typo
[~madcoder/pwqr.git] / Documentation / pwqr.adoc
1 Pthread WorkQueue Regulator
2 ===========================
3
4 The Pthread Workqueue Regulator is meant to help userland regulate thread
5 pools based on the actual amount of threads that are running, the capacity of
6 the machines, the amount of blocked threads ...
7
8 kernel-land design
9 ------------------
10
11 In the kernel, threads registered in the pwq regulator can be in 4 states:
12
13 blocked::
14         This is the state of threads that are curently blocked in a syscall.
15
16 running::
17         This is the state of threads that are either really running, or have
18         been preempted out by the kernel. In other words it's the number of
19         schedulable threads.
20
21 waiting::
22         This is the state of threads that are currently in a `PWQR_WAIT` call
23         from userspace (see `pwqr_ctl`) but that would not overcommit if
24         released by a `PWQR_WAKE` call.
25
26 quarantined::
27         This is the state of threads that are currently in a `PWQR_WAIT` call
28         from userspace (see `pwqr_ctl`) but that would overcommit if released
29         by a `PWQR_WAKE` call.
30 +
31 This state avoids waking a thread to force userland to "park" the thread, this
32 is racy, make the scheduler work for nothing useful.  Though if `PWQR_WAKE` is
33 called, quarantined threads are woken but with a `EDQUOT` errno set.
34
35 parked::
36         This is the state of threads currently in a `PWQR_PARK` call from
37         userspace (see `pwqr_ctl`).
38
39
40 The regulator tries to maintain the following invariant:
41
42         running + waiting == target_concurrency
43     ||  (running + waiting < target_concurrency && waiting > 0)
44
45 When `running + waiting` overcommits::
46         The kernel puts waiting threads into the quarantine, which doesn't
47         require anything from userland. It's something userland discovers only
48         when it needs a waiting thread, which may never happen.
49 +
50 If there are no waiting threads, then well, the workqueue overcommits, and
51 that's one of the TODO items at the moment (see Notes)
52
53 When `running + waiting` undercommits::
54         If waiting is non-zero then well, we don't care, it's that userland
55         actually doesn't need work to be performed.
56 +
57 If waiting is zero, then a parked thread (if such a thread) is woken up so
58 that userland has a chance to consume jobs.
59 +
60 Unparking threads only when waiting becomes zero avoid flip-flops when the job
61 flow is small, and that some of the running threads sometimes blocks (IOW
62 running sometimes decreases, making `running + waiting` be below target
63 concurrency for very small amount of time).
64
65 The regulation between running and waiting threads is left to userspace that
66 is a way better judge than kernel land that has absolutely no knowledge about
67 the current workload. Also, doing so means that when there are lots of jobs to
68 process and that the pool has a size that doesn't require more regulation,
69 kernel isn't called for mediation/regulation AT ALL.
70
71 NOTE: right now threads are unparked as soon as `running + waiting`
72 undercommit, and some delay should be applied to be sure it's not a really
73 short blocking syscall that made us undercommit.
74
75 NOTE: when we're overcommiting for a "long" time, userspace should be notified
76 in some way it should try to reduce its amount of running threads. Note that
77 the Apple implementation (before Lion at least) has the same issue. Though if
78 you imagine someone that spawns a zillion jobs that call very slow `msync()s`
79 or blocking `read()s` over the network, then that all those go back to running
80 state, the overcommit is huge.
81 A way to mitigate this atm is that when userspace belives the amount of
82 threads is abnormally high it should periodically try to PARK the threads. If
83 that blocks the thread, then it's that we were overcommiting. Note that it may
84 be the best solution rather than a kernel-side implementation. To be thought
85 over.
86
87 pwqr_create
88 -----------
89 SYNOPSIS
90 ~~~~~~~~
91
92         int pwqr_create(int flags);
93
94 DESCRIPTION
95 ~~~~~~~~~~~
96 This call returns a new PWQR file-descriptor. The regulator is initialized
97 with a concurrency corresponding to the number of online CPUs at the time of
98 the call, as would be returned by `sysconf(_SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN)`.
99
100 `flags`::
101         a mask of flags, currently only O_CLOEXEC.
102
103 RETURN VALUE
104 ~~~~~~~~~~~~
105 On success, this call return a nonnegative file descriptor.
106 On error, -1 is returned, and errno is set to indicate the error.
107
108 ERRORS
109 ~~~~~~
110 [EINVAL]::
111         Invalid value specified in flags
112 [ENFILE]::
113         The system limit on the total number of open files has been reached.
114 [ENOMEM]::
115         There was insufficient memory to create the kernel object.
116
117
118 pwqr_ctl
119 --------
120 SYNOPSIS
121 ~~~~~~~~
122
123         int pwqr_ctl(int pwqrfd, int op, int val, void *addr);
124
125
126 DESCRIPTION
127 ~~~~~~~~~~~
128
129 This system call performs control operations on the pwqr instance referred to
130 by the file descriptor `pwqrfd`.
131
132 Valid values for the `op` argument are:
133
134 `PWQR_GET_CONC`::
135         Requests the current concurrency level for this regulator.
136
137 `PWQR_SET_CONC`::
138         Modifies the current concurrency level for this regulator. The new
139         value is passed as the `val` argument. The requests returns the old
140         concurrency level on success.
141 +
142         A zero or negative value for `val` means 'automatic' and is recomputed
143         as the current number of online CPUs as
144         `sysconf(_SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN)` would return.
145
146 `PWQR_REGISTER`::
147         Registers the calling thread to be taken into account by the pool
148         regulator. If the thread is already registered into another regulator,
149         then it's automatically unregistered from it.
150
151 `PWQR_UNREGISTER`::
152         Deregisters the calling thread from the pool regulator.
153
154 `PWQR_WAKE`::
155         Tries to wake `val` threads from the pool. This is done according to
156         the current concurrency level not to overcommit. On success, the
157         number of woken threads is returned, it can be 0.
158
159 `PWQR_WAKE_OC`::
160         Tries to wake `val` threads from the pool. This is done bypassing the
161         current concurrency level (`OC` stands for `OVERCOMMIT`). On success,
162         the number of woken threads is returned, it can be 0.
163
164 `PWQR_WAIT`::
165         Puts the thread to wait for a future `PWQR_WAKE` command. If this
166         thread must be parked to maintain concurrency below the target, then
167         the call blocks with no further ado.
168 +
169 If the concurrency level is below the target, then the kernel checks if the
170 address `addr` still contains the value `val` (in the fashion of `futex(2)`).
171 If it doesn't then the call doesn't block. Else the calling thread is blocked
172 until a `PWQR_WAKE` command is received.
173
174 `PWQR_PARK`::
175         Puts the thread in park mode. Those are spare threads to avoid
176         cloning/exiting threads when the pool is regulated. Those threads are
177         released by the regulator only, and can only be woken from userland
178         with the `PWQR_WAKE_OC` command, and once all waiting threads have
179         been woken.
180 +
181 The call blocks until an overcommiting wake requires the thread, or the kernel
182 regulator needs to grow the pool with new running threads.
183
184 RETURN VALUE
185 ~~~~~~~~~~~~
186 When successful `pwqr_ctl` returns a nonnegative value.
187 On error, -1 is returned, and errno is set to indicate the error.
188
189 ERRORS
190 ~~~~~~
191 [EBADF]::
192         `pwqfd` is not a valid file descriptor.
193
194 [EBADFD]::
195         `pwqfd` is a valid pwqr file descriptor but is in a broken state: it
196         has been closed while other threads were in a pwqr_ctl call.
197 +
198 NOTE: this is due to the current implementation and would probably not be here
199 with a real syscall.
200
201 [EFAULT]::
202          Error in reading value from `addr` from userspace.
203
204 [EINVAL]::
205         TODO
206
207 Errors specific to `PWQR_REGISTER`:
208
209 [ENOMEM]::
210         There was insufficient memory to perform the operation.
211
212 Errors specific to `PWQR_WAIT`:
213
214 [EWOULDBLOCK]::
215         When the kernel evaluated if `addr` still contained `val` it didn't.
216         This works like `futex(2)`.
217
218 Errors specific to `PWQR_WAIT` and `PWQR_PARK`:
219
220 [EINTR]::
221         The call was interrupted by a syscall (note that sometimes the kernel
222         masks this fact when it has more important "errors" to report like
223         `EDQUOT`).
224 [EDQUOT]::
225         The thread has been woken by a `PWQR_WAKE` or `PWQR_WAKE_OC` call, but
226         is overcommiting.
227