno\fP, composing messages with no subject given at the subject
142    ** prompt will never be aborted.
143    */
144   {"abort_unmodified", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_ABORT, "yes" },
145   /*
146    ** .pp
147    ** If set to \fIyes\fP, composition will automatically abort after
148    ** editing the message body if no changes are made to the file (this
149    ** check only happens after the \fIfirst\fP edit of the file).  When set
150    ** to \fIno\fP, composition will never be aborted.
151    */
152   {"alias_file", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &AliasFile, "~/.muttngrc"},
153   /*
154    ** .pp
155    ** The default file in which to save aliases created by the 
156    ** ``$create-alias'' function.
157    ** .pp
158    ** \fBNote:\fP Mutt-ng will not automatically source this file; you must
159    ** explicitly use the ``$source'' command for it to be executed.
160    */
161   {"alias_format", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &AliasFmt, "%4n %2f %t %-10a   %r"},
162   /*
163    ** .pp
164    ** Specifies the format of the data displayed for the ``alias'' menu. The
165    ** following \fTprintf(3)\fP-style sequences are available:
166    ** .pp
167    ** .dl
168    ** .dt %a .dd alias name
169    ** .dt %f .dd flags - currently, a "d" for an alias marked for deletion
170    ** .dt %n .dd index number
171    ** .dt %r .dd address which alias expands to
172    ** .dt %t .dd character which indicates if the alias is tagged for inclusion
173    ** .de
174    */
175   {"allow_8bit", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTALLOW8BIT, "yes" },
176   /*
177    ** .pp
178    ** Controls whether 8-bit data is converted to 7-bit using either
179    ** \fTquoted-printable\fP or \fTbase64\fP encoding when sending mail.
180    */
181   {"allow_ansi", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTALLOWANSI, "no" },
182   /*
183    ** .pp
184    ** Controls whether ANSI color codes in messages (and color tags in 
185    ** rich text messages) are to be interpreted.
186    ** Messages containing these codes are rare, but if this option is set,
187    ** their text will be colored accordingly. Note that this may override
188    ** your color choices, and even present a security problem, since a
189    ** message could include a line like ``\fT[-- PGP output follows ...\fP" and
190    ** give it the same color as your attachment color.
191    */
192   {"arrow_cursor", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTARROWCURSOR, "no" },
193   /*
194    ** .pp
195    ** When \fIset\fP, an arrow (``\fT->\fP'') will be used to indicate the current entry
196    ** in menus instead of highlighting the whole line.  On slow network or modem
197    ** links this will make response faster because there is less that has to
198    ** be redrawn on the screen when moving to the next or previous entries
199    ** in the menu.
200    */
201   {"ascii_chars", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTASCIICHARS, "no" },
202   /*
203    ** .pp
204    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will use plain ASCII characters when displaying thread
205    ** and attachment trees, instead of the default \fTACS\fP characters.
206    */
207   {"askbcc", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTASKBCC, "no" },
208   /*
209    ** .pp
210    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will prompt you for blind-carbon-copy (Bcc) recipients
211    ** before editing an outgoing message.
212    */
213   {"askcc", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTASKCC, "no" },
214   /*
215    ** .pp
216    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will prompt you for carbon-copy (Cc) recipients before
217    ** editing the body of an outgoing message.
218    */
219   {"assumed_charset", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &AssumedCharset, "us-ascii"},
220   /*
221    ** .pp
222    ** This variable is a colon-separated list of character encoding
223    ** schemes for messages without character encoding indication.
224    ** Header field values and message body content without character encoding
225    ** indication would be assumed that they are written in one of this list.
226    ** By default, all the header fields and message body without any charset
227    ** indication are assumed to be in \fTus-ascii\fP.
228    ** .pp
229    ** For example, Japanese users might prefer this:
230    ** .pp
231    ** \fTset assumed_charset="iso-2022-jp:euc-jp:shift_jis:utf-8"\fP
232    ** .pp
233    ** However, only the first content is valid for the message body.
234    ** This variable is valid only if $$strict_mime is unset.
235    */
236 #ifdef USE_NNTP
237   {"nntp_ask_followup_to", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTASKFOLLOWUP, "no" },
238   /*
239    ** .pp
240    ** Availability: NNTP
241    **
242    ** .pp
243    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will prompt you for the \fTFollowup-To:\fP header
244    ** field before editing the body of an outgoing news article.
245    */
246   {"nntp_ask_x_comment_to", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTASKXCOMMENTTO, "no" },
247   /*
248    ** .pp
249    ** Availability: NNTP
250    **
251    ** .pp
252    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will prompt you for the \fTX-Comment-To:\fP header
253    ** field before editing the body of an outgoing news article.
254    */
255 #endif
256   {"attach_format", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &AttachFormat, "%u%D%I %t%4n %T%.40d%> [%.7m/%.10M, %.6e%?C?, %C?, %s] "},
257   /*
258    ** .pp
259    ** This variable describes the format of the ``attachment'' menu.  The
260    ** following \fTprintf(3)\fP-style sequences are understood:
261    ** .pp
262    ** .dl
263    ** .dt %C  .dd charset
264    ** .dt %c  .dd requires charset conversion (n or c)
265    ** .dt %D  .dd deleted flag
266    ** .dt %d  .dd description
267    ** .dt %e  .dd MIME \fTContent-Transfer-Encoding:\fP header field
268    ** .dt %f  .dd filename
269    ** .dt %I  .dd MIME \fTContent-Disposition:\fP header field (\fTI\fP=inline, \fTA\fP=attachment)
270    ** .dt %m  .dd major MIME type
271    ** .dt %M  .dd MIME subtype
272    ** .dt %n  .dd attachment number
273    ** .dt %Q  .dd "Q", if MIME part qualifies for attachment counting
274    ** .dt %s  .dd size
275    ** .dt %t  .dd tagged flag
276    ** .dt %T  .dd graphic tree characters
277    ** .dt %u  .dd unlink (=to delete) flag
278    ** .dt %X  .dd number of qualifying MIME parts in this part and its children
279    ** .dt %>X .dd right justify the rest of the string and pad with character "X"
280    ** .dt %|X .dd pad to the end of the line with character "X"
281    ** .de
282    */
283   {"attach_remind_regexp", DT_RX, R_NONE, UL &AttachRemindRegexp, "attach"},
284   /*
285    ** .pp
286    ** If this variable is non-empty, muttng will scan a message's contents
287    ** before sending for this regular expression. If it is found, it will
288    ** ask for what to do depending on the setting of $$abort_noattach.
289    ** .pp
290    ** This variable and $$abort_noattach are intended to remind the user
291    ** to attach files if the message's text references them.
292    */
293   {"attach_sep", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &AttachSep, "\n"},
294   /*
295    ** .pp
296    ** The separator to add between attachments when operating (saving,
297    ** printing, piping, etc) on a list of tagged attachments.
298    */
299   {"attach_split", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTATTACHSPLIT, "yes" },
300   /*
301    ** .pp
302    ** If this variable is \fIunset\fP, when operating (saving, printing, piping,
303    ** etc) on a list of tagged attachments, Mutt-ng will concatenate the
304    ** attachments and will operate on them as a single attachment. The
305    ** ``$$attach_sep'' separator is added after each attachment. When \fIset\fP,
306    ** Mutt-ng will operate on the attachments one by one.
307    */
308   {"attribution", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &Attribution, "On %d, %n wrote:"},
309   /*
310    ** .pp
311    ** This is the string that will precede a message which has been included
312    ** in a reply.  For a full listing of defined \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences see
313    ** the section on ``$$index_format''.
314    */
315   {"autoedit", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTAUTOEDIT, "no" },
316   /*
317    ** .pp
318    ** When \fIset\fP along with ``$$edit_headers'', Mutt-ng will skip the initial
319    ** send-menu and allow you to immediately begin editing the body of your
320    ** message.  The send-menu may still be accessed once you have finished
321    ** editing the body of your message.
322    ** .pp
323    ** Also see ``$$fast_reply''.
324    */
325   {"auto_tag", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTAUTOTAG, "no" },
326   /*
327    ** .pp
328    ** When \fIset\fP, functions in the \fIindex\fP menu which affect a message
329    ** will be applied to all tagged messages (if there are any).  When
330    ** unset, you must first use the ``tag-prefix'' function (default: "\fT;\fP") to
331    ** make the next function apply to all tagged messages.
332    */
333   {"beep", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTBEEP, "yes" },
334   /*
335    ** .pp
336    ** When this variable is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will beep when an error occurs.
337    */
338   {"beep_new", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTBEEPNEW, "no" },
339   /*
340    ** .pp
341    ** When this variable is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will beep whenever it prints a message
342    ** notifying you of new mail.  This is independent of the setting of the
343    ** ``$$beep'' variable.
344    */
345   {"bounce", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_BOUNCE, "ask-yes" },
346   /*
347    ** .pp
348    ** Controls whether you will be asked to confirm bouncing messages.
349    ** If set to \fIyes\fP you don't get asked if you want to bounce a
350    ** message. Setting this variable to \fIno\fP is not generally useful,
351    ** and thus not recommended, because you are unable to bounce messages.
352    */
353   {"bounce_delivered", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTBOUNCEDELIVERED, "yes" },
354   /*
355    ** .pp
356    ** When this variable is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will include 
357    ** \fTDelivered-To:\fP header fields when bouncing messages.
358    ** Postfix users may wish to \fIunset\fP this variable.
359    */
360   { "braille_friendly", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTBRAILLEFRIENDLY, "no" },
361   /*
362    ** .pp
363    ** When this variable is set, mutt will place the cursor at the beginning
364    ** of the current line in menus, even when the arrow_cursor variable
365    ** is unset, making it easier for blind persons using Braille displays to 
366    ** follow these menus.  The option is disabled by default because many 
367    ** visual terminals don't permit making the cursor invisible.
368    */
369 #ifdef USE_NNTP
370   {"nntp_catchup", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_CATCHUP, "ask-yes" },
371   /*
372    ** .pp
373    ** Availability: NNTP
374    **
375    ** .pp
376    ** If this variable is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will mark all articles in a newsgroup
377    ** as read when you leaving it.
378    */
379 #endif
380   {"charset", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &Charset, "" },
381   /*
382    ** .pp
383    ** Character set your terminal uses to display and enter textual data.
384    */
385   {"check_new", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCHECKNEW, "yes" },
386   /*
387    ** .pp
388    ** \fBNote:\fP this option only affects \fImaildir\fP and \fIMH\fP style
389    ** mailboxes.
390    ** .pp
391    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will check for new mail delivered while the
392    ** mailbox is open.  Especially with MH mailboxes, this operation can
393    ** take quite some time since it involves scanning the directory and
394    ** checking each file to see if it has already been looked at.  If it's
395    ** \fIunset\fP, no check for new mail is performed while the mailbox is open.
396    */
397   {"collapse_unread", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCOLLAPSEUNREAD, "yes" },
398   /*
399    ** .pp
400    ** When \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will not collapse a thread if it contains any
401    ** unread messages.
402    */
403   {"count_attachments", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCOUNTATTACH, "yes"},
404   /*
405    ** .pp
406    ** This variable controls whether attachments should be counted for $$$index_format
407    ** and its \fT%X\fP expando or not. As for scoring, this variable can be used to
408    ** selectively turn counting on or off instead of removing and re-adding rules as
409    ** prefered because counting requires full loading of messages.
410    ** .pp
411    ** If it is \fIset\fP and rules were defined via the \fTattachments\fP and/or
412    ** \fTunattachments\fP commands, counting will be done. If it is \fIunset\fP no
413    ** counting will be done regardless whether rules were defined or not.
414    */
415   {"uncollapse_jump", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTUNCOLLAPSEJUMP, "no" },
416   /*
417    ** .pp
418    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will jump to the next unread message, if any,
419    ** when the current thread is \fIun\fPcollapsed.
420    */
421   {"compose_format", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &ComposeFormat, "-- Mutt-ng: Compose  [Approx. msg size: %l   Atts: %a]%>-"},
422   /*
423    ** .pp
424    ** Controls the format of the status line displayed in the ``compose''
425    ** menu.  This string is similar to ``$$status_format'', but has its own
426    ** set of \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences:
427    ** .pp
428    ** .dl
429    ** .dt %a .dd total number of attachments 
430    ** .dt %h .dd local hostname
431    ** .dt %l .dd approximate size (in bytes) of the current message
432    ** .dt %v .dd Mutt-ng version string
433    ** .de
434    ** .pp
435    ** See the text describing the ``$$status_format'' option for more 
436    ** information on how to set ``$$compose_format''.
437    */
438   {"config_charset", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &ConfigCharset, "" },
439   /*
440    ** .pp
441    ** When defined, Mutt-ng will recode commands in rc files from this
442    ** encoding.
443    */
444   {"confirmappend", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCONFIRMAPPEND, "yes" },
445   /*
446    ** .pp
447    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will prompt for confirmation when appending messages to
448    ** an existing mailbox.
449    */
450   {"confirmcreate", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCONFIRMCREATE, "yes" },
451   /*
452    ** .pp
453    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will prompt for confirmation when saving messages to a
454    ** mailbox which does not yet exist before creating it.
455    */
456   {"connect_timeout", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &ConnectTimeout, "30" },
457   /*
458    ** .pp
459    ** Causes Mutt-ng to timeout a network connection (for IMAP or POP) after this
460    ** many seconds if the connection is not able to be established.  A negative
461    ** value causes Mutt-ng to wait indefinitely for the connection to succeed.
462    */
463   {"content_type", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &ContentType, "text/plain"},
464   /*
465    ** .pp
466    ** Sets the default \fTContent-Type:\fP header field for the body
467    ** of newly composed messages.
468    */
469   {"copy", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_COPY, "yes" },
470   /*
471    ** .pp
472    ** This variable controls whether or not copies of your outgoing messages
473    ** will be saved for later references.  Also see ``$$record'',
474    ** ``$$save_name'', ``$$force_name'' and ``$fcc-hook''.
475    */
476
477   {"crypt_use_gpgme", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCRYPTUSEGPGME, "no" },
478   /*
479    ** .pp
480    ** This variable controls the use the GPGME enabled crypto backends.
481    ** If it is \fIset\fP and Mutt-ng was build with gpgme support, the gpgme code for
482    ** S/MIME and PGP will be used instead of the classic code.
483    ** .pp
484    ** \fBNote\fP: You need to use this option in your \fT.muttngrc\fP configuration
485    ** file as it won't have any effect when used interactively.
486    */
487
488   {"crypt_autopgp", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCRYPTAUTOPGP, "yes" },
489   /*
490    ** .pp
491    ** This variable controls whether or not Mutt-ng may automatically enable
492    ** PGP encryption/signing for messages.  See also ``$$crypt_autoencrypt'',
493    ** ``$$crypt_replyencrypt'',
494    ** ``$$crypt_autosign'', ``$$crypt_replysign'' and ``$$smime_is_default''.
495    */
496   {"crypt_autosmime", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCRYPTAUTOSMIME, "yes" },
497   /*
498    ** .pp
499    ** This variable controls whether or not Mutt-ng may automatically enable
500    ** S/MIME encryption/signing for messages. See also ``$$crypt_autoencrypt'',
501    ** ``$$crypt_replyencrypt'',
502    ** ``$$crypt_autosign'', ``$$crypt_replysign'' and ``$$smime_is_default''.
503    */
504   {"date_format", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &DateFmt, "!%a, %b %d, %Y at %I:%M:%S%p %Z"},
505   /*
506    ** .pp
507    ** This variable controls the format of the date printed by the ``\fT%d\fP''
508    ** sequence in ``$$index_format''.  This is passed to \fTstrftime(3)\fP
509    ** to process the date.
510    ** .pp
511    ** Unless the first character in the string is a bang (``\fT!\fP''), the month
512    ** and week day names are expanded according to the locale specified in
513    ** the variable ``$$locale''. If the first character in the string is a
514    ** bang, the bang is discarded, and the month and week day names in the
515    ** rest of the string are expanded in the \fIC\fP locale (that is in US
516    ** English).
517    */
518 #ifdef DEBUG
519   {"debug_level", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &DebugLevel, "1" },
520   /*
521    ** .pp
522    ** Availability: debug
523    **
524    ** .pp
525    ** This variable specifies the current debug level and
526    ** may be used to increase or decrease the verbosity level
527    ** during runtime. It overrides the level given with the
528    ** \fT-d\fP command line option.
529    **
530    ** .pp
531    ** Currently, this number must be >= 0 and <= 5 and muttng
532    ** must be started with \fT-d\fP to enable debugging at all;
533    ** enabling at runtime is not possible.
534    */
535 #endif
536   {"default_hook", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &DefaultHook, "~f %s !~P | (~P ~C %s)"},
537   /*
538    ** .pp
539    ** This variable controls how send-hooks, message-hooks, save-hooks,
540    ** and fcc-hooks will
541    ** be interpreted if they are specified with only a simple regexp,
542    ** instead of a matching pattern.  The hooks are expanded when they are
543    ** declared, so a hook will be interpreted according to the value of this
544    ** variable at the time the hook is declared.  The default value matches
545    ** if the message is either from a user matching the regular expression
546    ** given, or if it is from you (if the from address matches
547    ** ``alternates'') and is to or cc'ed to a user matching the given
548    ** regular expression.
549    */
550   {"delete", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_DELETE, "ask-yes" },
551   /*
552    ** .pp
553    ** Controls whether or not messages are really deleted when closing or
554    ** synchronizing a mailbox.  If set to \fIyes\fP, messages marked for
555    ** deleting will automatically be purged without prompting.  If set to
556    ** \fIno\fP, messages marked for deletion will be kept in the mailbox.
557    */
558   {"delete_space", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTDELSP, "no" },
559   /*
560    ** .pp
561    ** When sending messages with \fTformat=flowed\fP by \fIsetting\fP the
562    ** $$text_flowed variable, this variable specifies whether to also
563    ** set the \fTDelSp\fP parameter to \fTyes\fP. If this is \fIunset\fP,
564    ** no additional parameter will be send as a value of \fTno\fP already
565    ** is the default behavior.
566    **
567    ** .pp
568    ** \fBNote:\fP this variable only has an effect on \fIoutgoing\fP messages
569    ** (if $$text_flowed is \fIset\fP) but not on incomming.
570    */
571   {"delete_untag", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTDELETEUNTAG, "yes" },
572   /*
573    ** .pp
574    ** If this option is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will untag messages when marking them
575    ** for deletion.  This applies when you either explicitly delete a message,
576    ** or when you save it to another folder.
577    */
578   {"digest_collapse", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTDIGESTCOLLAPSE, "yes" },
579   /*
580    ** .pp
581    ** If this option is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng's received-attachments menu will not show the subparts of
582    ** individual messages in a multipart/digest.  To see these subparts, press 'v' on that menu.
583    */
584   {"display_filter", DT_PATH, R_PAGER, UL &DisplayFilter, ""},
585   /*
586    ** .pp
587    ** When \fIset\fP, specifies a command used to filter messages.  When a message
588    ** is viewed it is passed as standard input to $$display_filter, and the
589    ** filtered message is read from the standard output.
590    */
591 #if defined(USE_DOTLOCK)
592   {"dotlock_program", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &MuttDotlock, "$muttng_bindir/muttng_dotlock"},
593   /*
594    ** .pp
595    ** Availability: Dotlock
596    **
597    ** .pp
598    ** Contains the path of the \fTmuttng_dotlock(1)\fP binary to be used by
599    ** Mutt-ng.
600    */
601 #endif
602   {"dsn_notify", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &DsnNotify, ""},
603   /*
604    ** .pp
605    ** \fBNote:\fP you should not enable this unless you are using Sendmail
606    ** 8.8.x or greater or in connection with the SMTP support via libESMTP.
607    ** .pp
608    ** This variable sets the request for when notification is returned.  The
609    ** string consists of a comma separated list (no spaces!) of one or more
610    ** of the following: \fInever\fP, to never request notification,
611    ** \fIfailure\fP, to request notification on transmission failure,
612    ** \fIdelay\fP, to be notified of message delays, \fIsuccess\fP, to be
613    ** notified of successful transmission.
614    ** .pp
615    ** Example: \fTset dsn_notify="failure,delay"\fP
616    */
617   {"dsn_return", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &DsnReturn, ""},
618   /*
619    ** .pp
620    ** \fBNote:\fP you should not enable this unless you are using Sendmail
621    ** 8.8.x or greater or in connection with the SMTP support via libESMTP.
622    ** .pp
623    ** This variable controls how much of your message is returned in DSN
624    ** messages.  It may be set to either \fIhdrs\fP to return just the
625    ** message header, or \fIfull\fP to return the full message.
626    ** .pp
627    ** Example: \fTset dsn_return=hdrs\fP
628    */
629   {"duplicate_threads", DT_BOOL, R_RESORT|R_RESORT_INIT|R_INDEX, OPTDUPTHREADS, "yes" },
630   /*
631    ** .pp
632    ** This variable controls whether Mutt-ng, when sorting by threads, threads
633    ** messages with the same \fTMessage-ID:\fP header field together.
634    ** If it is \fIset\fP, it will indicate that it thinks they are duplicates
635    ** of each other with an equals sign in the thread diagram.
636    */
637   {"edit_headers", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTEDITHDRS, "no" },
638   /*
639    ** .pp
640    ** This option allows you to edit the header of your outgoing messages
641    ** along with the body of your message.
642    **
643    ** .pp
644    ** Which empty header fields to show is controlled by the
645    ** $$editor_headers option.
646    */
647 #ifdef USE_NNTP
648   {"editor_headers", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &EditorHeaders, "From: To: Cc: Bcc: Subject: Reply-To: Newsgroups: Followup-To: X-Comment-To:" },
649 #else
650   {"editor_headers", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &EditorHeaders, "From: To: Cc: Bcc: Subject: Reply-To:" },
651 #endif
652   /*
653    ** .pp
654    ** If $$edit_headers is \fIset\fP, this space-separated list specifies
655    ** which \fInon-empty\fP header fields to edit in addition to
656    ** user-defined headers.
657    **
658    ** .pp
659    ** Note: if $$edit_headers had to be turned on by force because
660    ** $$strict_mailto is \fIunset\fP, this option has no effect.
661    */
662   {"editor", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Editor, "" },
663   /*
664    ** .pp
665    ** This variable specifies which editor is used by Mutt-ng.
666    ** It defaults to the value of the \fT$$$VISUAL\fP, or \fT$$$EDITOR\fP, environment
667    ** variable, or to the string "\fTvi\fP" if neither of those are set.
668    */
669   {"encode_from", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTENCODEFROM, "no" },
670   /*
671    ** .pp
672    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will \fTquoted-printable\fP encode messages when
673    ** they contain the string ``\fTFrom \fP'' (note the trailing space)
674    ** in the beginning of a line. Useful to avoid the tampering certain mail
675    ** delivery and transport agents tend to do with messages.
676    **
677    ** .pp
678    ** \fBNote:\fP as Mutt-ng currently violates RfC3676 defining
679    ** \fTformat=flowed\fP, it's <em/strongly/ advised to \fIset\fP
680    ** this option although discouraged by the standard. Alternatively,
681    ** you must take care of space-stuffing <tt/From / lines (with a trailing
682    ** space) yourself.
683    */
684   {"envelope_from", DT_SYN, R_NONE, UL "use_envelope_from", 0 },
685   {"use_envelope_from", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTENVFROM, "no" },
686   /*
687    ** .pp
688    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will use ``$$envelope_from_address'' as the
689    ** \fIenvelope\fP sender if that is set, otherwise it will attempt to
690    ** derive it from the "From:" header.
691    **
692    ** .pp
693    ** \fBNote:\fP This information is passed
694    ** to sendmail command using the "-f" command line switch and
695    ** passed to the SMTP server for libESMTP (if support is compiled in).
696    */
697   {"envelope_from_address", DT_ADDR, R_NONE, UL &EnvFrom, "" },
698   /*
699   ** .pp
700   ** Manually sets the \fIenvelope\fP sender for outgoing messages.
701   ** This value is ignored if ``$$use_envelope_from'' is unset.
702   */
703   {"escape", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &EscChar, "~"},
704   /*
705    ** .pp
706    ** Escape character to use for functions in the builtin editor.
707    */
708   {"fast_reply", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTFASTREPLY, "no" },
709   /*
710    ** .pp
711    ** When \fIset\fP, the initial prompt for recipients and subject are skipped
712    ** when replying to messages, and the initial prompt for subject is
713    ** skipped when forwarding messages.
714    ** .pp
715    ** \fBNote:\fP this variable has no effect when the ``$$autoedit''
716    ** variable is \fIset\fP.
717    */
718   {"fcc_attach", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTFCCATTACH, "yes" },
719   /*
720    ** .pp
721    ** This variable controls whether or not attachments on outgoing messages
722    ** are saved along with the main body of your message.
723    */
724   {"fcc_clear", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTFCCCLEAR, "no" },
725   /*
726    ** .pp
727    ** When this variable is \fIset\fP, FCCs will be stored unencrypted and
728    ** unsigned, even when the actual message is encrypted and/or
729    ** signed.
730    ** (PGP only)
731    */
732   {"file_charset", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &FileCharset, "" },
733   /*
734    ** .pp
735    ** This variable is a colon-separated list of character encoding
736    ** schemes for text file attatchments.
737    ** If \fIunset\fP, $$charset value will be used instead.
738    ** For example, the following configuration would work for Japanese
739    ** text handling:
740    ** .pp
741    ** \fTset file_charset="iso-2022-jp:euc-jp:shift_jis:utf-8"\fP
742    ** .pp
743    ** Note: ``\fTiso-2022-*\fP'' must be put at the head of the value as shown above
744    ** if included.
745    */
746   {"folder", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Maildir, "~/Mail"},
747   /*
748    ** .pp
749    ** Specifies the default location of your mailboxes.  A ``\fT+\fP'' or ``\fT=\fP'' at the
750    ** beginning of a pathname will be expanded to the value of this
751    ** variable.  Note that if you change this variable from the default
752    ** value you need to make sure that the assignment occurs \fIbefore\fP
753    ** you use ``+'' or ``='' for any other variables since expansion takes place
754    ** during the ``set'' command.
755    */
756   {"folder_format", DT_STR, R_INDEX, UL &FolderFormat, "%2C %t %N %F %2l %-8.8u %-8.8g %8s %d %f"},
757   /*
758    ** .pp
759    ** This variable allows you to customize the file browser display to your
760    ** personal taste.  This string is similar to ``$$index_format'', but has
761    ** its own set of \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences:
762    ** .pp
763    ** .dl
764    ** .dt %C  .dd current file number
765    ** .dt %d  .dd date/time folder was last modified
766    ** .dt %f  .dd filename
767    ** .dt %F  .dd file permissions
768    ** .dt %g  .dd group name (or numeric gid, if missing)
769    ** .dt %l  .dd number of hard links
770    ** .dt %N  .dd N if folder has new mail, blank otherwise
771    ** .dt %s  .dd size in bytes
772    ** .dt %t  .dd * if the file is tagged, blank otherwise
773    ** .dt %u  .dd owner name (or numeric uid, if missing)
774    ** .dt %>X .dd right justify the rest of the string and pad with character "X"
775    ** .dt %|X .dd pad to the end of the line with character "X"
776    ** .de
777    */
778   {"followup_to", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTFOLLOWUPTO, "yes" },
779   /*
780    ** .pp
781    ** Controls whether or not the \fTMail-Followup-To:\fP header field is
782    ** generated when sending mail.  When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will generate this
783    ** field when you are replying to a known mailing list, specified with
784    ** the ``subscribe'' or ``$lists'' commands or detected by common mailing list
785    ** headers.
786    ** .pp
787    ** This field has two purposes.  First, preventing you from
788    ** receiving duplicate copies of replies to messages which you send
789    ** to mailing lists. Second, ensuring that you do get a reply
790    ** separately for any messages sent to known lists to which you are
791    ** not subscribed.  The header will contain only the list's address
792    ** for subscribed lists, and both the list address and your own
793    ** email address for unsubscribed lists.  Without this header, a
794    ** group reply to your message sent to a subscribed list will be
795    ** sent to both the list and your address, resulting in two copies
796    ** of the same email for you.
797    */
798 #ifdef USE_NNTP
799   {"nntp_followup_to_poster", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_FOLLOWUPTOPOSTER, "ask-yes" },
800   /*
801    ** .pp
802    ** Availability: NNTP
803    **
804    ** .pp
805    ** If this variable is \fIset\fP and the keyword "\fTposter\fP" is present in
806    ** the \fTFollowup-To:\fP header field, a follow-up to the newsgroup is not
807    ** permitted.  The message will be mailed to the submitter of the
808    ** message via mail.
809    */
810 #endif
811   {"force_name", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTFORCENAME, "no" },
812   /*
813    ** .pp
814    ** This variable is similar to ``$$save_name'', except that Mutt-ng will
815    ** store a copy of your outgoing message by the username of the address
816    ** you are sending to even if that mailbox does not exist.
817    ** .pp
818    ** Also see the ``$$record'' variable.
819    */
820   {"force_buffy_check", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTFORCEBUFFYCHECK, "no" },
821   /*
822    ** .pp
823    ** When \fIset\fP, it causes Mutt-ng to check for new mail when the
824    ** \fIbuffy-list\fP command is invoked. When \fIunset\fP, \fIbuffy_list\fP
825    ** will just list all mailboxes which are already known to have new mail.
826    ** .pp
827    ** Also see the following variables: ``$$timeout'', ``$$mail_check'' and
828    ** ``$$imap_mail_check''.
829    */
830   {"forward_decode", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTFORWDECODE, "yes" },
831   /*
832    ** .pp
833    ** Controls the decoding of complex MIME messages into \fTtext/plain\fP when
834    ** forwarding a message.  The message header is also RFC2047 decoded.
835    ** This variable is only used, if ``$$mime_forward'' is \fIunset\fP,
836    ** otherwise ``$$mime_forward_decode'' is used instead.
837    */
838   {"forward_edit", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_FORWEDIT, "yes" },
839   /*
840    ** .pp
841    ** This quadoption controls whether or not the user is automatically
842    ** placed in the editor when forwarding messages.  For those who always want
843    ** to forward with no modification, use a setting of \fIno\fP.
844    */
845   {"forward_format", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &ForwFmt, "[%a: %s]"},
846   /*
847    ** .pp
848    ** This variable controls the default subject when forwarding a message.
849    ** It uses the same format sequences as the ``$$index_format'' variable.
850    */
851   {"forward_quote", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTFORWQUOTE, "no" },
852   /*
853    ** .pp
854    ** When \fIset\fP forwarded messages included in the main body of the
855    ** message (when ``$$mime_forward'' is \fIunset\fP) will be quoted using
856    ** ``$$indent_string''.
857    */
858   {"from", DT_ADDR, R_NONE, UL &From, "" },
859   /*
860    ** .pp
861    ** This variable contains a default from address.  It
862    ** can be overridden using my_hdr (including from send-hooks) and
863    ** ``$$reverse_name''.  This variable is ignored if ``$$use_from''
864    ** is unset.
865    ** .pp
866    ** E.g. you can use 
867    ** \fTsend-hook Mutt-ng-devel@lists.berlios.de 'my_hdr From: Foo Bar <foo@bar.fb>'\fP
868    ** when replying to the Mutt-ng developer's mailing list and Mutt-ng takes this email address.
869    ** .pp
870    ** Defaults to the contents of the environment variable \fT$$$EMAIL\fP.
871    */
872   {"gecos_mask", DT_RX, R_NONE, UL &GecosMask, "^[^,]*"},
873   /*
874    ** .pp
875    ** A regular expression used by Mutt-ng to parse the GECOS field of a password
876    ** entry when expanding the alias.  By default the regular expression is set
877    ** to ``\fT^[^,]*\fP'' which will return the string up to the first ``\fT,\fP'' encountered.
878    ** If the GECOS field contains a string like "lastname, firstname" then you
879    ** should do: \fTset gecos_mask=".*"\fP.
880    ** .pp
881    ** This can be useful if you see the following behavior: you address a e-mail
882    ** to user ID stevef whose full name is Steve Franklin.  If Mutt-ng expands 
883    ** stevef to ``Franklin'' stevef@foo.bar then you should set the gecos_mask to
884    ** a regular expression that will match the whole name so Mutt-ng will expand
885    ** ``Franklin'' to ``Franklin, Steve''.
886    */
887 #ifdef USE_NNTP
888   {"nntp_group_index_format", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &GroupFormat, "%4C %M%N %5s  %-45.45f %d"},
889   /*
890    ** .pp
891    ** Availability: NNTP
892    **
893    ** .pp
894    ** This variable allows you to customize the newsgroup browser display to
895    ** your personal taste.  This string is similar to ``$index_format'', but
896    ** has its own set of \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences:
897    ** .pp
898    ** .ts
899    ** %C      current newsgroup number
900    ** %d      description of newsgroup (retrieved from server)
901    ** %f      newsgroup name
902    ** %M      ``-'' if newsgroup not allowed for direct post (moderated for example)
903    ** %N      ``N'' if newsgroup is new, ``u'' if unsubscribed, blank otherwise
904    ** %n      number of new articles in newsgroup
905    ** %s      number of unread articles in newsgroup
906    ** %>X     right justify the rest of the string and pad with character "X"
907    ** %|X     pad to the end of the line with character "X"
908    ** .te
909    */
910 #endif
911   {"hdrs", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTHDRS, "yes" },
912   /*
913    ** .pp
914    ** When \fIunset\fP, the header fields normally added by the ``$my_hdr''
915    ** command are not created.  This variable \fImust\fP be \fIunset\fP before
916    ** composing a new message or replying in order to take effect.  If \fIset\fP,
917    ** the user defined header fields are added to every new message.
918    */
919   {"header", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTHEADER, "no" },
920   /*
921    ** .pp
922    ** When \fIset\fP, this variable causes Mutt-ng to include the header
923    ** of the message you are replying to into the edit buffer.
924    ** The ``$$weed'' setting applies.
925    */
926   {"help", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTHELP, "yes" },
927   /*
928    ** .pp
929    ** When \fIset\fP, help lines describing the bindings for the major functions
930    ** provided by each menu are displayed on the first line of the screen.
931    ** .pp
932    ** \fBNote:\fP The binding will not be displayed correctly if the
933    ** function is bound to a sequence rather than a single keystroke.  Also,
934    ** the help line may not be updated if a binding is changed while Mutt-ng is
935    ** running.  Since this variable is primarily aimed at new users, neither
936    ** of these should present a major problem.
937    */
938   {"hidden_host", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTHIDDENHOST, "no" },
939   /*
940    ** .pp
941    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will skip the host name part of ``$$hostname'' variable
942    ** when adding the domain part to addresses.  This variable does not
943    ** affect the generation of \fTMessage-ID:\fP header fields, and it will not lead to the 
944    ** cut-off of first-level domains.
945    */
946   {"hide_limited", DT_BOOL, R_TREE|R_INDEX, OPTHIDELIMITED, "no" },
947   /*
948    ** .pp
949    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will not show the presence of messages that are hidden
950    ** by limiting, in the thread tree.
951    */
952   {"hide_missing", DT_BOOL, R_TREE|R_INDEX, OPTHIDEMISSING, "yes" },
953   /*
954    ** .pp
955    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will not show the presence of missing messages in the
956    ** thread tree.
957    */
958   {"hide_thread_subject", DT_BOOL, R_TREE|R_INDEX, OPTHIDETHREADSUBJECT, "yes" },
959   /*
960    ** .pp
961    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will not show the subject of messages in the thread
962    ** tree that have the same subject as their parent or closest previously
963    ** displayed sibling.
964    */
965   {"hide_top_limited", DT_BOOL, R_TREE|R_INDEX, OPTHIDETOPLIMITED, "no" },
966   /*
967    ** .pp
968    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will not show the presence of messages that are hidden
969    ** by limiting, at the top of threads in the thread tree.  Note that when
970    ** $$hide_missing is \fIset\fP, this option will have no effect.
971    */
972   {"hide_top_missing", DT_BOOL, R_TREE|R_INDEX, OPTHIDETOPMISSING, "yes" },
973   /*
974    ** .pp
975    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will not show the presence of missing messages at the
976    ** top of threads in the thread tree.  Note that when $$hide_limited is
977    ** \fIset\fP, this option will have no effect.
978    */
979   {"history", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &HistSize, "10" },
980   /*
981    ** .pp
982    ** This variable controls the size (in number of strings remembered) of
983    ** the string history buffer. The buffer is cleared each time the
984    ** variable is changed.
985    */
986   {"honor_followup_to", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_MFUPTO, "yes" },
987   /*
988    ** .pp
989    ** This variable controls whether or not a \fTMail-Followup-To:\fP header field is
990    ** honored when group-replying to a message.
991    */
992   {"hostname", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &Fqdn, "" },
993   /*
994    ** .pp
995    ** Specifies the hostname to use after the ``\fT@\fP'' in local e-mail
996    ** addresses and during generation of \fTMessage-ID:\fP headers.
997    ** .pp
998    ** Please be sure to really know what you are doing when changing this variable
999    ** to configure a custom domain part of Message-IDs.
1000    */
1001   {"ignore_list_reply_to", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTIGNORELISTREPLYTO, "no" },
1002   /*
1003    ** .pp
1004    ** Affects the behaviour of the \fIreply\fP function when replying to
1005    ** messages from mailing lists.  When \fIset\fP, if the ``\fTReply-To:\fP'' header field is
1006    ** set to the same value as the ``\fTTo:\fP'' header field, Mutt-ng assumes that the
1007    ** ``\fTReply-To:\fP'' header field was set by the mailing list to automate responses
1008    ** to the list, and will ignore this field.  To direct a response to the
1009    ** mailing list when this option is set, use the \fIlist-reply\fP
1010    ** function; \fIgroup-reply\fP will reply to both the sender and the
1011    ** list.
1012    ** Remember: This option works only for mailing lists which are explicitly set in your muttngrc
1013    ** configuration file.
1014    */
1015 #ifdef USE_IMAP
1016   {"imap_authenticators", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &ImapAuthenticators, "" },
1017   /*
1018    ** .pp
1019    ** Availability: IMAP
1020    **
1021    ** .pp
1022    ** This is a colon-delimited list of authentication methods Mutt-ng may
1023    ** attempt to use to log in to an IMAP server, in the order Mutt-ng should
1024    ** try them.  Authentication methods are either ``\fTlogin\fP'' or the right
1025    ** side of an IMAP ``\fTAUTH=\fP'' capability string, e.g. ``\fTdigest-md5\fP'',
1026    ** ``\fTgssapi\fP'' or ``\fTcram-md5\fP''. This parameter is case-insensitive.
1027    ** .pp
1028    ** If this
1029    ** parameter is \fIunset\fP (the default) Mutt-ng will try all available methods,
1030    ** in order from most-secure to least-secure.
1031    ** .pp
1032    ** Example: \fTset imap_authenticators="gssapi:cram-md5:login"\fP
1033    ** .pp
1034    ** \fBNote:\fP Mutt-ng will only fall back to other authentication methods if
1035    ** the previous methods are unavailable. If a method is available but
1036    ** authentication fails, Mutt-ng will not connect to the IMAP server.
1037    */
1038   { "imap_check_subscribed",  DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTIMAPCHECKSUBSCRIBED, "no" },
1039   /*
1040    ** .pp
1041    ** When \fIset\fP, mutt will fetch the set of subscribed folders from
1042    ** your server on connection, and add them to the set of mailboxes
1043    ** it polls for new mail. See also the ``$mailboxes'' command.
1044    */
1045   
1046   {"imap_delim_chars", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &ImapDelimChars, "/."},
1047   /*
1048    ** .pp
1049    ** Availability: IMAP
1050    **
1051    ** .pp
1052    ** This contains the list of characters which you would like to treat
1053    ** as folder separators for displaying IMAP paths. In particular it
1054    ** helps in using the '\fT=\fP' shortcut for your $$folder variable.
1055    */
1056   {"imap_headers", DT_STR, R_INDEX, UL &ImapHeaders, "" },
1057   /*
1058    ** .pp
1059    ** Availability: IMAP
1060    **
1061    ** .pp
1062    ** Mutt-ng requests these header fields in addition to the default headers
1063    ** (``DATE FROM SUBJECT TO CC MESSAGE-ID REFERENCES CONTENT-TYPE
1064    ** CONTENT-DESCRIPTION IN-REPLY-TO REPLY-TO LINES X-LABEL'') from IMAP
1065    ** servers before displaying the ``index'' menu. You may want to add more
1066    ** headers for spam detection.
1067    ** .pp
1068    ** \fBNote:\fP This is a space separated list.
1069    */
1070   {"imap_home_namespace", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &ImapHomeNamespace, "" },
1071   /*
1072    ** .pp
1073    ** Availability: IMAP
1074    **
1075    ** .pp
1076    ** You normally want to see your personal folders alongside
1077    ** your \fTINBOX\fP in the IMAP browser. If you see something else, you may set
1078    ** this variable to the IMAP path to your folders.
1079    */
1080   {"imap_keepalive", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &ImapKeepalive, "900" },
1081   /*
1082    ** .pp
1083    ** Availability: IMAP
1084    **
1085    ** .pp
1086    ** This variable specifies the maximum amount of time in seconds that Mutt-ng
1087    ** will wait before polling open IMAP connections, to prevent the server
1088    ** from closing them before Mutt-ng has finished with them.
1089    ** .pp
1090    ** The default is
1091    ** well within the RFC-specified minimum amount of time (30 minutes) before
1092    ** a server is allowed to do this, but in practice the RFC does get
1093    ** violated every now and then.
1094    ** .pp
1095    ** Reduce this number if you find yourself
1096    ** getting disconnected from your IMAP server due to inactivity.
1097    */
1098   {"imap_login", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &ImapLogin, "" },
1099   /*
1100    ** .pp
1101    ** Availability: IMAP
1102    **
1103    ** .pp
1104    ** Your login name on the IMAP server.
1105    ** .pp
1106    ** This variable defaults to the value of ``$$imap_user.''
1107    */
1108   {"imap_list_subscribed", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTIMAPLSUB, "no" },
1109   /*
1110    ** .pp
1111    ** Availability: IMAP
1112    **
1113    ** .pp
1114    ** This variable configures whether IMAP folder browsing will look for
1115    ** only subscribed folders or all folders.  This can be toggled in the
1116    ** IMAP browser with the \fItoggle-subscribed\fP function.
1117    */
1118   {"imap_mail_check", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &ImapBuffyTimeout, "300" },
1119   /*
1120    ** .pp
1121    ** This variable configures how often (in seconds) Mutt-ng should look for
1122    ** new mail in IMAP folders. This is split from the ``$mail_check'' variable
1123    ** to generate less traffic and get more accurate information for local folders.
1124    */
1125   {"imap_pass", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &ImapPass, "" },
1126   /*
1127    ** .pp
1128    ** Availability: IMAP
1129    **
1130    ** .pp
1131    ** Specifies the password for your IMAP account.  If \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will
1132    ** prompt you for your password when you invoke the fetch-mail function.
1133    ** .pp
1134    ** \fBWarning\fP: you should only use this option when you are on a
1135    ** fairly secure machine, because the superuser can read your configuration even
1136    ** if you are the only one who can read the file.
1137    */
1138   {"imap_passive", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTIMAPPASSIVE, "yes" },
1139   /*
1140    ** .pp
1141    ** Availability: IMAP
1142    **
1143    ** .pp
1144    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will not open new IMAP connections to check for new
1145    ** mail.  Mutt-ng will only check for new mail over existing IMAP
1146    ** connections.  This is useful if you don't want to be prompted to
1147    ** user/password pairs on Mutt-ng invocation, or if opening the connection
1148    ** is slow.
1149    */
1150   {"imap_peek", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTIMAPPEEK, "yes" },
1151   /*
1152    ** .pp
1153    ** Availability: IMAP
1154    **
1155    ** .pp
1156    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will avoid implicitly marking your mail as read whenever
1157    ** you fetch a message from the server. This is generally a good thing,
1158    ** but can make closing an IMAP folder somewhat slower. This option
1159    ** exists to appease speed freaks.
1160    */
1161   {"imap_reconnect", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_IMAPRECONNECT, "ask-yes" },
1162   /*
1163    ** .pp
1164    ** Availability: IMAP
1165    **
1166    ** .pp
1167    ** Controls whether or not Mutt-ng will try to reconnect to IMAP server when
1168    ** the connection is lost.
1169    */
1170   {"imap_servernoise", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTIMAPSERVERNOISE, "yes" },
1171   /*
1172    ** .pp
1173    ** Availability: IMAP
1174    **
1175    ** .pp
1176    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will display warning messages from the IMAP
1177    ** server as error messages. Since these messages are often
1178    ** harmless, or generated due to configuration problems on the
1179    ** server which are out of the users' hands, you may wish to suppress
1180    ** them at some point.
1181    */
1182   {"imap_user", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &ImapUser, "" },
1183   /*
1184    ** .pp
1185    ** Availability: IMAP
1186    **
1187    ** .pp
1188    ** The name of the user whose mail you intend to access on the IMAP
1189    ** server.
1190    ** .pp
1191    ** This variable defaults to your user name on the local machine.
1192    */
1193 #endif
1194   {"implicit_autoview", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTIMPLICITAUTOVIEW, "no" },
1195   /*
1196    ** .pp
1197    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will look for a mailcap entry with the
1198    ** ``\fTcopiousoutput\fP'' flag set for \fIevery\fP MIME attachment it doesn't have
1199    ** an internal viewer defined for.  If such an entry is found, Mutt-ng will
1200    ** use the viewer defined in that entry to convert the body part to text
1201    ** form.
1202    */
1203   {"include", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_INCLUDE, "ask-yes" },
1204   /*
1205    ** .pp
1206    ** Controls whether or not a copy of the message(s) you are replying to
1207    ** is included in your reply.
1208    */
1209   {"include_onlyfirst", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTINCLUDEONLYFIRST, "no" },
1210   /*
1211    ** .pp
1212    ** Controls whether or not Mutt-ng includes only the first attachment
1213    ** of the message you are replying.
1214    */
1215   {"indent_string", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &Prefix, "> "},
1216   /*
1217    ** .pp
1218    ** Specifies the string to prepend to each line of text quoted in a
1219    ** message to which you are replying.  You are strongly encouraged not to
1220    ** change this value, as it tends to agitate the more fanatical netizens.
1221    */
1222   {"index_format", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &HdrFmt, "%4C %Z %{%b %d} %-15.15L (%?l?%4l&%4c?) %s"},
1223   /*
1224    ** .pp
1225    ** This variable allows you to customize the message index display to
1226    ** your personal taste.
1227    ** .pp
1228    ** ``Format strings'' are similar to the strings used in the ``C''
1229    ** function \fTprintf(3)\fP to format output (see the man page for more detail).
1230    ** The following sequences are defined in Mutt-ng:
1231    ** .pp
1232    ** .dl
1233    ** .dt %a .dd address of the author
1234    ** .dt %A .dd reply-to address (if present; otherwise: address of author)
1235    ** .dt %b .dd filename of the original message folder (think mailBox)
1236    ** .dt %B .dd the list to which the letter was sent, or else the folder name (%b).
1237    ** .dt %c .dd number of characters (bytes) in the message
1238    ** .dt %C .dd current message number
1239    ** .dt %d .dd date and time of the message in the format specified by
1240    **            ``date_format'' converted to sender's time zone
1241    ** .dt %D .dd date and time of the message in the format specified by
1242    **            ``date_format'' converted to the local time zone
1243    ** .dt %e .dd current message number in thread
1244    ** .dt %E .dd number of messages in current thread
1245    ** .dt %f .dd entire From: line (address + real name)
1246    ** .dt %F .dd author name, or recipient name if the message is from you
1247    ** .dt %H .dd spam attribute(s) of this message
1248    ** .dt %g .dd newsgroup name (if compiled with nntp support)
1249    ** .dt %i .dd message-id of the current message
1250    ** .dt %l .dd number of lines in the message (does not work with maildir,
1251    **            mh, and possibly IMAP folders)
1252    ** .dt %L .dd If an address in the To or CC header field matches an address
1253    **            defined by the users ``subscribe'' command, this displays
1254    **            "To <list-name>", otherwise the same as %F.
1255    ** .dt %m .dd total number of message in the mailbox
1256    ** .dt %M .dd number of hidden messages if the thread is collapsed.
1257    ** .dt %N .dd message score
1258    ** .dt %n .dd author's real name (or address if missing)
1259    ** .dt %O .dd (_O_riginal save folder)  Where Mutt-ng would formerly have
1260    **            stashed the message: list name or recipient name if no list
1261    ** .dt %s .dd subject of the message
1262    ** .dt %S .dd status of the message (N/D/d/!/r/\(as)
1263    ** .dt %t .dd `to:' field (recipients)
1264    ** .dt %T .dd the appropriate character from the $$to_chars string
1265    ** .dt %u .dd user (login) name of the author
1266    ** .dt %v .dd first name of the author, or the recipient if the message is from you
1267    ** .dt %W .dd name of organization of author (`organization:' field)
1268    ** .dt %X .dd number of attachments
1269    ** .dt %y .dd `x-label:' field, if present
1270    ** .dt %Y .dd `x-label' field, if present, and (1) not at part of a thread tree,
1271    **            (2) at the top of a thread, or (3) `x-label' is different from
1272    **            preceding message's `x-label'.
1273    ** .dt %Z .dd message status flags
1274    ** .dt %{fmt} .dd the date and time of the message is converted to sender's
1275    **                time zone, and ``fmt'' is expanded by the library function
1276    **                ``strftime''; a leading bang disables locales
1277    ** .dt %[fmt] .dd the date and time of the message is converted to the local
1278    **                time zone, and ``fmt'' is expanded by the library function
1279    **                ``strftime''; a leading bang disables locales
1280    ** .dt %(fmt) .dd the local date and time when the message was received.
1281    **                ``fmt'' is expanded by the library function ``strftime'';
1282    **                a leading bang disables locales
1283    ** .dt %<fmt> .dd the current local time. ``fmt'' is expanded by the library
1284    **                function ``strftime''; a leading bang disables locales.
1285    ** .dt %>X    .dd right justify the rest of the string and pad with character "X"
1286    ** .dt %|X    .dd pad to the end of the line with character "X"
1287    ** .de
1288    ** .pp
1289    ** See also: ``$$to_chars''.
1290    */
1291 #ifdef USE_NNTP
1292   {"nntp_inews", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Inews, ""},
1293   /*
1294    ** .pp
1295    ** Availability: NNTP
1296    **
1297    ** .pp
1298    ** If \fIset\fP, specifies the program and arguments used to deliver news posted
1299    ** by Mutt-ng.  Otherwise, Mutt-ng posts article using current connection.
1300    ** The following \fTprintf(3)\fP-style sequence is understood:
1301    ** .pp
1302    ** .ts
1303    ** %s      newsserver name
1304    ** .te
1305    ** .pp
1306    ** Example: \fTset inews="/usr/local/bin/inews -hS"\fP
1307    */
1308 #endif
1309   {"ispell", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Ispell, ISPELL},
1310   /*
1311    ** .pp
1312    ** How to invoke ispell (GNU's spell-checking software).
1313    */
1314   {"keep_flagged", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTKEEPFLAGGED, "no" },
1315   /*
1316    ** .pp
1317    ** If \fIset\fP, read messages marked as flagged will not be moved
1318    ** from your spool mailbox to your ``$$mbox'' mailbox, or as a result of
1319    ** a ``$mbox-hook'' command.
1320    */
1321   {"locale", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &Locale, "C"},
1322   /*
1323    ** .pp
1324    ** The locale used by \fTstrftime(3)\fP to format dates. Legal values are
1325    ** the strings your system accepts for the locale variable \fTLC_TIME\fP.
1326    */
1327   {"force_list_reply", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_LISTREPLY, "ask-no" },
1328   /*
1329    ** .pp
1330    ** This variable controls what effect ordinary replies have on mailing list
1331    ** messages: if \fIset\fP, a normal reply will be interpreted as list-reply
1332    ** while if it's \fIunset\fP the reply functions work as usual.
1333    */
1334   {"max_display_recips", DT_NUM, R_PAGER, UL &MaxDispRecips, "0" },
1335   /*
1336    ** .pp
1337    ** When set non-zero, this specifies the maximum number of recipient header
1338    ** lines (\fTTo:\fP, \fTCc:\fP and \fTBcc:\fP) to display in the pager if header
1339    ** weeding is turned on. In case the number of lines exeeds its value, the
1340    ** last line will have 3 dots appended.
1341    */
1342   {"max_line_length", DT_NUM, R_PAGER, UL &MaxLineLength, "0" },
1343   /*
1344    ** .pp
1345    ** When \fIset\fP, the maximum line length for displaying ``format = flowed'' messages is limited
1346    ** to this length. A value of 0 (which is also the default) means that the
1347    ** maximum line length is determined by the terminal width and $$wrapmargin.
1348    */
1349   {"mail_check", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &BuffyTimeout, "5" },
1350   /*
1351    ** .pp
1352    ** This variable configures how often (in seconds) Mutt-ng should look for
1353    ** new mail.
1354    ** .pp
1355    ** \fBNote:\fP This does not apply to IMAP mailboxes, see $$imap_mail_check.
1356    */
1357   {"mailcap_path", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &MailcapPath, "" },
1358   /*
1359    ** .pp
1360    ** This variable specifies which files to consult when attempting to
1361    ** display MIME bodies not directly supported by Mutt-ng.
1362    */
1363   {"mailcap_sanitize", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTMAILCAPSANITIZE, "yes" },
1364   /*
1365    ** .pp
1366    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will restrict possible characters in mailcap \fT%\fP expandos
1367    ** to a well-defined set of safe characters.  This is the safe setting,
1368    ** but we are not sure it doesn't break some more advanced MIME stuff.
1369    ** .pp
1370    ** \fBDON'T CHANGE THIS SETTING UNLESS YOU ARE REALLY SURE WHAT YOU ARE
1371    ** DOING!\fP
1372    */
1373 #ifdef USE_HCACHE
1374
1375   {"header_cache", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &HeaderCache, "" },
1376   /*
1377    ** .pp
1378    ** Availability: Header Cache
1379    **
1380    ** .pp
1381    ** The $$header_cache variable points to the header cache database.
1382    ** .pp
1383    ** If $$header_cache points to a directory it will contain a header cache
1384    ** database  per folder. If $$header_cache points to a file that file will
1385    ** be a single global header cache. By default it is \fIunset\fP so no
1386    ** header caching will be used.
1387    */
1388   {"maildir_header_cache_verify", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTHCACHEVERIFY, "yes" },
1389   /*
1390    ** .pp
1391    ** Availability: Header Cache
1392    **
1393    ** .pp
1394    ** Check for Maildir unaware programs other than Mutt-ng having modified maildir
1395    ** files when the header cache is in use. This incurs one \fTstat(2)\fP per
1396    ** message every time the folder is opened.
1397    */
1398 #if HAVE_GDBM || HAVE_DB4
1399   {"header_cache_pagesize", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &HeaderCachePageSize, "16384"},
1400   /*
1401    ** .pp
1402    ** Availability: Header Cache
1403    **
1404    ** .pp
1405    ** Change the maildir header cache database page size.
1406    ** .pp
1407    ** Too large
1408    ** or too small of a page size for the common header can waste
1409    ** space, memory effectiveness, or CPU time. The default should be more or
1410    ** less the best you can get. For details google for mutt header
1411    ** cache (first hit).
1412    */
1413 #endif /* HAVE_GDBM || HAVE_DB 4 */
1414 #if HAVE_QDBM
1415   { "header_cache_compress", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTHCACHECOMPRESS, "no" },
1416   /*
1417   ** .pp
1418   ** If enabled the header cache will be compressed. So only one fifth of the usual
1419   ** diskspace is used, but the uncompression can result in a slower open of the
1420   ** cached folder.
1421   */
1422 #endif /* HAVE_QDBM */
1423 #endif /* USE_HCACHE */
1424   {"maildir_trash", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTMAILDIRTRASH, "no" },
1425   /*
1426    ** .pp
1427    ** If \fIset\fP, messages marked as deleted will be saved with the maildir
1428    ** (T)rashed flag instead of physically deleted.
1429    ** .pp
1430    ** \fBNOTE:\fP this only applies
1431    ** to maildir-style mailboxes. Setting it will have no effect on other
1432    ** mailbox types.
1433    ** .pp
1434    ** It is similiar to the trash option.
1435    */
1436   {"mark_old", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTMARKOLD, "yes" },
1437   /*
1438    ** .pp
1439    ** Controls whether or not Mutt-ng marks \fInew\fP \fBunread\fP
1440    ** messages as \fIold\fP if you exit a mailbox without reading them.
1441    ** .pp
1442    ** With this option \fIset\fP, the next time you start Mutt-ng, the messages
1443    ** will show up with an "O" next to them in the ``index'' menu,
1444    ** indicating that they are old.
1445    */
1446   {"markers", DT_BOOL, R_PAGER, OPTMARKERS, "yes" },
1447   /*
1448    ** .pp
1449    ** Controls the display of wrapped lines in the internal pager. If set, a
1450    ** ``\fT+\fP'' marker is displayed at the beginning of wrapped lines. Also see
1451    ** the ``$$smart_wrap'' variable.
1452    */
1453   {"mask", DT_RX, R_NONE, UL &Mask, "!^\\.[^.]"},
1454   /*
1455    ** .pp
1456    ** A regular expression used in the file browser, optionally preceded by
1457    ** the \fInot\fP operator ``\fT!\fP''.  Only files whose names match this mask
1458    ** will be shown. The match is always case-sensitive.
1459    */
1460   {"mbox", DT_PATH, R_BOTH, UL &Inbox, "~/mbox"},
1461   /*
1462    ** .pp
1463    ** This specifies the folder into which read mail in your ``$$spoolfile''
1464    ** folder will be appended.
1465    */
1466   {"muttng_version", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, VERSION },
1467   /*
1468    ** .pp
1469    ** \fIThis is a read-only system property and specifies muttng's
1470    ** version string.\fP
1471    */
1472   {"muttng_revision", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, MUTT_REVISION },
1473   /*
1474    ** .pp
1475    ** \fIThis is a read-only system property and specifies muttng's
1476    ** subversion revision string.\fP
1477    */
1478   {"muttng_sysconfdir", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, SYSCONFDIR },
1479   /*
1480    ** .pp
1481    ** \fIThis is a read-only system property and specifies the
1482    ** directory containing the muttng system-wide configuration.\fP
1483    */
1484   {"muttng_bindir", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, BINDIR },
1485   /*
1486    ** .pp
1487    ** \fIThis is a read-only system property and specifies the
1488    ** directory containing the muttng binary.\fP
1489    */
1490   {"muttng_docdir", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, PKGDOCDIR },
1491   /*
1492    ** .pp
1493    ** \fIThis is a read-only system property and specifies the
1494    ** directory containing the muttng documentation.\fP
1495    */
1496 #ifdef USE_HCACHE
1497 #if HAVE_QDBM
1498   {"muttng_hcache_backend", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, "qdbm" },
1499 #elif HAVE_GDBM
1500   {"muttng_hcache_backend", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, "gdbm" },
1501 #elif HAVE_DB4
1502   {"muttng_hcache_backend", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, "db4" },
1503 #else
1504   {"muttng_hcache_backend", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, "unknown" },
1505 #endif
1506   /*
1507    ** .pp
1508    ** \fIThis is a read-only system property and specifies the
1509    ** header chaching's database backend.\fP
1510    */
1511 #endif
1512   {"muttng_folder_path", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, "" },
1513   /*
1514    ** .pp
1515    ** \fIThis is a read-only system property and, at runtime,
1516    ** specifies the full path or URI of the folder currently
1517    ** open (if any).\fP
1518    */
1519   {"muttng_folder_name", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, "" },
1520   /*
1521    ** .pp
1522    ** \fIThis is a read-only system property and, at runtime,
1523    ** specifies the actual name of the folder as far as it could
1524    ** be detected.\fP
1525    ** .pp
1526    ** For detection, $$$folder is first taken into account
1527    ** and simply stripped to form the result when a match is found. For
1528    ** example, with $$$folder being \fTimap://host\fP and the folder is
1529    ** \fTimap://host/INBOX/foo\fP, $$$muttng_folder_name will be just
1530    ** \fTINBOX/foo\fP.)
1531    ** .pp
1532    ** Second, if the initial portion of a name is not $$$folder,
1533    ** the result will be everything after the last ``/''.
1534    ** .pp
1535    ** Third and last, the result will be just the name if neither
1536    ** $$$folder nor a ``/'' were found in the name.
1537    */
1538   {"muttng_pwd", DT_SYS, R_NONE, 0, "" },
1539   /*
1540    ** .pp
1541    ** \fIThis is a read-only system property and, at runtime,
1542    ** specifies the current working directory of the muttng
1543    ** binary.\fP
1544    */
1545   {"operating_system", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &OperatingSystem, "" },
1546   /*
1547    ** .pp
1548    ** This specifies the operating system name for the \fTUser-Agent:\fP header field. If
1549    ** this is \fIunset\fP, it will be set to the operating system name that \fTuname(2)\fP
1550    ** returns. If \fTuname(2)\fP fails, ``UNIX'' will be used.
1551    ** .pp
1552    ** It may, for example, look as: ``\fTmutt-ng 1.5.9i (Linux)\fP''.
1553    */
1554   {"sidebar_boundary", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &SidebarBoundary, "." },
1555   /*
1556    ** .pp
1557    ** When the sidebar is displayed and $$sidebar_shorten_hierarchy is \fIset\fP, this
1558    ** variable specifies the characters at which to split a folder name into
1559    ** ``hierarchy items.''
1560    */
1561   {"sidebar_delim", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &SidebarDelim, "|"},
1562   /*
1563    ** .pp
1564    ** This specifies the delimiter between the sidebar (if visible) and 
1565    ** other screens.
1566    */
1567   {"sidebar_visible", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTMBOXPANE, "no" },
1568   /*
1569    ** .pp
1570    ** This specifies whether or not to show the sidebar (a list of folders specified
1571    ** with the ``mailboxes'' command).
1572    */
1573   {"sidebar_width", DT_NUM, R_BOTH, UL &SidebarWidth, "0" },
1574   /*
1575    ** .pp
1576    ** The width of the sidebar.
1577    */
1578   {"sidebar_newmail_only", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTSIDEBARNEWMAILONLY, "no" },
1579   /*
1580    ** .pp
1581    ** If \fIset\fP, only folders with new mail will be shown in the sidebar.
1582    */
1583   {"sidebar_number_format", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &SidebarNumberFormat, "%m%?n?(%n)?%?f?[%f]?"},
1584   /*
1585    ** .pp
1586    ** This variable controls how message counts are printed when the sidebar
1587    ** is enabled. If this variable is \fIempty\fP (\fIand only if\fP), no numbers
1588    ** will be printed \fIand\fP Mutt-ng won't frequently count mail (which
1589    ** may be a great speedup esp. with mbox-style mailboxes.)
1590    ** .pp
1591    ** The following \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences are supported all of which
1592    ** may be printed non-zero:
1593    ** .pp
1594    ** .dl
1595    ** .dt %d .dd Number of deleted messages. 1)
1596    ** .dt %F .dd Number of flagged messages.
1597    ** .dt %m .dd Total number of messages.
1598    ** .dt %M .dd Total number of messages shown, i.e. not hidden by a limit. 1)
1599    ** .dt %n .dd Number of new messages.
1600    ** .dt %t .dd Number of tagged messages. 1)
1601    ** .dt %u .dd Number of unread messages.
1602    ** .de
1603    ** .pp
1604    ** 1) These expandos only have a non-zero value for the current mailbox and
1605    ** will always be zero otherwise.
1606    */
1607   {"sidebar_shorten_hierarchy", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSHORTENHIERARCHY, "no" },
1608   /*
1609    ** .pp
1610    ** When \fIset\fP, the ``hierarchy'' of the sidebar entries will be shortened
1611    ** only if they cannot be printed in full length (because ``$$sidebar_width''
1612    ** is set to a too low value). For example, if the newsgroup name 
1613    ** ``de.alt.sysadmin.recovery'' doesn't fit on the screen, it'll get shortened
1614    ** ``d.a.s.recovery'' while ``de.alt.d0'' still would and thus will not get 
1615    ** shortened.
1616    ** .pp
1617    ** At which characters this compression is done is controled via the
1618    ** $$sidebar_boundary variable.
1619    */
1620   {"mbox_type", DT_MAGIC, R_NONE, UL &DefaultMagic, "mbox" },
1621   /*
1622    ** .pp
1623    ** The default mailbox type used when creating new folders. May be any of
1624    ** \fTmbox\fP, \fTMMDF\fP, \fTMH\fP and \fTMaildir\fP.
1625    */
1626   {"metoo", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTMETOO, "no" },
1627   /*
1628    ** .pp
1629    ** If \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will remove your address (see the ``alternates''
1630    ** command) from the list of recipients when replying to a message.
1631    */
1632   {"menu_context", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &MenuContext, "0" },
1633   /*
1634    ** .pp
1635    ** This variable controls the number of lines of context that are given
1636    ** when scrolling through menus. (Similar to ``$$pager_context''.)
1637    */
1638   {"menu_move_off", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTMENUMOVEOFF, "yes" },
1639   /*
1640    ** .pp
1641    ** When \fIunset\fP, the bottom entry of menus will never scroll up past
1642    ** the bottom of the screen, unless there are less entries than lines.
1643    ** When \fIset\fP, the bottom entry may move off the bottom.
1644    */
1645   {"menu_scroll", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTMENUSCROLL, "no" },
1646   /*
1647    ** .pp
1648    ** When \fIset\fP, menus will be scrolled up or down one line when you
1649    ** attempt to move across a screen boundary.  If \fIunset\fP, the screen
1650    ** is cleared and the next or previous page of the menu is displayed
1651    ** (useful for slow links to avoid many redraws).
1652    */
1653   {"meta_key", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTMETAKEY, "no" },
1654   /*
1655    ** .pp
1656    ** If \fIset\fP, forces Mutt-ng to interpret keystrokes with the high bit (bit 8)
1657    ** set as if the user had pressed the \fTESC\fP key and whatever key remains
1658    ** after having the high bit removed.  For example, if the key pressed
1659    ** has an ASCII value of \fT0xf8\fP, then this is treated as if the user had
1660    ** pressed \fTESC\fP then ``\fTx\fP''.  This is because the result of removing the
1661    ** high bit from ``\fT0xf8\fP'' is ``\fT0x78\fP'', which is the ASCII character
1662    ** ``\fTx\fP''.
1663    */
1664   {"mh_purge", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTMHPURGE, "no" },
1665   /*
1666    ** .pp
1667    ** When \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will mimic mh's behaviour and rename deleted messages
1668    ** to \fI,<old file name>\fP in mh folders instead of really deleting
1669    ** them.  If the variable is set, the message files will simply be
1670    ** deleted.
1671    */
1672   {"mh_seq_flagged", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &MhFlagged, "flagged"},
1673   /*
1674    ** .pp
1675    ** The name of the MH sequence used for flagged messages.
1676    */
1677   {"mh_seq_replied", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &MhReplied, "replied"},
1678   /*
1679    ** .pp
1680    ** The name of the MH sequence used to tag replied messages.
1681    */
1682   {"mh_seq_unseen", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &MhUnseen, "unseen"},
1683   /*
1684    ** .pp
1685    ** The name of the MH sequence used for unseen messages.
1686    */
1687   {"mime_forward", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_MIMEFWD, "no" },
1688   /*
1689    ** .pp
1690    ** When \fIset\fP, the message you are forwarding will be attached as a
1691    ** separate MIME part instead of included in the main body of the
1692    ** message.
1693    ** .pp
1694    ** This is useful for forwarding MIME messages so the receiver
1695    ** can properly view the message as it was delivered to you. If you like
1696    ** to switch between MIME and not MIME from mail to mail, set this
1697    ** variable to ask-no or ask-yes.
1698    ** .pp
1699    ** Also see ``$$forward_decode'' and ``$$mime_forward_decode''.
1700    */
1701   {"mime_forward_decode", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTMIMEFORWDECODE, "no" },
1702   /*
1703    ** .pp
1704    ** Controls the decoding of complex MIME messages into \fTtext/plain\fP when
1705    ** forwarding a message while ``$$mime_forward'' is \fIset\fP. Otherwise
1706    ** ``$$forward_decode'' is used instead.
1707    */
1708   {"mime_forward_rest", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_MIMEFWDREST, "yes" },
1709   /*
1710    ** .pp
1711    ** When forwarding multiple attachments of a MIME message from the recvattach
1712    ** menu, attachments which cannot be decoded in a reasonable manner will
1713    ** be attached to the newly composed message if this option is set.
1714    */
1715
1716 #ifdef USE_NNTP
1717   {"nntp_mime_subject", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTMIMESUBJECT, "yes" },
1718   /*
1719    ** .pp
1720    ** Availability: NNTP
1721    **
1722    ** .pp
1723    ** If \fIunset\fP, an 8-bit ``\fTSubject:\fP'' header field in a news article
1724    ** will not be encoded according to RFC2047.
1725    ** .pp
1726    ** \fBNote:\fP Only change this setting if you know what you are doing.
1727    */
1728 #endif
1729
1730 #ifdef MIXMASTER
1731   {"mix_entry_format", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &MixEntryFormat, "%4n %c %-16s %a"},
1732   /*
1733    ** .pp
1734    ** Availability: Mixmaster
1735    **
1736    ** .pp
1737    ** This variable describes the format of a remailer line on the mixmaster
1738    ** chain selection screen.  The following \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences are 
1739    ** supported:
1740    ** .pp
1741    ** .dl
1742    ** .dt %n .dd The running number on the menu.
1743    ** .dt %c .dd Remailer capabilities.
1744    ** .dt %s .dd The remailer's short name.
1745    ** .dt %a .dd The remailer's e-mail address.
1746    ** .de
1747    */
1748   {"mixmaster", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Mixmaster, MIXMASTER},
1749   /*
1750    ** .pp
1751    ** Availability: Mixmaster
1752    **
1753    ** .pp
1754    ** This variable contains the path to the Mixmaster binary on your
1755    ** system.  It is used with various sets of parameters to gather the
1756    ** list of known remailers, and to finally send a message through the
1757    ** mixmaster chain.
1758    */
1759 #endif
1760   {"move", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_MOVE, "ask-no" },
1761   /*
1762    ** .pp
1763    ** Controls whether or not Mutt-ng will move read messages
1764    ** from your spool mailbox to your ``$$mbox'' mailbox, or as a result of
1765    ** a ``$mbox-hook'' command.
1766    */
1767   {"message_format", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &MsgFmt, "%s"},
1768   /*
1769    ** .pp
1770    ** This is the string displayed in the ``attachment'' menu for
1771    ** attachments of type \fTmessage/rfc822\fP.  For a full listing of defined
1772    ** \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences see the section on ``$$index_format''.
1773    */
1774   {"msgid_format", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &MsgIdFormat, "%Y%m%d%h%M%s.G%P%p"},
1775   /*
1776    ** .pp
1777    ** This is the format for the ``local part'' of the \fTMessage-ID:\fP header
1778    ** field generated by Mutt-ng. If this variable is empty, no \fTMessage-ID:\fP
1779    ** headers will be generated. The '%'
1780    ** character marks that certain data will be added to the string, similar to
1781    ** \fTprintf(3)\fP. The following characters are allowed:
1782    ** .pp
1783    ** .dl
1784    ** .dt %d .dd the current day of month
1785    ** .dt %h .dd the current hour
1786    ** .dt %m .dd the current month
1787    ** .dt %M .dd the current minute
1788    ** .dt %O .dd the current UNIX timestamp (octal)
1789    ** .dt %p .dd the process ID
1790    ** .dt %P .dd the current Message-ID prefix (a character rotating with 
1791    **            every Message-ID being generated)
1792    ** .dt %r .dd a random integer value (decimal)
1793    ** .dt %R .dd a random integer value (hexadecimal)
1794    ** .dt %s .dd the current second
1795    ** .dt %T .dd the current UNIX timestamp (decimal)
1796    ** .dt %X .dd the current UNIX timestamp (hexadecimal)
1797    ** .dt %Y .dd the current year (Y2K compliant)
1798    ** .dt %% .dd the '%' character
1799    ** .de
1800    ** .pp
1801    ** \fBNote:\fP Please only change this setting if you know what you are doing.
1802    ** Also make sure to consult RFC2822 to produce technically \fIvalid\fP strings.
1803    */
1804   {"narrow_tree", DT_BOOL, R_TREE|R_INDEX, OPTNARROWTREE, "no" },
1805   /*
1806    ** .pp
1807    ** This variable, when \fIset\fP, makes the thread tree narrower, allowing
1808    ** deeper threads to fit on the screen.
1809    */
1810 #ifdef USE_NNTP
1811   {"nntp_cache_dir", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &NewsCacheDir, "~/.muttng"},
1812   /*
1813    ** .pp
1814    ** Availability: NNTP
1815    **
1816    ** .pp
1817    ** This variable points to directory where Mutt-ng will cache news
1818    ** article headers. If \fIunset\fP, headers will not be saved at all
1819    ** and will be reloaded each time when you enter a newsgroup.
1820    ** .pp
1821    ** As for the header caching in connection with IMAP and/or Maildir,
1822    ** this drastically increases speed and lowers traffic.
1823    */
1824   {"nntp_host", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &NewsServer, "" },
1825   /*
1826    ** .pp
1827    ** Availability: NNTP
1828    **
1829    ** .pp
1830    ** This variable specifies the name (or address) of the NNTP server to be used.
1831    ** .pp
1832    ** It
1833    ** defaults to the value specified via the environment variable
1834    ** \fT$$$NNTPSERVER\fP or contained in the file \fT/etc/nntpserver\fP.
1835    ** .pp
1836    ** You can also
1837    ** specify a username and an alternative port for each newsserver, e.g.
1838    ** .pp
1839    ** \fT[nntp[s]://][username[:password]@]newsserver[:port]\fP
1840    ** .pp
1841    ** \fBNote:\fP Using a password as shown and stored in a configuration file
1842    ** presents a security risk since the superuser of your machine may read it
1843    ** regardless of the file's permissions.
1844    */
1845   {"nntp_newsrc", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &NewsRc, "~/.newsrc"},
1846   /*
1847    ** .pp
1848    ** Availability: NNTP
1849    **
1850    ** .pp
1851    ** This file contains information about subscribed newsgroup and
1852    ** articles read so far.
1853    ** .pp
1854    ** To ease the use of multiple news servers, the following \fTprintf(3)\fP-style
1855    ** sequence is understood:
1856    ** .pp
1857    ** .ts
1858    ** %s      newsserver name
1859    ** .te
1860    */
1861   {"nntp_context", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &NntpContext, "1000" },
1862   /*
1863    ** .pp
1864    ** Availability: NNTP
1865    **
1866    ** .pp
1867    ** This variable controls how many news articles to cache per newsgroup
1868    ** (if caching is enabled, see $$nntp_cache_dir) and how many news articles
1869    ** to show in the ``index'' menu.
1870    ** .pp
1871    ** If there're more articles than defined with $$nntp_context, all older ones
1872    ** will be removed/not shown in the index.
1873    */
1874   {"nntp_load_description", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTLOADDESC, "yes" },
1875   /*
1876    ** .pp
1877    ** Availability: NNTP
1878    **
1879    ** .pp
1880    ** This variable controls whether or not descriptions for newsgroups
1881    ** are to be loaded when subscribing to a newsgroup.
1882    */
1883   {"nntp_user", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &NntpUser, ""},
1884   /*
1885    ** .pp
1886    ** Availability: NNTP
1887    **
1888    ** .pp
1889    ** Your login name on the NNTP server.  If \fIunset\fP and the server requires
1890    ** authentification, Mutt-ng will prompt you for your account name.
1891    */
1892   {"nntp_pass", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &NntpPass, ""},
1893   /*
1894    ** .pp
1895    ** Availability: NNTP
1896    **
1897    ** .pp
1898    ** Your password for NNTP account.
1899    ** .pp
1900    ** \fBNote:\fP Storing passwords in a configuration file
1901    ** presents a security risk since the superuser of your machine may read it
1902    ** regardless of the file's permissions.
1903    */
1904   {"nntp_mail_check", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &NewsPollTimeout, "60" },
1905   /*
1906    ** .pp
1907    ** Availability: NNTP
1908    **
1909    ** .pp
1910    ** The time in seconds until any operations on a newsgroup except posting a new
1911    ** article will cause a recheck for new news. If set to 0, Mutt-ng will
1912    ** recheck on each operation in index (stepping, read article, etc.).
1913    */
1914   {"nntp_reconnect", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_NNTPRECONNECT, "ask-yes" },
1915   /*
1916    ** .pp
1917    ** Availability: NNTP
1918    **
1919    ** .pp
1920    ** Controls whether or not Mutt-ng will try to reconnect to a newsserver when the
1921    ** was connection lost.
1922    */
1923 #endif
1924   { "net_inc", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &NetInc, "10" },
1925   /*
1926   ** .pp
1927   ** Operations that expect to transfer a large amount of data over the
1928   ** network will update their progress every \fInet_inc\fP kilobytes.
1929   ** If set to 0, no progress messages will be displayed.
1930   ** .pp
1931   ** See also ``$$read_inc'' and ``$$write_inc''.
1932   */
1933   {"pager", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Pager, "builtin"},
1934   /*
1935    ** .pp
1936    ** This variable specifies which pager you would like to use to view
1937    ** messages. ``builtin'' means to use the builtin pager, otherwise this
1938    ** variable should specify the pathname of the external pager you would
1939    ** like to use.
1940    ** .pp
1941    ** Using an external pager may have some disadvantages: Additional
1942    ** keystrokes are necessary because you can't call Mutt-ng functions
1943    ** directly from the pager, and screen resizes cause lines longer than
1944    ** the screen width to be badly formatted in the help menu.
1945    */
1946   {"pager_context", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &PagerContext, "0" },
1947   /*
1948    ** .pp
1949    ** This variable controls the number of lines of context that are given
1950    ** when displaying the next or previous page in the internal pager.  By
1951    ** default, Mutt-ng will display the line after the last one on the screen
1952    ** at the top of the next page (0 lines of context).
1953    */
1954   {"pager_format", DT_STR, R_PAGER, UL &PagerFmt, "-%Z- %C/%m: %-20.20n   %s"},
1955   /*
1956    ** .pp
1957    ** This variable controls the format of the one-line message ``status''
1958    ** displayed before each message in either the internal or an external
1959    ** pager.  The valid sequences are listed in the ``$$index_format''
1960    ** section.
1961    */
1962   {"pager_index_lines", DT_NUM, R_PAGER, UL &PagerIndexLines, "0" },
1963   /*
1964    ** .pp
1965    ** Determines the number of lines of a mini-index which is shown when in
1966    ** the pager.  The current message, unless near the top or bottom of the
1967    ** folder, will be roughly one third of the way down this mini-index,
1968    ** giving the reader the context of a few messages before and after the
1969    ** message.  This is useful, for example, to determine how many messages
1970    ** remain to be read in the current thread.  One of the lines is reserved
1971    ** for the status bar from the index, so a \fIpager_index_lines\fP of 6
1972    ** will only show 5 lines of the actual index.  A value of 0 results in
1973    ** no index being shown.  If the number of messages in the current folder
1974    ** is less than \fIpager_index_lines\fP, then the index will only use as
1975    ** many lines as it needs.
1976    */
1977   {"pager_stop", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPAGERSTOP, "no" },
1978   /*
1979    ** .pp
1980    ** When \fIset\fP, the internal-pager will \fBnot\fP move to the next message
1981    ** when you are at the end of a message and invoke the \fInext-page\fP
1982    ** function.
1983    */
1984   {"crypt_autosign", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCRYPTAUTOSIGN, "no" },
1985   /*
1986    ** .pp
1987    ** Setting this variable will cause Mutt-ng to always attempt to
1988    ** cryptographically sign outgoing messages.  This can be overridden
1989    ** by use of the \fIpgp-menu\fP, when signing is not required or
1990    ** encryption is requested as well. If ``$$smime_is_default'' is \fIset\fP,
1991    ** then OpenSSL is used instead to create S/MIME messages and settings can
1992    ** be overridden by use of the \fIsmime-menu\fP.
1993    ** (Crypto only)
1994    */
1995   {"crypt_autoencrypt", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCRYPTAUTOENCRYPT, "no" },
1996   /*
1997    ** .pp
1998    ** Setting this variable will cause Mutt-ng to always attempt to PGP
1999    ** encrypt outgoing messages.  This is probably only useful in
2000    ** connection to the \fIsend-hook\fP command.  It can be overridden
2001    ** by use of the \fIpgp-menu\fP, when encryption is not required or
2002    ** signing is requested as well.  If ``$$smime_is_default'' is \fIset\fP,
2003    ** then OpenSSL is used instead to create S/MIME messages and
2004    ** settings can be overridden by use of the \fIsmime-menu\fP.
2005    ** (Crypto only)
2006    */
2007   {"pgp_ignore_subkeys", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPGPIGNORESUB, "yes" },
2008   /*
2009    ** .pp
2010    ** Setting this variable will cause Mutt-ng to ignore OpenPGP subkeys. Instead,
2011    ** the principal key will inherit the subkeys' capabilities. \fIUnset\fP this
2012    ** if you want to play interesting key selection games.
2013    ** (PGP only)
2014    */
2015   {"crypt_replyencrypt", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCRYPTREPLYENCRYPT, "yes" },
2016   /*
2017    ** .pp
2018    ** If \fIset\fP, automatically PGP or OpenSSL encrypt replies to messages which are
2019    ** encrypted.
2020    ** (Crypto only)
2021    */
2022   {"crypt_replysign", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCRYPTREPLYSIGN, "no" },
2023   /*
2024    ** .pp
2025    ** If \fIset\fP, automatically PGP or OpenSSL sign replies to messages which are
2026    ** signed.
2027    ** .pp
2028    ** \fBNote:\fP this does not work on messages that are encrypted \fBand\fP signed!
2029    ** (Crypto only)
2030    */
2031   {"crypt_replysignencrypted", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCRYPTREPLYSIGNENCRYPTED, "no" },
2032   /*
2033    ** .pp
2034    ** If \fIset\fP, automatically PGP or OpenSSL sign replies to messages
2035    ** which are encrypted. This makes sense in combination with
2036    ** ``$$crypt_replyencrypt'', because it allows you to sign all
2037    ** messages which are automatically encrypted.  This works around
2038    ** the problem noted in ``$$crypt_replysign'', that Mutt-ng is not able
2039    ** to find out whether an encrypted message is also signed.
2040    ** (Crypto only)
2041    */
2042   {"crypt_timestamp", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTCRYPTTIMESTAMP, "yes" },
2043   /*
2044    ** .pp
2045    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will include a time stamp in the lines surrounding
2046    ** PGP or S/MIME output, so spoofing such lines is more difficult.
2047    ** If you are using colors to mark these lines, and rely on these,
2048    ** you may \fIunset\fP this setting.
2049    ** (Crypto only)
2050    */
2051   {"pgp_use_gpg_agent", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTUSEGPGAGENT, "no" },
2052   /*
2053    ** .pp
2054    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will use a possibly-running gpg-agent process.
2055    ** (PGP only)
2056    */
2057   {"crypt_verify_sig", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_VERIFYSIG, "yes" },
2058   /*
2059    ** .pp
2060    ** If ``\fIyes\fP'', always attempt to verify PGP or S/MIME signatures.
2061    ** If ``\fIask\fP'', ask whether or not to verify the signature. 
2062    ** If ``\fIno\fP'', never attempt to verify cryptographic signatures.
2063    ** (Crypto only)
2064    */
2065   {"smime_is_default", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSMIMEISDEFAULT, "no" },
2066   /*
2067    ** .pp
2068    ** The default behaviour of Mutt-ng is to use PGP on all auto-sign/encryption
2069    ** operations. To override and to use OpenSSL instead this must be \fIset\fP.
2070    ** .pp
2071    ** However, this has no effect while replying, since Mutt-ng will automatically 
2072    ** select the same application that was used to sign/encrypt the original
2073    ** message.
2074    ** .pp
2075    ** (Note that this variable can be overridden by unsetting $$crypt_autosmime.)
2076    ** (S/MIME only)
2077    */
2078   {"smime_ask_cert_label", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTASKCERTLABEL, "yes" },
2079   /*
2080    ** .pp
2081    ** This flag controls whether you want to be asked to enter a label
2082    ** for a certificate about to be added to the database or not. It is
2083    ** \fIset\fP by default.
2084    ** (S/MIME only)
2085    */
2086   {"smime_decrypt_use_default_key", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSDEFAULTDECRYPTKEY, "yes" },
2087   /*
2088    ** .pp
2089    ** If \fIset\fP (default) this tells Mutt-ng to use the default key for decryption. Otherwise,
2090    ** if manage multiple certificate-key-pairs, Mutt-ng will try to use the mailbox-address
2091    ** to determine the key to use. It will ask you to supply a key, if it can't find one.
2092    ** (S/MIME only)
2093    */
2094   {"pgp_entry_format", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpEntryFormat, "%4n %t%f %4l/0x%k %-4a %2c %u"},
2095   /*
2096    ** .pp
2097    ** This variable allows you to customize the PGP key selection menu to
2098    ** your personal taste. This string is similar to ``$$index_format'', but
2099    ** has its own set of \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences:
2100    ** .pp
2101    ** .dl
2102    ** .dt %n     .dd number
2103    ** .dt %k     .dd key id
2104    ** .dt %u     .dd user id
2105    ** .dt %a     .dd algorithm
2106    ** .dt %l     .dd key length
2107    ** .dt %f     .dd flags
2108    ** .dt %c     .dd capabilities
2109    ** .dt %t     .dd trust/validity of the key-uid association
2110    ** .dt %[<s>] .dd date of the key where <s> is an \fTstrftime(3)\fP expression
2111    ** .de
2112    ** .pp
2113    ** (PGP only)
2114    */
2115   {"pgp_good_sign", DT_RX, R_NONE, UL &PgpGoodSign, "" },
2116   /*
2117    ** .pp
2118    ** If you assign a text to this variable, then a PGP signature is only
2119    ** considered verified if the output from $$pgp_verify_command contains
2120    ** the text. Use this variable if the exit code from the command is 0
2121    ** even for bad signatures.
2122    ** (PGP only)
2123    */
2124   {"pgp_check_exit", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPGPCHECKEXIT, "yes" },
2125   /*
2126    ** .pp
2127    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will check the exit code of the PGP subprocess when
2128    ** signing or encrypting.  A non-zero exit code means that the
2129    ** subprocess failed.
2130    ** (PGP only)
2131    */
2132   {"pgp_long_ids", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPGPLONGIDS, "no" },
2133   /*
2134    ** .pp
2135    ** If \fIset\fP, use 64 bit PGP key IDs. \fIUnset\fP uses the normal 32 bit Key IDs.
2136    ** (PGP only)
2137    */
2138   {"pgp_retainable_sigs", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPGPRETAINABLESIG, "no" },
2139   /*
2140    ** .pp
2141    ** If \fIset\fP, signed and encrypted messages will consist of nested
2142    ** multipart/signed and multipart/encrypted body parts.
2143    ** .pp
2144    ** This is useful for applications like encrypted and signed mailing
2145    ** lists, where the outer layer (multipart/encrypted) can be easily
2146    ** removed, while the inner multipart/signed part is retained.
2147    ** (PGP only)
2148    */
2149   {"pgp_autoinline", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPGPAUTOINLINE, "no" },
2150   /*
2151    ** .pp
2152    ** This option controls whether Mutt-ng generates old-style inline
2153    ** (traditional) PGP encrypted or signed messages under certain
2154    ** circumstances.  This can be overridden by use of the \fIpgp-menu\fP,
2155    ** when inline is not required.
2156    ** .pp
2157    ** Note that Mutt-ng might automatically use PGP/MIME for messages
2158    ** which consist of more than a single MIME part.  Mutt-ng can be
2159    ** configured to ask before sending PGP/MIME messages when inline
2160    ** (traditional) would not work.
2161    ** See also: ``$$pgp_mime_auto''.
2162    ** .pp
2163    ** Also note that using the old-style PGP message format is \fBstrongly\fP
2164    ** \fBdeprecated\fP.
2165    ** (PGP only)
2166    */
2167   {"pgp_replyinline", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPGPREPLYINLINE, "no" },
2168   /*
2169    ** .pp
2170    ** Setting this variable will cause Mutt-ng to always attempt to
2171    ** create an inline (traditional) message when replying to a
2172    ** message which is PGP encrypted/signed inline.  This can be
2173    ** overridden by use of the \fIpgp-menu\fP, when inline is not
2174    ** required.  This option does not automatically detect if the
2175    ** (replied-to) message is inline; instead it relies on Mutt-ng
2176    ** internals for previously checked/flagged messages.
2177    ** .pp
2178    ** Note that Mutt-ng might automatically use PGP/MIME for messages
2179    ** which consist of more than a single MIME part.  Mutt-ng can be
2180    ** configured to ask before sending PGP/MIME messages when inline
2181    ** (traditional) would not work.
2182    ** See also: ``$$pgp_mime_auto''.
2183    ** .pp
2184    ** Also note that using the old-style PGP message format is \fBstrongly\fP
2185    ** \fBdeprecated\fP.
2186    ** (PGP only)
2187    ** 
2188    */
2189   {"pgp_show_unusable", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPGPSHOWUNUSABLE, "yes" },
2190   /*
2191    ** .pp
2192    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will display non-usable keys on the PGP key selection
2193    ** menu.  This includes keys which have been revoked, have expired, or
2194    ** have been marked as ``disabled'' by the user.
2195    ** (PGP only)
2196    */
2197   {"pgp_sign_as", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpSignAs, "" },
2198   /*
2199    ** .pp
2200    ** If you have more than one key pair, this option allows you to specify
2201    ** which of your private keys to use.  It is recommended that you use the
2202    ** keyid form to specify your key (e.g., ``\fT0x00112233\fP'').
2203    ** (PGP only)
2204    */
2205   {"pgp_strict_enc", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPGPSTRICTENC, "yes" },
2206   /*
2207    ** .pp
2208    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will automatically encode PGP/MIME signed messages as
2209    ** \fTquoted-printable\fP.  Please note that unsetting this variable may
2210    ** lead to problems with non-verifyable PGP signatures, so only change
2211    ** this if you know what you are doing.
2212    ** (PGP only)
2213    */
2214   {"pgp_timeout", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &PgpTimeout, "300" },
2215   /*
2216    ** .pp
2217    ** The number of seconds after which a cached passphrase will expire if
2218    ** not used. Default: 300.
2219    ** (PGP only)
2220    */
2221   {"pgp_sort_keys", DT_SORT|DT_SORT_KEYS, R_NONE, UL &PgpSortKeys, "address" },
2222   /*
2223    ** .pp
2224    ** Specifies how the entries in the ``pgp keys'' menu are sorted. The
2225    ** following are legal values:
2226    ** .pp
2227    ** .dl
2228    ** .dt address .dd sort alphabetically by user id
2229    ** .dt keyid   .dd sort alphabetically by key id
2230    ** .dt date    .dd sort by key creation date
2231    ** .dt trust   .dd sort by the trust of the key
2232    ** .de
2233    ** .pp
2234    ** If you prefer reverse order of the above values, prefix it with
2235    ** ``reverse-''.
2236    ** (PGP only)
2237    */
2238   {"pgp_mime_auto", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_PGPMIMEAUTO, "ask-yes" },
2239   /*
2240    ** .pp
2241    ** This option controls whether Mutt-ng will prompt you for
2242    ** automatically sending a (signed/encrypted) message using
2243    ** PGP/MIME when inline (traditional) fails (for any reason).
2244    ** .pp
2245    ** Also note that using the old-style PGP message format is \fBstrongly\fP
2246    ** \fBdeprecated\fP.
2247    ** (PGP only)
2248    */
2249   {"pgp_auto_decode", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPGPAUTODEC, "no" },
2250   /*
2251    ** .pp
2252    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will automatically attempt to decrypt traditional PGP
2253    ** messages whenever the user performs an operation which ordinarily would
2254    ** result in the contents of the message being operated on.  For example,
2255    ** if the user displays a pgp-traditional message which has not been manually
2256    ** checked with the check-traditional-pgp function, Mutt-ng will automatically
2257    ** check the message for traditional pgp.
2258    */
2259
2260   /* XXX Default values! */
2261
2262   {"pgp_decode_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpDecodeCommand, "" },
2263   /*
2264    ** .pp
2265    ** This format strings specifies a command which is used to decode 
2266    ** application/pgp attachments.
2267    ** .pp
2268    ** The PGP command formats have their own set of \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences:
2269    ** .pp
2270    ** .dl
2271    ** .dt %p .dd Expands to PGPPASSFD=0 when a pass phrase is needed, to an empty
2272    **            string otherwise. Note: This may be used with a %? construct.
2273    ** .dt %f .dd Expands to the name of a file containing a message.
2274    ** .dt %s .dd Expands to the name of a file containing the signature part
2275    ** .          of a multipart/signed attachment when verifying it.
2276    ** .dt %a .dd The value of $$pgp_sign_as.
2277    ** .dt %r .dd One or more key IDs.
2278    ** .de
2279    ** .pp
2280    ** For examples on how to configure these formats for the various versions
2281    ** of PGP which are floating around, see the pgp*.rc and gpg.rc files in
2282    ** the \fTsamples/\fP subdirectory which has been installed on your system
2283    ** alongside the documentation.
2284    ** (PGP only)
2285    */
2286   {"pgp_getkeys_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpGetkeysCommand, "" },
2287   /*
2288    ** .pp
2289    ** This command is invoked whenever Mutt-ng will need public key information.
2290    ** \fT%r\fP is the only \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequence used with this format.
2291    ** (PGP only)
2292    */
2293   {"pgp_verify_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpVerifyCommand, "" },
2294   /*
2295    ** .pp
2296    ** This command is used to verify PGP signatures.
2297    ** (PGP only)
2298    */
2299   {"pgp_decrypt_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpDecryptCommand, "" },
2300   /*
2301    ** .pp
2302    ** This command is used to decrypt a PGP encrypted message.
2303    ** (PGP only)
2304    */
2305   {"pgp_clearsign_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpClearSignCommand, "" },
2306   /*
2307    ** .pp
2308    ** This format is used to create a old-style ``clearsigned'' PGP message.
2309    ** .pp
2310    ** Note that the use of this format is \fBstrongly\fP \fBdeprecated\fP.
2311    ** (PGP only)
2312    */
2313   {"pgp_sign_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpSignCommand, "" },
2314   /*
2315    ** .pp
2316    ** This command is used to create the detached PGP signature for a 
2317    ** multipart/signed PGP/MIME body part.
2318    ** (PGP only)
2319    */
2320   {"pgp_encrypt_sign_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpEncryptSignCommand, "" },
2321   /*
2322    ** .pp
2323    ** This command is used to both sign and encrypt a body part.
2324    ** (PGP only)
2325    */
2326   {"pgp_encrypt_only_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpEncryptOnlyCommand, "" },
2327   /*
2328    ** .pp
2329    ** This command is used to encrypt a body part without signing it.
2330    ** (PGP only)
2331    */
2332   {"pgp_import_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpImportCommand, "" },
2333   /*
2334    ** .pp
2335    ** This command is used to import a key from a message into 
2336    ** the user's public key ring.
2337    ** (PGP only)
2338    */
2339   {"pgp_export_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpExportCommand, "" },
2340   /*
2341    ** .pp
2342    ** This command is used to export a public key from the user's
2343    ** key ring.
2344    ** (PGP only)
2345    */
2346   {"pgp_verify_key_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpVerifyKeyCommand, "" },
2347   /*
2348    ** .pp
2349    ** This command is used to verify key information from the key selection
2350    ** menu.
2351    ** (PGP only)
2352    */
2353   {"pgp_list_secring_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpListSecringCommand, "" },
2354   /*
2355    ** .pp
2356    ** This command is used to list the secret key ring's contents.  The
2357    ** output format must be analogous to the one used by 
2358    ** \fTgpg --list-keys --with-colons\fP.
2359    ** .pp
2360    ** This format is also generated by the \fTpgpring\fP utility which comes 
2361    ** with Mutt-ng.
2362    ** (PGP only)
2363    */
2364   {"pgp_list_pubring_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PgpListPubringCommand, "" },
2365   /*
2366    ** .pp
2367    ** This command is used to list the public key ring's contents.  The
2368    ** output format must be analogous to the one used by 
2369    ** \fTgpg --list-keys --with-colons\fP.
2370    ** .pp
2371    ** This format is also generated by the \fTpgpring\fP utility which comes 
2372    ** with Mutt-ng.
2373    ** (PGP only)
2374    */
2375   {"forward_decrypt", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTFORWDECRYPT, "yes" },
2376   /*
2377    ** .pp
2378    ** Controls the handling of encrypted messages when forwarding a message.
2379    ** When \fIset\fP, the outer layer of encryption is stripped off.  This
2380    ** variable is only used if ``$$mime_forward'' is \fIset\fP and
2381    ** ``$$mime_forward_decode'' is \fIunset\fP.
2382    ** (PGP only)
2383    */
2384   {"smime_timeout", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &SmimeTimeout, "300" },
2385   /*
2386    ** .pp
2387    ** The number of seconds after which a cached passphrase will expire if
2388    ** not used.
2389    ** (S/MIME only)
2390    */
2391   {"smime_encrypt_with", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeCryptAlg, "" },
2392   /*
2393    ** .pp
2394    ** This sets the algorithm that should be used for encryption.
2395    ** Valid choices are ``\fTdes\fP'', ``\fTdes3\fP'', ``\fTrc2-40\fP'',
2396    ** ``\fTrc2-64\fP'', ``\frc2-128\fP''.
2397    ** .pp
2398    ** If \fIunset\fP ``\fI3des\fP'' (TripleDES) is used.
2399    ** (S/MIME only)
2400    */
2401   {"smime_keys", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &SmimeKeys, "" },
2402   /*
2403    ** .pp
2404    ** Since there is no pubring/secring as with PGP, Mutt-ng has to handle
2405    ** storage ad retrieval of keys/certs by itself. This is very basic right now,
2406    ** and stores keys and certificates in two different directories, both
2407    ** named as the hash-value retrieved from OpenSSL. There is an index file
2408    ** which contains mailbox-address keyid pair, and which can be manually
2409    ** edited. This one points to the location of the private keys.
2410    ** (S/MIME only)
2411    */
2412   {"smime_ca_location", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &SmimeCALocation, "" },
2413   /*
2414    ** .pp
2415    ** This variable contains the name of either a directory, or a file which
2416    ** contains trusted certificates for use with OpenSSL.
2417    ** (S/MIME only)
2418    */
2419   {"smime_certificates", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &SmimeCertificates, "" },
2420   /*
2421    ** .pp
2422    ** Since there is no pubring/secring as with PGP, Mutt-ng has to handle
2423    ** storage and retrieval of keys by itself. This is very basic right
2424    ** now, and keys and certificates are stored in two different
2425    ** directories, both named as the hash-value retrieved from
2426    ** OpenSSL. There is an index file which contains mailbox-address
2427    ** keyid pairs, and which can be manually edited. This one points to
2428    ** the location of the certificates.
2429    ** (S/MIME only)
2430    */
2431   {"smime_decrypt_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeDecryptCommand, "" },
2432   /*
2433    ** .pp
2434    ** This format string specifies a command which is used to decrypt
2435    ** \fTapplication/x-pkcs7-mime\fP attachments.
2436    ** .pp
2437    ** The OpenSSL command formats have their own set of \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences
2438    ** similar to PGP's:
2439    ** .pp
2440    ** .dl
2441    ** .dt %f .dd Expands to the name of a file containing a message.
2442    ** .dt %s .dd Expands to the name of a file containing the signature part
2443    ** .          of a multipart/signed attachment when verifying it.
2444    ** .dt %k .dd The key-pair specified with $$smime_default_key
2445    ** .dt %c .dd One or more certificate IDs.
2446    ** .dt %a .dd The algorithm used for encryption.
2447    ** .dt %C .dd CA location:  Depending on whether $$smime_ca_location
2448    ** .          points to a directory or file, this expands to 
2449    ** .          "-CApath $$smime_ca_location" or "-CAfile $$smime_ca_location".
2450    ** .de
2451    ** .pp
2452    ** For examples on how to configure these formats, see the smime.rc in
2453    ** the \fTsamples/\fP subdirectory which has been installed on your system
2454    ** alongside the documentation.
2455    ** (S/MIME only)
2456    */
2457   {"smime_verify_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeVerifyCommand, "" },
2458   /*
2459    ** .pp
2460    ** This command is used to verify S/MIME signatures of type \fTmultipart/signed\fP.
2461    ** (S/MIME only)
2462    */
2463   {"smime_verify_opaque_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeVerifyOpaqueCommand, "" },
2464   /*
2465    ** .pp
2466    ** This command is used to verify S/MIME signatures of type
2467    ** \fTapplication/x-pkcs7-mime\fP.
2468    ** (S/MIME only)
2469    */
2470   {"smime_sign_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeSignCommand, "" },
2471   /*
2472    ** .pp
2473    ** This command is used to created S/MIME signatures of type
2474    ** \fTmultipart/signed\fP, which can be read by all mail clients.
2475    ** (S/MIME only)
2476    */
2477   {"smime_sign_opaque_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeSignOpaqueCommand, "" },
2478   /*
2479    ** .pp
2480    ** This command is used to created S/MIME signatures of type
2481    ** \fTapplication/x-pkcs7-signature\fP, which can only be handled by mail
2482    ** clients supporting the S/MIME extension.
2483    ** (S/MIME only)
2484    */
2485   {"smime_encrypt_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeEncryptCommand, "" },
2486   /*
2487    ** .pp
2488    ** This command is used to create encrypted S/MIME messages.
2489    ** (S/MIME only)
2490    */
2491   {"smime_pk7out_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimePk7outCommand, "" },
2492   /*
2493    ** .pp
2494    ** This command is used to extract PKCS7 structures of S/MIME signatures,
2495    ** in order to extract the public X509 certificate(s).
2496    ** (S/MIME only)
2497    */
2498   {"smime_get_cert_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeGetCertCommand, "" },
2499   /*
2500    ** .pp
2501    ** This command is used to extract X509 certificates from a PKCS7 structure.
2502    ** (S/MIME only)
2503    */
2504   {"smime_get_signer_cert_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeGetSignerCertCommand, "" },
2505   /*
2506    ** .pp
2507    ** This command is used to extract only the signers X509 certificate from a S/MIME
2508    ** signature, so that the certificate's owner may get compared to the
2509    ** email's ``\fTFrom:\fP'' header field.
2510    ** (S/MIME only)
2511    */
2512   {"smime_import_cert_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeImportCertCommand, "" },
2513   /*
2514    ** .pp
2515    ** This command is used to import a certificate via \fTsmime_keysng\fP.
2516    ** (S/MIME only)
2517    */
2518   {"smime_get_cert_email_command", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeGetCertEmailCommand, "" },
2519   /*
2520    ** .pp
2521    ** This command is used to extract the mail address(es) used for storing
2522    ** X509 certificates, and for verification purposes (to check whether the
2523    ** certificate was issued for the sender's mailbox).
2524    ** (S/MIME only)
2525    */
2526   {"smime_default_key", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmimeDefaultKey, "" },
2527   /*
2528    ** .pp
2529    ** This is the default key-pair to use for signing. This must be set to the
2530    ** keyid (the hash-value that OpenSSL generates) to work properly
2531    ** (S/MIME only)
2532    */
2533 #if defined(USE_LIBESMTP)
2534   {"smtp_auth_username", DT_SYN, R_NONE, UL "smtp_user", 0},
2535   {"smtp_user", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmtpAuthUser, "" },
2536   /*
2537    ** .pp
2538    ** Availability: SMTP
2539    **
2540    ** .pp
2541    ** Defines the username to use with SMTP AUTH.  Setting this variable will
2542    ** cause Mutt-ng to attempt to use SMTP AUTH when sending.
2543    */
2544   {"smtp_auth_password", DT_SYN, R_NONE, UL "smtp_pass", 0},
2545   {"smtp_pass", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmtpAuthPass, "" },
2546   /*
2547    ** .pp
2548    ** Availability: SMTP
2549    **
2550    ** .pp
2551    ** Defines the password to use with SMTP AUTH.  If ``$$smtp_user''
2552    ** is set, but this variable is not, you will be prompted for a password
2553    ** when sending.
2554    ** .pp
2555    ** \fBNote:\fP Storing passwords in a configuration file
2556    ** presents a security risk since the superuser of your machine may read it
2557    ** regardless of the file's permissions.  
2558    */
2559   {"smtp_envelope", DT_SYN, R_NONE, UL "envelope_from_address", 0 },
2560
2561   {"smtp_host", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmtpHost, "" },
2562   /*
2563    ** .pp
2564    ** Availability: SMTP
2565    **
2566    ** .pp
2567    ** Defines the SMTP host which will be used to deliver mail, as opposed
2568    ** to invoking the sendmail binary.  Setting this variable overrides the
2569    ** value of ``$$sendmail'', and any associated variables.
2570    */
2571   {"smtp_port", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &SmtpPort, "25" },
2572   /*
2573    ** .pp
2574    ** Availability: SMTP
2575    **
2576    ** .pp
2577    ** Defines the port that the SMTP host is listening on for mail delivery.
2578    ** Must be specified as a number.
2579    ** .pp
2580    ** Defaults to 25, the standard SMTP port, but RFC 2476-compliant SMTP
2581    ** servers will probably desire 587, the mail submission port.
2582    */
2583   {"smtp_use_tls", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SmtpUseTLS, "" },
2584   /*
2585    ** .pp
2586    ** Availability: SMTP (and SSL)
2587    **
2588    ** .pp
2589    ** Defines wether to use STARTTLS. If this option is set to ``\fIrequired\fP''
2590    ** and the server does not support STARTTLS or there is an error in the
2591    ** TLS Handshake, the connection will fail. Setting this to ``\fIenabled\fP''
2592    ** will try to start TLS and continue without TLS in case of an error.
2593    **
2594    **.pp
2595    ** Muttng still needs to have SSL support enabled in order to use it.
2596    */
2597 #endif
2598 #if defined(USE_SSL) || defined(USE_GNUTLS)
2599 #ifdef USE_SSL
2600   {"ssl_client_cert", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &SslClientCert, "" },
2601   /*
2602    ** .pp
2603    ** Availability: SSL
2604    **
2605    ** .pp
2606    ** The file containing a client certificate and its associated private
2607    ** key.
2608    */
2609 #endif /* USE_SSL */
2610   {"ssl_force_tls", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSSLFORCETLS, "no" },
2611   /*
2612    ** .pp
2613    ** If this variable is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will require that all connections
2614    ** to remote servers be encrypted. Furthermore it will attempt to
2615    ** negotiate TLS even if the server does not advertise the capability,
2616    ** since it would otherwise have to abort the connection anyway. This
2617    ** option supersedes ``$$ssl_starttls''.
2618    */
2619   {"ssl_starttls", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_SSLSTARTTLS, "yes" },
2620   /*
2621    ** .pp
2622    ** Availability: SSL or GNUTLS
2623    **
2624    ** .pp
2625    ** If \fIset\fP (the default), Mutt-ng will attempt to use STARTTLS on servers
2626    ** advertising the capability. When \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will not attempt to
2627    ** use STARTTLS regardless of the server's capabilities.
2628    */
2629   {"certificate_file", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &SslCertFile, "~/.mutt_certificates"},
2630   /*
2631    ** .pp
2632    ** Availability: SSL or GNUTLS
2633    **
2634    ** .pp
2635    ** This variable specifies the file where the certificates you trust
2636    ** are saved. When an unknown certificate is encountered, you are asked
2637    ** if you accept it or not. If you accept it, the certificate can also 
2638    ** be saved in this file and further connections are automatically 
2639    ** accepted.
2640    ** .pp
2641    ** You can also manually add CA certificates in this file. Any server
2642    ** certificate that is signed with one of these CA certificates are 
2643    ** also automatically accepted.
2644    ** .pp
2645    ** Example: \fTset certificate_file=~/.muttng/certificates\fP
2646    */
2647 # if defined(_MAKEDOC) || !defined (USE_GNUTLS)
2648   {"ssl_usesystemcerts", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSSLSYSTEMCERTS, "yes" },
2649   /*
2650    ** .pp
2651    ** Availability: SSL
2652    **
2653    ** .pp
2654    ** If set to \fIyes\fP, Mutt-ng will use CA certificates in the
2655    ** system-wide certificate store when checking if server certificate 
2656    ** is signed by a trusted CA.
2657    */
2658   {"entropy_file", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &SslEntropyFile, "" },
2659   /*
2660    ** .pp
2661    ** Availability: SSL
2662    **
2663    ** .pp
2664    ** The file which includes random data that is used to initialize SSL
2665    ** library functions.
2666    */
2667   {"ssl_use_sslv2", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSSLV2, "no" },
2668   /*
2669    ** .pp
2670    ** Availability: SSL
2671    **
2672    ** .pp
2673    ** This variables specifies whether to attempt to use SSLv2 in the
2674    ** SSL authentication process.
2675    */
2676 # endif /* _MAKEDOC || !USE_GNUTLS */
2677   {"ssl_use_sslv3", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSSLV3, "yes" },
2678   /*
2679    ** .pp
2680    ** Availability: SSL or GNUTLS
2681    **
2682    ** .pp
2683    ** This variables specifies whether to attempt to use SSLv3 in the
2684    ** SSL authentication process.
2685    */
2686   {"ssl_use_tlsv1", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTTLSV1, "yes" },
2687   /*
2688    ** .pp
2689    ** Availability: SSL or GNUTLS
2690    **
2691    ** .pp
2692    ** This variables specifies whether to attempt to use TLSv1 in the
2693    ** SSL authentication process.
2694    */
2695 # ifdef USE_GNUTLS
2696   {"ssl_min_dh_prime_bits", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &SslDHPrimeBits, "0" },
2697   /*
2698    ** .pp
2699    ** Availability: GNUTLS
2700    **
2701    ** .pp
2702    ** This variable specifies the minimum acceptable prime size (in bits)
2703    ** for use in any Diffie-Hellman key exchange. A value of 0 will use
2704    ** the default from the GNUTLS library.
2705    */
2706   {"ssl_ca_certificates_file", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &SslCACertFile, "" },
2707   /*
2708    ** .pp
2709    ** This variable specifies a file containing trusted CA certificates.
2710    ** Any server certificate that is signed with one of these CA
2711    ** certificates are also automatically accepted.
2712    ** .pp
2713    ** Example: \fTset ssl_ca_certificates_file=/etc/ssl/certs/ca-certificates.crt\fP
2714    */
2715 # endif /* USE_GNUTLS */
2716 # endif /* USE_SSL || USE_GNUTLS */
2717   {"pipe_split", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPIPESPLIT, "no" },
2718   /*
2719    ** .pp
2720    ** Used in connection with the \fIpipe-message\fP command and the ``tag-
2721    ** prefix'' or ``tag-prefix-cond'' operators. 
2722    ** If this variable is \fIunset\fP, when piping a list of
2723    ** tagged messages Mutt-ng will concatenate the messages and will pipe them
2724    ** as a single folder.  When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will pipe the messages one by one.
2725    ** In both cases the messages are piped in the current sorted order,
2726    ** and the ``$$pipe_sep'' separator is added after each message.
2727    */
2728   {"pipe_decode", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPIPEDECODE, "no" },
2729   /*
2730    ** .pp
2731    ** Used in connection with the \fIpipe-message\fP command.  When \fIunset\fP,
2732    ** Mutt-ng will pipe the messages without any preprocessing. When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng
2733    ** will weed headers and will attempt to PGP/MIME decode the messages
2734    ** first.
2735    */
2736   {"pipe_sep", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PipeSep, "\n"},
2737   /*
2738    ** .pp
2739    ** The separator to add between messages when piping a list of tagged
2740    ** messages to an external Unix command.
2741    */
2742   {"pop_authenticators", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PopAuthenticators, "" },
2743   /*
2744    ** .pp
2745    ** This is a colon-delimited list of authentication methods Mutt-ng may
2746    ** attempt to use to log in to an POP server, in the order Mutt-ng should
2747    ** try them.  Authentication methods are either ``\fTuser\fP'', ``\fTapop\fP''
2748    ** or any SASL mechanism, eg ``\fTdigest-md5\fP'', ``\fTgssapi\fP'' or ``\fTcram-md5\fP''.
2749    ** .pp
2750    ** This parameter is case-insensitive. If this parameter is \fIunset\fP
2751    ** (the default) Mutt-ng will try all available methods, in order from
2752    ** most-secure to least-secure.
2753    ** .pp
2754    ** Example: \fTset pop_authenticators="digest-md5:apop:user"\fP
2755    */
2756   {"pop_auth_try_all", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPOPAUTHTRYALL, "yes" },
2757   /*
2758    ** .pp
2759    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will try all available methods. When \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will
2760    ** only fall back to other authentication methods if the previous
2761    ** methods are unavailable. If a method is available but authentication
2762    ** fails, Mutt-ng will not connect to the POP server.
2763    */
2764   {"pop_checkinterval", DT_SYN, R_NONE, UL "pop_mail_check", 0},
2765   {"pop_mail_check", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &PopCheckTimeout, "60" },
2766   /*
2767    ** .pp
2768    ** This variable configures how often (in seconds) Mutt-ng should look for
2769    ** new mail.
2770    */
2771   {"pop_delete", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_POPDELETE, "ask-no" },
2772   /*
2773    ** .pp
2774    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will delete successfully downloaded messages from the POP
2775    ** server when using the ``fetch-mail'' function.  When \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will
2776    ** download messages but also leave them on the POP server.
2777    */
2778   {"pop_host", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PopHost, ""},
2779   /*
2780    ** .pp
2781    ** The name of your POP server for the ``fetch-mail'' function.  You
2782    ** can also specify an alternative port, username and password, i.e.:
2783    ** .pp
2784    ** \fT[pop[s]://][username[:password]@]popserver[:port]\fP
2785    ** .pp
2786    ** \fBNote:\fP Storing passwords in a configuration file
2787    ** presents a security risk since the superuser of your machine may read it
2788    ** regardless of the file's permissions.
2789    */
2790   {"pop_last", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPOPLAST, "no" },
2791   /*
2792    ** .pp
2793    ** If this variable is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will try to use the ``\fTLAST\fP'' POP command
2794    ** for retrieving only unread messages from the POP server when using
2795    ** the ``fetch-mail'' function.
2796    */
2797   {"pop_reconnect", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_POPRECONNECT, "ask-yes" },
2798   /*
2799    ** .pp
2800    ** Controls whether or not Mutt-ng will try to reconnect to a POP server if the
2801    ** connection is lost.
2802    */
2803   {"pop_user", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PopUser, "" },
2804   /*
2805    ** .pp
2806    ** Your login name on the POP server.
2807    ** .pp
2808    ** This variable defaults to your user name on the local machine.
2809    */
2810   {"pop_pass", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PopPass, ""},
2811   /*
2812    ** .pp
2813    ** Specifies the password for your POP account.  If \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will
2814    ** prompt you for your password when you open POP mailbox.
2815    ** .pp
2816    ** \fBNote:\fP Storing passwords in a configuration file
2817    ** presents a security risk since the superuser of your machine may read it
2818    ** regardless of the file's permissions.
2819    */
2820   {"post_indent_string", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &PostIndentString, ""},
2821   /*
2822    ** .pp
2823    ** Similar to the ``$$attribution'' variable, Mutt-ng will append this
2824    ** string after the inclusion of a message which is being replied to.
2825    */
2826 #ifdef USE_NNTP
2827   {"nntp_post_moderated", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_TOMODERATED, "ask-yes" },
2828   /*
2829    ** .pp
2830    ** Availability: NNTP
2831    **
2832    ** .pp
2833    ** If set to \fIyes\fP, Mutt-ng will post articles to newsgroup that have
2834    ** not permissions to post (e.g. moderated).
2835    ** .pp
2836    ** \fBNote:\fP if the newsserver
2837    ** does not support posting to that newsgroup or a group is totally read-only, that
2838    ** posting will not have any effect.
2839    */
2840 #endif
2841   {"postpone", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_POSTPONE, "ask-yes" },
2842   /*
2843    ** .pp
2844    ** Controls whether or not messages are saved in the ``$$postponed''
2845    ** mailbox when you elect not to send immediately.
2846    */
2847   {"postponed", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Postponed, "~/postponed"},
2848   /*
2849    ** .pp
2850    ** Mutt-ng allows you to indefinitely ``$postpone sending a message'' which
2851    ** you are editing.  When you choose to postpone a message, Mutt-ng saves it
2852    ** in the mailbox specified by this variable.  Also see the ``$$postpone''
2853    ** variable.
2854    */
2855   {"preconnect", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &Preconnect, "" },
2856   /*
2857    ** .pp
2858    ** If \fIset\fP, a shell command to be executed if Mutt-ng fails to establish
2859    ** a connection to the server. This is useful for setting up secure
2860    ** connections, e.g. with \fTssh(1)\fP. If the command returns a  nonzero
2861    ** status, Mutt-ng gives up opening the server. Example:
2862    ** .pp
2863    ** \fTpreconnect="ssh -f -q -L 1234:mailhost.net:143 mailhost.net
2864    **                sleep 20 < /dev/null > /dev/null"\fP
2865    ** .pp
2866    ** Mailbox ``foo'' on mailhost.net can now be reached
2867    ** as ``{localhost:1234}foo''.
2868    ** .pp
2869    ** \fBNote:\fP For this example to work, you must be able to log in to the
2870    ** remote machine without having to enter a password.
2871    */
2872   {"print", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_PRINT, "ask-no" },
2873   /*
2874    ** .pp
2875    ** Controls whether or not Mutt-ng really prints messages.
2876    ** This is set to \fIask-no\fP by default, because some people
2877    ** accidentally hit ``p'' often.
2878    */
2879   {"print_command", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &PrintCmd, "lpr"},
2880   /*
2881    ** .pp
2882    ** This specifies the command pipe that should be used to print messages.
2883    */
2884   {"print_decode", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPRINTDECODE, "yes" },
2885   /*
2886    ** .pp
2887    ** Used in connection with the print-message command.  If this
2888    ** option is \fIset\fP, the message is decoded before it is passed to the
2889    ** external command specified by $$print_command.  If this option
2890    ** is \fIunset\fP, no processing will be applied to the message when
2891    ** printing it.  The latter setting may be useful if you are using
2892    ** some advanced printer filter which is able to properly format
2893    ** e-mail messages for printing.
2894    */
2895   {"print_split", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPRINTSPLIT, "no" },
2896   /*
2897    ** .pp
2898    ** Used in connection with the print-message command.  If this option
2899    ** is \fIset\fP, the command specified by $$print_command is executed once for
2900    ** each message which is to be printed.  If this option is \fIunset\fP, 
2901    ** the command specified by $$print_command is executed only once, and
2902    ** all the messages are concatenated, with a form feed as the message
2903    ** separator.
2904    ** .pp
2905    ** Those who use the \fTenscript(1)\fP program's mail-printing mode will
2906    ** most likely want to set this option.
2907    */
2908   {"prompt_after", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTPROMPTAFTER, "yes" },
2909   /*
2910    ** .pp
2911    ** If you use an \fIexternal\fP ``$$pager'', setting this variable will
2912    ** cause Mutt-ng to prompt you for a command when the pager exits rather
2913    ** than returning to the index menu.  If \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will return to the
2914    ** index menu when the external pager exits.
2915    */
2916   {"query_command", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &QueryCmd, ""},
2917   /*
2918    ** .pp
2919    ** This specifies the command that Mutt-ng will use to make external address
2920    ** queries.  The string should contain a \fT%s\fP, which will be substituted
2921    ** with the query string the user types.  See ``$query'' for more
2922    ** information.
2923    */
2924   {"quit", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_QUIT, "yes" },
2925   /*
2926    ** .pp
2927    ** This variable controls whether ``quit'' and ``exit'' actually quit
2928    ** from Mutt-ng.  If it set to \fIyes\fP, they do quit, if it is set to \fIno\fP, they
2929    ** have no effect, and if it is set to \fIask-yes\fP or \fIask-no\fP, you are
2930    ** prompted for confirmation when you try to quit.
2931    */
2932   {"quote_empty", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTQUOTEEMPTY, "yes" },
2933   /*
2934    ** .pp
2935    ** Controls whether or not empty lines will be quoted using
2936    ** ``$indent_string''.
2937    */
2938   {"quote_quoted", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTQUOTEQUOTED, "no" },
2939   /*
2940    ** .pp
2941    ** Controls how quoted lines will be quoted. If \fIset\fP, one quote
2942    ** character will be added to the end of existing prefix.  Otherwise,
2943    ** quoted lines will be prepended by ``$indent_string''.
2944    */
2945   {"quote_regexp", DT_RX, R_PAGER, UL &QuoteRegexp, "^([ \t]*[|>:}#])+"},
2946   /*
2947    ** .pp
2948    ** A regular expression used in the internal-pager to determine quoted
2949    ** sections of text in the body of a message.
2950    ** .pp
2951    ** \fBNote:\fP In order to use the \fIquoted\fP\fBx\fP patterns in the
2952    ** internal pager, you need to set this to a regular expression that
2953    ** matches \fIexactly\fP the quote characters at the beginning of quoted
2954    ** lines.
2955    */
2956   {"read_inc", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &ReadInc, "10" },
2957   /*
2958    ** .pp
2959    ** If set to a value greater than 0, Mutt-ng will display which message it
2960    ** is currently on when reading a mailbox.  The message is printed after
2961    ** \fIread_inc\fP messages have been read (e.g., if set to 25, Mutt-ng will
2962    ** print a message when it reads message 25, and then again when it gets
2963    ** to message 50).  This variable is meant to indicate progress when
2964    ** reading large mailboxes which may take some time.
2965    ** When set to 0, only a single message will appear before the reading
2966    ** the mailbox.
2967    ** .pp
2968    ** Also see the ``$$write_inc'' variable.
2969    */
2970   {"read_only", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTREADONLY, "no" },
2971   /*
2972    ** .pp
2973    ** If set, all folders are opened in read-only mode.
2974    */
2975   {"realname", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &Realname, "" },
2976   /*
2977    ** .pp
2978    ** This variable specifies what ``real'' or ``personal'' name should be used
2979    ** when sending messages.
2980    ** .pp
2981    ** By default, this is the GECOS field from \fT/etc/passwd\fP.
2982    ** .pp
2983    ** \fINote:\fP This
2984    ** variable will \fInot\fP be used when the user has set a real name
2985    ** in the $$from variable.
2986    */
2987   {"recall", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_RECALL, "ask-yes" },
2988   /*
2989    ** .pp
2990    ** Controls whether or not Mutt-ng recalls postponed messages
2991    ** when composing a new message.  Also see ``$$postponed''.
2992    ** .pp
2993    ** Setting this variable to \fIyes\fP is not generally useful, and thus not
2994    ** recommended.
2995    */
2996   {"record", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Outbox, ""},
2997   /*
2998    ** .pp
2999    ** This specifies the file into which your outgoing messages should be
3000    ** appended.  (This is meant as the primary method for saving a copy of
3001    ** your messages, but another way to do this is using the ``$my_hdr''
3002    ** command to create a \fTBcc:\fP header field with your email address in it.)
3003    ** .pp
3004    ** The value of \fI$$record\fP is overridden by the ``$$force_name'' and
3005    ** ``$$save_name'' variables, and the ``$fcc-hook'' command.
3006    */
3007   {"reply_regexp", DT_RX, R_INDEX|R_RESORT, UL &ReplyRegexp, "^(re([\\[0-9\\]+])*|aw):[ \t]*"},
3008   /*
3009    ** .pp
3010    ** A regular expression used to recognize reply messages when threading
3011    ** and replying. The default value corresponds to the English ``Re:'' and
3012    ** the German ``Aw:''.
3013    */
3014   {"reply_self", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTREPLYSELF, "no" },
3015   /*
3016    ** .pp
3017    ** If \fIunset\fP and you are replying to a message sent by you, Mutt-ng will
3018    ** assume that you want to reply to the recipients of that message rather
3019    ** than to yourself.
3020    */
3021   {"reply_to", DT_QUAD, R_NONE, OPT_REPLYTO, "ask-yes" },
3022   /*
3023    ** .pp
3024    ** If \fIset\fP, when replying to a message, Mutt-ng will use the address listed
3025    ** in the ``\fTReply-To:\fP'' header field as the recipient of the reply.  If \fIunset\fP,
3026    ** it will use the address in the ``\fTFrom:\fP'' header field instead.
3027    ** .pp 
3028    ** This
3029    ** option is useful for reading a mailing list that sets the ``\fTReply-To:\fP''
3030    ** header field to the list address and you want to send a private
3031    ** message to the author of a message.
3032    */
3033   {"resolve", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTRESOLVE, "yes" },
3034   /*
3035    ** .pp
3036    ** When set, the cursor will be automatically advanced to the next
3037    ** (possibly undeleted) message whenever a command that modifies the
3038    ** current message is executed.
3039    */
3040   {"reverse_alias", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTREVALIAS, "no" },
3041   /*
3042    ** .pp
3043    ** This variable controls whether or not Mutt-ng will display the ``personal''
3044    ** name from your aliases in the index menu if it finds an alias that
3045    ** matches the message's sender.  For example, if you have the following
3046    ** alias:
3047    ** .pp
3048    **  \fTalias juser abd30425@somewhere.net (Joe User)\fP
3049    ** .pp
3050    ** and then you receive mail which contains the following header:
3051    ** .pp
3052    **  \fTFrom: abd30425@somewhere.net\fP
3053    ** .pp
3054    ** It would be displayed in the index menu as ``Joe User'' instead of
3055    ** ``abd30425@somewhere.net.''  This is useful when the person's e-mail
3056    ** address is not human friendly (like CompuServe addresses).
3057    */
3058   {"reverse_name", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTREVNAME, "no" },
3059   /*
3060    ** .pp
3061    ** It may sometimes arrive that you receive mail to a certain machine,
3062    ** move the messages to another machine, and reply to some the messages
3063    ** from there.  If this variable is \fIset\fP, the default \fTFrom:\fP line of
3064    ** the reply messages is built using the address where you received the
3065    ** messages you are replying to \fBif\fP that address matches your
3066    ** alternates.  If the variable is \fIunset\fP, or the address that would be
3067    ** used doesn't match your alternates, the \fTFrom:\fP line will use
3068    ** your address on the current machine.
3069    */
3070   {"reverse_realname", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTREVREAL, "yes" },
3071   /*
3072    ** .pp
3073    ** This variable fine-tunes the behaviour of the $reverse_name feature.
3074    ** When it is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will use the address from incoming messages as-is,
3075    ** possibly including eventual real names.  When it is \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will
3076    ** override any such real names with the setting of the $realname variable.
3077    */
3078   {"rfc2047_parameters", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTRFC2047PARAMS, "no" },
3079   /*
3080    ** .pp
3081    ** When this variable is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will decode RFC-2047-encoded MIME 
3082    ** parameters. You want to set this variable when Mutt-ng suggests you
3083    ** to save attachments to files named like this:
3084    ** .pp
3085    **  \fT=?iso-8859-1?Q?file=5F=E4=5F991116=2Ezip?=\fP
3086    ** .pp
3087    ** When this variable is \fIset\fP interactively, the change doesn't have
3088    ** the desired effect before you have changed folders.
3089    ** .pp
3090    ** Note that this use of RFC 2047's encoding is explicitly,
3091    ** prohibited by the standard, but nevertheless encountered in the
3092    ** wild.
3093    ** .pp
3094    ** Also note that setting this parameter will \fInot\fP have the effect 
3095    ** that Mutt-ng \fIgenerates\fP this kind of encoding.  Instead, Mutt-ng will
3096    ** unconditionally use the encoding specified in RFC 2231.
3097    */
3098   {"save_address", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSAVEADDRESS, "no" },
3099   /*
3100    ** .pp
3101    ** If \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will take the sender's full address when choosing a
3102    ** default folder for saving a mail. If ``$$save_name'' or ``$$force_name''
3103    ** is \fIset\fP too, the selection of the fcc folder will be changed as well.
3104    */
3105   {"save_empty", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSAVEEMPTY, "yes" },
3106   /*
3107    ** .pp
3108    ** When \fIunset\fP, mailboxes which contain no saved messages will be removed
3109    ** when closed (the exception is ``$$spoolfile'' which is never removed).
3110    ** If \fIset\fP, mailboxes are never removed.
3111    ** .pp
3112    ** \fBNote:\fP This only applies to mbox and MMDF folders, Mutt-ng does not
3113    ** delete MH and Maildir directories.
3114    */
3115   {"save_name", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSAVENAME, "no" },
3116   /*
3117    ** .pp
3118    ** This variable controls how copies of outgoing messages are saved.
3119    ** When set, a check is made to see if a mailbox specified by the
3120    ** recipient address exists (this is done by searching for a mailbox in
3121    ** the ``$$folder'' directory with the \fIusername\fP part of the
3122    ** recipient address).  If the mailbox exists, the outgoing message will
3123    ** be saved to that mailbox, otherwise the message is saved to the
3124    ** ``$$record'' mailbox.
3125    ** .pp
3126    ** Also see the ``$$force_name'' variable.
3127    */
3128   {"score", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSCORE, "yes" },
3129   /*
3130    ** .pp
3131    ** When this variable is \fIunset\fP, scoring is turned off.  This can
3132    ** be useful to selectively disable scoring for certain folders when the
3133    ** ``$$score_threshold_delete'' variable and friends are used.
3134    **
3135    */
3136   {"score_threshold_delete", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &ScoreThresholdDelete, "-1" },
3137   /*
3138    ** .pp
3139    ** Messages which have been assigned a score equal to or lower than the value
3140    ** of this variable are automatically marked for deletion by Mutt-ng.  Since
3141    ** Mutt-ng scores are always greater than or equal to zero, the default setting
3142    ** of this variable will never mark a message for deletion.
3143    */
3144   {"score_threshold_flag", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &ScoreThresholdFlag, "9999" },
3145   /* 
3146    ** .pp
3147    ** Messages which have been assigned a score greater than or equal to this 
3148    ** variable's value are automatically marked ``flagged''.
3149    */
3150   {"score_threshold_read", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &ScoreThresholdRead, "-1" },
3151   /*
3152    ** .pp
3153    ** Messages which have been assigned a score equal to or lower than the value
3154    ** of this variable are automatically marked as read by Mutt-ng.  Since
3155    ** Mutt-ng scores are always greater than or equal to zero, the default setting
3156    ** of this variable will never mark a message read.
3157    */
3158   {"send_charset", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SendCharset, "us-ascii:iso-8859-1:utf-8"},
3159   /*
3160    ** .pp
3161    ** A list of character sets for outgoing messages. Mutt-ng will use the
3162    ** first character set into which the text can be converted exactly.
3163    ** If your ``$$charset'' is not \fTiso-8859-1\fP and recipients may not
3164    ** understand \fTUTF-8\fP, it is advisable to include in the list an
3165    ** appropriate widely used standard character set (such as
3166    ** \fTiso-8859-2\fP, \fTkoi8-r\fP or \fTiso-2022-jp\fP) either
3167    ** instead of or after \fTiso-8859-1\fP.
3168    */
3169   {"sendmail", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Sendmail, SENDMAIL " -oem -oi"},
3170   /*
3171    ** .pp
3172    ** Specifies the program and arguments used to deliver mail sent by Mutt-ng.
3173    ** Mutt-ng expects that the specified program interprets additional
3174    ** arguments as recipient addresses.
3175    */
3176   {"sendmail_wait", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &SendmailWait, "0" },
3177   /*
3178    ** .pp
3179    ** Specifies the number of seconds to wait for the ``$$sendmail'' process
3180    ** to finish before giving up and putting delivery in the background.
3181    ** .pp
3182    ** Mutt-ng interprets the value of this variable as follows:
3183    ** .dl
3184    ** .dt >0 .dd number of seconds to wait for sendmail to finish before continuing
3185    ** .dt 0  .dd wait forever for sendmail to finish
3186    ** .dt <0 .dd always put sendmail in the background without waiting
3187    ** .de
3188    ** .pp
3189    ** Note that if you specify a value other than 0, the output of the child
3190    ** process will be put in a temporary file.  If there is some error, you
3191    ** will be informed as to where to find the output.
3192    */
3193   {"shell", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Shell, "" },
3194   /*
3195    ** .pp
3196    ** Command to use when spawning a subshell.  By default, the user's login
3197    ** shell from \fT/etc/passwd\fP is used.
3198    */
3199 #ifdef USE_NNTP
3200   {"nntp_save_unsubscribed", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSAVEUNSUB, "no" },
3201   /*
3202    ** .pp
3203    ** Availability: NNTP
3204    **
3205    ** .pp
3206    ** When \fIset\fP, info about unsubscribed newsgroups will be saved into the
3207    ** ``newsrc'' file and into the news cache.
3208    */
3209 #endif
3210 #ifdef USE_NNTP
3211   {"nntp_show_new_news", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSHOWNEWNEWS, "yes" },
3212   /*
3213    ** .pp
3214    ** Availability: NNTP
3215    **
3216    ** .pp
3217    ** If \fIset\fP, the newsserver will be asked for new newsgroups on entering
3218    ** the browser.  Otherwise, it will be done only once for a newsserver.
3219    ** Also controls whether or not the number of new articles of subscribed
3220    ** newsgroups will be checked.
3221    */
3222   {"nntp_show_only_unread", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSHOWONLYUNREAD, "no" },
3223   /*
3224    ** .pp
3225    ** Availability: NNTP
3226    **
3227    ** .pp
3228    ** If \fIset\fP, only subscribed newsgroups that contain unread articles
3229    ** will be displayed in the newsgroup browser.
3230    */
3231 #endif
3232   {"sig_dashes", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSIGDASHES, "yes" },
3233   /*
3234    ** .pp
3235    ** If set, a line containing ``\fT-- \fP'' (dash, dash, space)
3236    ** will be inserted before your ``$$signature''.  It is \fBstrongly\fP
3237    ** recommended that you not unset this variable unless your ``signature''
3238    ** contains just your name. The reason for this is because many software
3239    ** packages use ``\fT-- \n\fP'' to detect your signature.
3240    ** .pp
3241    ** For example, Mutt-ng has the ability to highlight
3242    ** the signature in a different color in the builtin pager.
3243    */
3244   {"sig_on_top", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSIGONTOP, "no" },
3245   /*
3246    ** .pp
3247    ** If \fIset\fP, the signature will be included before any quoted or forwarded
3248    ** text.  It is \fBstrongly\fP recommended that you do not set this variable
3249    ** unless you really know what you are doing, and are prepared to take
3250    ** some heat from netiquette guardians.
3251    */
3252   {"signature", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Signature, "~/.signature"},
3253   /*
3254    ** .pp
3255    ** Specifies the filename of your signature, which is appended to all
3256    ** outgoing messages.   If the filename ends with a pipe (``\fT|\fP''), it is
3257    ** assumed that filename is a shell command and input should be read from
3258    ** its stdout.
3259    */
3260   {"signoff_string", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SignOffString, "" },
3261   /*
3262    ** .pp
3263    ** If \fIset\fP, this string will be inserted before the signature. This is useful
3264    ** for people that want to sign off every message they send with their name.
3265    ** .pp
3266    ** If you want to insert your website's URL, additional contact information or 
3267    ** witty quotes into your mails, better use a signature file instead of
3268    ** the signoff string.
3269    */
3270   {"simple_search", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SimpleSearch, "~f %s | ~s %s"},
3271   /*
3272    ** .pp
3273    ** Specifies how Mutt-ng should expand a simple search into a real search
3274    ** pattern.  A simple search is one that does not contain any of the ~
3275    ** operators.  See ``$patterns'' for more information on search patterns.
3276    ** .pp
3277    ** For example, if you simply type ``joe'' at a search or limit prompt, Mutt-ng
3278    ** will automatically expand it to the value specified by this variable.
3279    ** For the default value it would be:
3280    ** .pp
3281    ** \fT~f joe | ~s joe\fP
3282    */
3283   {"smart_wrap", DT_BOOL, R_PAGER, OPTWRAP, "yes" },
3284   /*
3285    ** .pp
3286    ** Controls the display of lines longer than the screen width in the
3287    ** internal pager. If \fIset\fP, long lines are wrapped at a word boundary.
3288    ** If \fIunset\fP, lines are simply wrapped at the screen edge. Also see the
3289    ** ``$$markers'' variable.
3290    */
3291   {"smileys", DT_RX, R_PAGER, UL &Smileys, "(>From )|(:[-^]?[][)(><}{|/DP])"},
3292   /*
3293    ** .pp
3294    ** The \fIpager\fP uses this variable to catch some common false
3295    ** positives of ``$$quote_regexp'', most notably smileys in the beginning
3296    ** of a line
3297    */
3298   {"sleep_time", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &SleepTime, "1" },
3299   /*
3300    ** .pp
3301    ** Specifies time, in seconds, to pause while displaying certain informational
3302    ** messages, while moving from folder to folder and after expunging
3303    ** messages from the current folder.  The default is to pause one second, so 
3304    ** a value of zero for this option suppresses the pause.
3305    */
3306   {"sort", DT_SORT, R_INDEX|R_RESORT, UL &Sort, "date" },
3307   /*
3308    ** .pp
3309    ** Specifies how to sort messages in the \fIindex\fP menu.  Valid values
3310    ** are:
3311    ** .pp
3312    ** .ts
3313    ** .  date or date-sent
3314    ** .  date-received
3315    ** .  from
3316    ** .  mailbox-order (unsorted)
3317    ** .  score
3318    ** .  size
3319    ** .  spam
3320    ** .  subject
3321    ** .  threads
3322    ** .  to
3323    ** .te
3324    ** .pp
3325    ** You may optionally use the ``reverse-'' prefix to specify reverse sorting
3326    ** order (example: \fTset sort=reverse-date-sent\fP).
3327    */
3328   {"sort_alias", DT_SORT|DT_SORT_ALIAS, R_NONE, UL &SortAlias, "alias" },
3329   /*
3330    ** .pp
3331    ** Specifies how the entries in the ``alias'' menu are sorted.  The
3332    ** following are legal values:
3333    ** .pp
3334    ** .ts
3335    ** .  address (sort alphabetically by email address)
3336    ** .  alias (sort alphabetically by alias name)
3337    ** .  unsorted (leave in order specified in .muttrc)
3338    ** .te
3339    */
3340   {"sort_aux", DT_SORT|DT_SORT_AUX, R_INDEX|R_RESORT_BOTH, UL &SortAux, "date" },
3341   /*
3342    ** .pp
3343    ** When sorting by threads, this variable controls how threads are sorted
3344    ** in relation to other threads, and how the branches of the thread trees
3345    ** are sorted.  This can be set to any value that ``$$sort'' can, except
3346    ** threads (in that case, Mutt-ng will just use date-sent).  You can also
3347    ** specify the ``last-'' prefix in addition to ``reverse-'' prefix, but last-
3348    ** must come after reverse-.  The last- prefix causes messages to be
3349    ** sorted against its siblings by which has the last descendant, using
3350    ** the rest of sort_aux as an ordering.
3351    ** .pp
3352    ** For instance, \fTset sort_aux=last-date-received\fP would mean that if
3353    ** a new message is received in a thread, that thread becomes the last one
3354    ** displayed (or the first, if you have \fTset sort=reverse-threads\fP.)
3355    ** .pp
3356    ** \fBNote:\fP For reversed ``$$sort'' order $$sort_aux is reversed again
3357    ** (which is not the right thing to do, but kept to not break any existing
3358    ** configuration setting).
3359    */
3360   {"sort_browser", DT_SORT|DT_SORT_BROWSER, R_NONE, UL &BrowserSort, "alpha" },
3361   /*
3362    ** .pp
3363    ** Specifies how to sort entries in the file browser.  By default, the
3364    ** entries are sorted alphabetically.  Valid values:
3365    ** .pp
3366    ** .ts
3367    ** .  alpha (alphabetically)
3368    ** .  date
3369    ** .  size
3370    ** .  unsorted
3371    ** .te
3372    ** .pp
3373    ** You may optionally use the ``reverse-'' prefix to specify reverse sorting
3374    ** order (example: \fTset sort_browser=reverse-date\fP).
3375    */
3376   {"sort_re", DT_BOOL, R_INDEX|R_RESORT|R_RESORT_INIT, OPTSORTRE, "yes" },
3377   /*
3378    ** .pp
3379    ** This variable is only useful when sorting by threads with
3380    ** ``$$strict_threads'' \fIunset\fP. In that case, it changes the heuristic
3381    ** Mutt-ng uses to thread messages by subject.  With $$sort_re \fIset\fP,
3382    ** Mutt-ng will only attach a message as the child of another message by
3383    ** subject if the subject of the child message starts with a substring
3384    ** matching the setting of ``$$reply_regexp''. With $$sort_re \fIunset\fP,
3385    ** Mutt-ng will attach the message whether or not this is the case,
3386    ** as long as the non-``$$reply_regexp'' parts of both messages are identical.
3387    */
3388   {"spam_separator", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &SpamSep, ","},
3389   /*
3390    ** .pp
3391    ** ``$spam_separator'' controls what happens when multiple spam headers
3392    ** are matched: if \fIunset\fP, each successive header will overwrite any
3393    ** previous matches value for the spam label. If \fIset\fP, each successive
3394    ** match will append to the previous, using ``$spam_separator'' as a
3395    ** separator.
3396    */
3397   {"spoolfile", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Spoolfile, "" },
3398   /*
3399    ** .pp
3400    ** If your spool mailbox is in a non-default place where Mutt-ng cannot find
3401    ** it, you can specify its location with this variable.  Mutt-ng will
3402    ** automatically set this variable to the value of the environment
3403    ** variable $$$MAIL if it is not set.
3404    */
3405   {"status_chars", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &StChars, "-*%A"},
3406   /*
3407    ** .pp
3408    ** Controls the characters used by the ``\fT%r\fP'' indicator in
3409    ** ``$$status_format''. The first character is used when the mailbox is
3410    ** unchanged. The second is used when the mailbox has been changed, and
3411    ** it needs to be resynchronized. The third is used if the mailbox is in
3412    ** read-only mode, or if the mailbox will not be written when exiting
3413    ** that mailbox (You can toggle whether to write changes to a mailbox
3414    ** with the toggle-write operation, bound by default to ``\fT%\fP'').
3415    ** The fourth  is used to indicate that the current folder has been
3416    ** opened in attach-message mode (Certain operations like composing
3417    ** a new mail, replying, forwarding, etc. are not permitted in this mode).
3418    */
3419   {"status_format", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &Status, "-%r-Mutt-ng: %f [Msgs:%?M?%M/?%m%?n? New:%n?%?o? Old:%o?%?d? Del:%d?%?F? Flag:%F?%?t? Tag:%t?%?p? Post:%p?%?b? Inc:%b?%?l? %l?]---(%s/%S)-%>-(%P)---"},
3420   /*
3421    ** .pp
3422    ** Controls the format of the status line displayed in the \fIindex\fP
3423    ** menu.  This string is similar to ``$$index_format'', but has its own
3424    ** set of \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequences:
3425    ** .pp
3426    ** .dl
3427    ** .dt %b  .dd number of mailboxes with new mail *
3428    ** .dt %B  .dd the short pathname of the current mailbox
3429    ** .dt %d  .dd number of deleted messages *
3430    ** .dt %f  .dd the full pathname of the current mailbox
3431    ** .dt %F  .dd number of flagged messages *
3432    ** .dt %h  .dd local hostname
3433    ** .dt %l  .dd size (in bytes) of the current mailbox *
3434    ** .dt %L  .dd size (in bytes) of the messages shown 
3435    **             (i.e., which match the current limit) *
3436    ** .dt %m  .dd the number of messages in the mailbox *
3437    ** .dt %M  .dd the number of messages shown (i.e., which match the current limit) *
3438    ** .dt %n  .dd number of new messages in the mailbox *
3439    ** .dt %o  .dd number of old unread messages *
3440    ** .dt %p  .dd number of postponed messages *
3441    ** .dt %P  .dd percentage of the way through the index
3442    ** .dt %r  .dd modified/read-only/won't-write/attach-message indicator,
3443    **             according to $$status_chars
3444    ** .dt %s  .dd current sorting mode ($$sort)
3445    ** .dt %S  .dd current aux sorting method ($$sort_aux)
3446    ** .dt %t  .dd number of tagged messages *
3447    ** .dt %u  .dd number of unread messages *
3448    ** .dt %v  .dd Mutt-ng version string
3449    ** .dt %V  .dd currently active limit pattern, if any *
3450    ** .dt %>X .dd right justify the rest of the string and pad with "X"
3451    ** .dt %|X .dd pad to the end of the line with "X"
3452    ** .de
3453    ** .pp
3454    ** * = can be optionally printed if nonzero
3455    ** .pp
3456    ** Some of the above sequences can be used to optionally print a string
3457    ** if their value is nonzero.  For example, you may only want to see the
3458    ** number of flagged messages if such messages exist, since zero is not
3459    ** particularly meaningful.  To optionally print a string based upon one
3460    ** of the above sequences, the following construct is used
3461    ** .pp
3462    **  \fT%?<sequence_char>?<optional_string>?\fP
3463    ** .pp
3464    ** where \fIsequence_char\fP is a character from the table above, and
3465    ** \fIoptional_string\fP is the string you would like printed if
3466    ** \fIsequence_char\fP is nonzero.  \fIoptional_string\fP \fBmay\fP contain
3467    ** other sequences as well as normal text, but you may \fBnot\fP nest
3468    ** optional strings.
3469    ** .pp
3470    ** Here is an example illustrating how to optionally print the number of
3471    ** new messages in a mailbox:
3472    ** .pp
3473    **  \fT%?n?%n new messages.?\fP
3474    ** .pp
3475    ** Additionally you can switch between two strings, the first one, if a
3476    ** value is zero, the second one, if the value is nonzero, by using the
3477    ** following construct:
3478    ** .pp
3479    **  \fT%?<sequence_char>?<if_string>&<else_string>?\fP
3480    ** .pp
3481    ** You can additionally force the result of any \fTprintf(3)\fP-like sequence
3482    ** to be lowercase by prefixing the sequence character with an underscore
3483    ** (\fT_\fP) sign.  For example, if you want to display the local hostname in
3484    ** lowercase, you would use:
3485    ** .pp
3486    **  \fT%_h\fP
3487    ** .pp
3488    ** If you prefix the sequence character with a colon (\fT:\fP) character, Mutt-ng
3489    ** will replace any dots in the expansion by underscores. This might be helpful 
3490    ** with IMAP folders that don't like dots in folder names.
3491    */
3492   {"status_on_top", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTSTATUSONTOP, "no" },
3493   /*
3494    ** .pp
3495    ** Setting this variable causes the ``status bar'' to be displayed on
3496    ** the first line of the screen rather than near the bottom.
3497    */
3498   {"strict_mailto", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSTRICTMAILTO, "yes" },
3499   /*
3500    **
3501    ** .pp
3502    ** With mailto: style links, a body as well as arbitrary header information
3503    ** may be embedded. This may lead to (user) headers being overwriten without note
3504    ** if ``$$edit_headers'' is unset.
3505    **
3506    ** .pp
3507    ** If this variable is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng is strict and allows anything to be
3508    ** changed. If it's \fIunset\fP, all headers given will be prefixed with
3509    ** ``X-Mailto-'' and the message including headers will be shown in the editor
3510    ** regardless of what ``$$edit_headers'' is set to.
3511    **/
3512   {"strict_mime", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSTRICTMIME, "yes" },
3513   /*
3514    ** .pp
3515    ** When \fIunset\fP, non MIME-compliant messages that doesn't have any
3516    ** charset indication in the ``\fTContent-Type:\fP'' header field can 
3517    ** be displayed (non MIME-compliant messages are often generated by old
3518    ** mailers or buggy mailers like MS Outlook Express).
3519    ** See also $$assumed_charset.
3520    ** .pp
3521    ** This option also replaces linear-white-space between encoded-word
3522    ** and *text to a single space to prevent the display of MIME-encoded
3523    ** ``\fTSubject:\fP'' header field from being devided into multiple lines.
3524    */
3525   {"strict_threads", DT_BOOL, R_RESORT|R_RESORT_INIT|R_INDEX, OPTSTRICTTHREADS, "no" },
3526   /*
3527    ** .pp
3528    ** If \fIset\fP, threading will only make use of the ``\fTIn-Reply-To:\fP'' and
3529    ** ``\fTReferences:\fP'' header fields when you ``$$sort'' by message threads.  By
3530    ** default, messages with the same subject are grouped together in
3531    ** ``pseudo threads.''  This may not always be desirable, such as in a
3532    ** personal mailbox where you might have several unrelated messages with
3533    ** the subject ``hi'' which will get grouped together. See also
3534    ** ``$$sort_re'' for a less drastic way of controlling this
3535    ** behaviour.
3536    */
3537   {"strip_was", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSTRIPWAS, "no" },
3538   /**
3539   ** .pp
3540   ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will remove the trailing part of the ``\fTSubject:\fP''
3541   ** line which matches $$strip_was_regex when replying. This is useful to
3542   ** properly react on subject changes and reduce ``subject noise.'' (esp. in Usenet)
3543   **/
3544   {"strip_was_regex", DT_RX, R_NONE, UL &StripWasRegexp, "\\([Ww][Aa][RrSs]: .*\\)[ ]*$"},
3545   /**
3546   ** .pp
3547   ** When non-empty and $$strip_was is \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will remove this
3548   ** trailing part of the ``Subject'' line when replying if it won't be empty
3549   ** afterwards.
3550   **/
3551   {"stuff_quoted", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTSTUFFQUOTED, "no" },
3552   /*
3553    ** .pp
3554    ** If \fIset\fP, attachments with flowed format will have their quoting ``stuffed'',
3555    ** i.e. a space will be inserted between the quote characters and the actual
3556    ** text.
3557    */
3558   {"suspend", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTSUSPEND, "yes" },
3559   /*
3560    ** .pp
3561    ** When \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng won't stop when the user presses the terminal's
3562    ** \fIsusp\fP key, usually \fTCTRL+Z\fP. This is useful if you run Mutt-ng
3563    ** inside an xterm using a command like ``\fTxterm -e muttng\fP.''
3564    */
3565   {"text_flowed", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTTEXTFLOWED, "no" },
3566   /*
3567    ** .pp
3568    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will generate \fTtext/plain; format=flowed\fP attachments.
3569    ** This format is easier to handle for some mailing software, and generally
3570    ** just looks like ordinary text.  To actually make use of this format's 
3571    ** features, you'll need support in your editor.
3572    ** .pp
3573    ** Note that $$indent_string is ignored when this option is set.
3574    */
3575   {"thread_received", DT_BOOL, R_RESORT|R_RESORT_INIT|R_INDEX, OPTTHREADRECEIVED, "no" },
3576   /*
3577    ** .pp
3578    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng uses the date received rather than the date sent
3579    ** to thread messages by subject.
3580    */
3581   {"thorough_search", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTTHOROUGHSRC, "no" },
3582   /*
3583    ** .pp
3584    ** Affects the \fT~b\fP and \fT~h\fP search operations described in
3585    ** section ``$patterns'' above.  If \fIset\fP, the headers and attachments of
3586    ** messages to be searched are decoded before searching.  If \fIunset\fP,
3587    ** messages are searched as they appear in the folder.
3588    */
3589   {"tilde", DT_BOOL, R_PAGER, OPTTILDE, "no" },
3590   /*
3591    ** .pp
3592    ** When \fIset\fP, the internal-pager will pad blank lines to the bottom of the
3593    ** screen with a tilde (~).
3594    */
3595   {"timeout", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &Timeout, "600" },
3596   /*
3597    ** .pp
3598    ** This variable controls the \fInumber of seconds\fP Mutt-ng will wait
3599    ** for a key to be pressed in the main menu before timing out and
3600    ** checking for new mail.  A value of zero or less will cause Mutt-ng
3601    ** to never time out.
3602    */
3603   {"tmpdir", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Tempdir, "" },
3604   /*
3605    ** .pp
3606    ** This variable allows you to specify where Mutt-ng will place its
3607    ** temporary files needed for displaying and composing messages.  If
3608    ** this variable is not set, the environment variable \fT$$$TMPDIR\fP is
3609    ** used.  If \fT$$$TMPDIR\fP is not set then "\fT/tmp\fP" is used.
3610    */
3611   {"to_chars", DT_STR, R_BOTH, UL &Tochars, " +TCFL"},
3612   /*
3613    ** .pp
3614    ** Controls the character used to indicate mail addressed to you.  The
3615    ** first character is the one used when the mail is NOT addressed to your
3616    ** address (default: space).  The second is used when you are the only
3617    ** recipient of the message (default: +).  The third is when your address
3618    ** appears in the ``\fTTo:\fP'' header field, but you are not the only recipient of
3619    ** the message (default: T).  The fourth character is used when your
3620    ** address is specified in the ``\fTCc:\fP'' header field, but you are not the only
3621    ** recipient.  The fifth character is used to indicate mail that was sent
3622    ** by \fIyou\fP.  The sixth character is used to indicate when a mail
3623    ** was sent to a mailing-list you're subscribe to (default: L).
3624    */
3625   {"trash", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &TrashPath, "" },
3626   /*
3627    ** .pp
3628    ** If \fIset\fP, this variable specifies the path of the trash folder where the
3629    ** mails marked for deletion will be moved, instead of being irremediably
3630    ** purged.
3631    ** .pp
3632    ** \fBNote\fP: When you delete a message in the trash folder, it is really
3633    ** deleted, so that there is no way to recover mail.
3634    */
3635   {"tunnel", DT_STR, R_NONE, UL &Tunnel, "" },
3636   /*
3637    ** .pp
3638    ** Setting this variable will cause Mutt-ng to open a pipe to a command
3639    ** instead of a raw socket. You may be able to use this to set up
3640    ** preauthenticated connections to your IMAP/POP3 server. Example:
3641    ** .pp
3642    **  \fTtunnel="ssh -q mailhost.net /usr/local/libexec/imapd"\fP
3643    ** .pp
3644    ** \fBNote:\fP For this example to work you must be able to log in to the remote
3645    ** machine without having to enter a password.
3646    */
3647   {"umask", DT_NUM, R_NONE, UL &Umask, "0077" },
3648   /*
3649    ** .pp
3650    ** This sets the umask that will be used by Mutt-ng when creating all
3651    ** kinds of files. If \fIunset\fP, the default value is \fT077\fP.
3652    */
3653   {"use_8bitmime", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTUSE8BITMIME, "no" },
3654   /*
3655    ** .pp
3656    ** \fBWarning:\fP do not set this variable unless you are using a version
3657    ** of sendmail which supports the \fT-B8BITMIME\fP flag (such as sendmail
3658    ** 8.8.x) or in connection with the SMTP support via libESMTP.
3659    ** Otherwise you may not be able to send mail.
3660    ** .pp
3661    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will either invoke ``$$sendmail'' with the \fT-B8BITMIME\fP
3662    ** flag when sending 8-bit messages to enable ESMTP negotiation or tell
3663    ** libESMTP to do so.
3664    */
3665   {"use_domain", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTUSEDOMAIN, "yes" },
3666   /*
3667    ** .pp
3668    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will qualify all local addresses (ones without the
3669    ** @host portion) with the value of ``$$hostname''.  If \fIunset\fP, no
3670    ** addresses will be qualified.
3671    */
3672   {"use_from", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTUSEFROM, "yes" },
3673   /*
3674    ** .pp
3675    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will generate the ``\fTFrom:\fP'' header field when
3676    ** sending messages. If \fIunset\fP, no ``\fTFrom:\fP'' header field will be
3677    ** generated unless the user explicitly sets one using the ``$my_hdr''
3678    ** command.
3679    */
3680 #ifdef HAVE_LIBIDN
3681   {"use_idn", DT_BOOL, R_BOTH, OPTUSEIDN, "yes" },
3682   /*
3683    ** .pp
3684    ** Availability: IDN
3685    **
3686    ** .pp
3687    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will show you international domain names decoded.
3688    ** .pp
3689    ** \fBNote:\fP You can use IDNs for addresses even if this is \fIunset\fP.
3690    ** This variable only affects decoding.
3691    */
3692 #endif /* HAVE_LIBIDN */
3693 #ifdef HAVE_GETADDRINFO
3694   {"use_ipv6", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTUSEIPV6, "yes" },
3695   /*
3696    ** .pp
3697    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will look for IPv6 addresses of hosts it tries to
3698    ** contact.  If this option is \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will restrict itself to IPv4 addresses.
3699    ** Normally, the default should work.
3700    */
3701 #endif /* HAVE_GETADDRINFO */
3702   {"user_agent", DT_SYN, R_NONE, UL "agent_string", 0 },
3703   {"agent_string", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTXMAILER, "yes" },
3704   /*
3705    ** .pp
3706    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will add a ``\fTUser-Agent:\fP'' header to outgoing
3707    ** messages, indicating which version of Mutt-ng was used for composing
3708    ** them.
3709    */
3710   {"visual", DT_PATH, R_NONE, UL &Visual, "" },
3711   /*
3712    ** .pp
3713    ** Specifies the visual editor to invoke when the \fI~v\fP command is
3714    ** given in the builtin editor.
3715    */
3716   {"wait_key", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTWAITKEY, "yes" },
3717   /*
3718    ** .pp
3719    ** Controls whether Mutt-ng will ask you to press a key after \fIshell-
3720    ** escape\fP, \fIpipe-message\fP, \fIpipe-entry\fP, \fIprint-message\fP,
3721    ** and \fIprint-entry\fP commands.
3722    ** .pp
3723    ** It is also used when viewing attachments with ``$auto_view'', provided
3724    ** that the corresponding mailcap entry has a \fTneedsterminal\fP flag,
3725    ** and the external program is interactive.
3726    ** .pp
3727    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will always ask for a key. When \fIunset\fP, Mutt-ng will wait
3728    ** for a key only if the external command returned a non-zero status.
3729    */
3730   {"weed", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTWEED, "yes" },
3731   /*
3732    ** .pp
3733    ** When \fIset\fP, Mutt-ng will weed headers when displaying, forwarding,
3734    ** printing, or replying to messages.
3735    */
3736   {"wrap_search", DT_BOOL, R_NONE, OPTWRAPSEARCH, "yes" },
3737   /*
3738    ** .pp
3739    ** Controls whether searches wrap around the end of the mailbox.
3740    ** .pp
3741    ** When \fIset\fP, searches will wrap around the first (or last) message. When