Rocco Rutte:
[apps/madmutt.git] / doc / manual.txt
1
2                                   T\bTh\bhe\be M\bMu\but\btt\bt-\b-n\bng\bg E\bE-\b-M\bMa\bai\bil\bl C\bCl\bli\bie\ben\bnt\bt
3
4                         by Michael Elkins <me@cs.hmc.edu> and others.
5
6                                         version devel
7
8                                           A\bAb\bbs\bst\btr\bra\bac\bct\bt
9
10             ``All mail clients suck.  This one just sucks less.'' -me, circa 1995
11
12        _\b1_\b.  _\bI_\bn_\bt_\br_\bo_\bd_\bu_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn
13
14        M\bMu\but\btt\bt-\b-n\bng\bg is a small but very powerful text-based MIME mail client.  Mutt-ng is
15        highly configurable, and is well suited to the mail power user with advanced
16        features like key bindings, keyboard macros, mail threading, regular expression
17        searches and a powerful pattern matching language for selecting groups of mes-
18        sages.
19
20        This documentation additionally contains documentation to M\bMu\but\btt\bt-\b-N\bNG\bG, a fork from
21        Mutt with the goal to fix all the little annoyances of Mutt, to integrate all
22        the Mutt patches that are floating around in the web, and to add other new fea-
23        tures. Features specific to Mutt-ng will be discussed in an extra section.
24        Don't be confused when most of the documentation talk about Mutt and not Mutt-
25        ng, Mutt-ng contains all Mutt features, plus many more.
26
27        _\b1_\b._\b1  _\bM_\bu_\bt_\bt_\b-_\bn_\bg _\bH_\bo_\bm_\be _\bP_\ba_\bg_\be
28
29        http://www.muttng.org
30
31        _\b1_\b._\b2  _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bL_\bi_\bs_\bt_\bs
32
33           +\bo mutt-ng-users@lists.berlios.de -- This is where the mutt-ng user support
34             happens.
35
36           +\bo mutt-ng-devel@lists.berlios.de -- The development mailing list for mutt-ng
37
38        _\b1_\b._\b3  _\bS_\bo_\bf_\bt_\bw_\ba_\br_\be _\bD_\bi_\bs_\bt_\br_\bi_\bb_\bu_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn _\bS_\bi_\bt_\be_\bs
39
40        So far, there are no official releases of Mutt-ng, but you can download daily
41        snapshots from http://mutt-ng.berlios.de/snapshots/
42
43        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                     1
44
45        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                     2
46
47        _\b1_\b._\b4  _\bI_\bR_\bC
48
49        Visit channel _\b#_\bm_\bu_\bt_\bt_\bn_\bg on irc.freenode.net (www.freenode.net) to chat with other
50        people interested in Mutt-ng.
51
52        _\b1_\b._\b5  _\bW_\be_\bb_\bl_\bo_\bg
53
54        If you want to read fresh news about the latest development in Mutt-ng, and get
55        informed about stuff like interesting, Mutt-ng-related articles and packages
56        for your favorite distribution, you can read and/or subscribe to our Mutt-ng
57        development weblog.
58
59        _\b1_\b._\b6  _\bC_\bo_\bp_\by_\br_\bi_\bg_\bh_\bt
60
61        Mutt is Copyright (C) 1996-2000 Michael R. Elkins <me@cs.hmc.edu> and others
62
63        This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under
64        the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software
65        Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later ver-
66        sion.
67
68        This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY
69        WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A
70        PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU General Public License for more details.
71
72        You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with
73        this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple
74        Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111, USA.
75
76        _\b2_\b.  _\bG_\be_\bt_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bS_\bt_\ba_\br_\bt_\be_\bd
77
78        This section is intended as a brief overview of how to use Mutt-ng.  There are
79        many other features which are described elsewhere in the manual.  <-- There is
80        even more information available in the Mutt FAQ and various web pages.  See the
81        Mutt Page for more details.  -->
82
83        The key bindings described in this section are the defaults as distributed.
84        Your local system administrator may have altered the defaults for your site.
85        You can always type ``?'' in any menu to display the current bindings.
86
87        The first thing you need to do is invoke mutt-ng simply by typing muttng at the
88        command line.  There are various command-line options, see either the muttng
89        man page or the _\br_\be_\bf_\be_\br_\be_\bn_\bc_\be (section 6.1  , page 62).
90
91        If you have used mutt in the past the easiest thing to have a proper configura-
92        tion file is to source  /.muttrc in  /.muttngrc.
93
94        _\b2_\b._\b1  _\bM_\bo_\bv_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bA_\br_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bd _\bi_\bn _\bM_\be_\bn_\bu_\bs
95
96        Information is presented in menus, very similar to ELM.  Here is a table show-
97        ing the common keys used to navigate menus in Mutt.
98
99        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                     3
100
101             j or Down       next-entry      move to the next entry
102             k or Up         previous-entry  move to the previous entry
103             z or PageDn     page-down       go to the next page
104             Z or PageUp     page-up         go to the previous page
105             = or Home       first-entry     jump to the first entry
106             * or End        last-entry      jump to the last entry
107             q               quit            exit the current menu
108             ?               help            list all key bindings for the current menu
109
110        _\b2_\b._\b2  _\bE_\bd_\bi_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bI_\bn_\bp_\bu_\bt _\bF_\bi_\be_\bl_\bd_\bs
111
112        Mutt-ng has a builtin line editor which is used as the primary way to input
113        textual data such as email addresses or filenames.  The keys used to move
114        around while editing are very similar to those of Emacs.
115
116             ^A or <Home>    bol             move to the start of the line
117             ^B or <Left>    backward-char   move back one char
118             Esc B          backward-word  move back one word
119             ^D or <Delete>  delete-char     delete the char under the cursor
120             ^E or <End>     eol             move to the end of the line
121             ^F or <Right>   forward-char    move forward one char
122             Esc F          forward-word   move forward one word
123             <Tab>           complete        complete filename or alias
124             ^T              complete-query  complete address with query
125             ^K              kill-eol        delete to the end of the line
126             ESC d          kill-eow  delete to the end ot the word
127             ^W              kill-word       kill the word in front of the cursor
128             ^U              kill-line       delete entire line
129             ^V              quote-char      quote the next typed key
130             <Up>            history-up      recall previous string from history
131             <Down>          history-down    recall next string from history
132             <BackSpace>     backspace       kill the char in front of the cursor
133             Esc u          upcase-word    convert word to upper case
134             Esc l          downcase-word  convert word to lower case
135             Esc c          capitalize-word capitalize the word
136             ^G              n/a             abort
137             <Return>        n/a             finish editing
138
139        You can remap the _\be_\bd_\bi_\bt_\bo_\br functions using the _\bb_\bi_\bn_\bd (section 3.3  , page 17) com-
140        mand.  For example, to make the _\bD_\be_\bl_\be_\bt_\be key delete the character in front of the
141        cursor rather than under, you could use
142
143        bind editor <delete> backspace
144
145        _\b2_\b._\b3  _\bR_\be_\ba_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl _\b- _\bT_\bh_\be _\bI_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx _\ba_\bn_\bd _\bP_\ba_\bg_\be_\br
146
147        Similar to many other mail clients, there are two modes in which mail is read
148        in Mutt-ng.  The first is the index of messages in the mailbox, which is called
149        the ``index'' in Mutt.  The second mode is the display of the message contents.
150        This is called the ``pager.''
151
152        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                     4
153
154        The next few sections describe the functions provided in each of these modes.
155
156        _\b2_\b._\b3_\b._\b1  _\bT_\bh_\be _\bM_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\bI_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx
157
158             c               change to a different mailbox
159             ESC c           change to a folder in read-only mode
160             C               copy the current message to another mailbox
161             ESC C           decode a message and copy it to a folder
162             ESC s           decode a message and save it to a folder
163             D               delete messages matching a pattern
164             d               delete the current message
165             F               mark as important
166             l               show messages matching a pattern
167             N               mark message as new
168             o               change the current sort method
169             O               reverse sort the mailbox
170             q               save changes and exit
171             s               save-message
172             T               tag messages matching a pattern
173             t               toggle the tag on a message
174             ESC t           toggle tag on entire message thread
175             U               undelete messages matching a pattern
176             u               undelete-message
177             v               view-attachments
178             x               abort changes and exit
179             <Return>        display-message
180             <Tab>           jump to the next new message
181             @               show the author's full e-mail address
182             $               save changes to mailbox
183             /               search
184             ESC /           search-reverse
185             ^L              clear and redraw the screen
186             ^T              untag messages matching a pattern
187
188        _\b2_\b._\b3_\b._\b1_\b._\b1  _\bS_\bt_\ba_\bt_\bu_\bs _\bF_\bl_\ba_\bg_\bs
189
190        In addition to who sent the message and the subject, a short summary of the
191        disposition of each message is printed beside the message number.  Zero or more
192        of the following ``flags'' may appear, which mean:
193
194              D
195                    message is deleted (is marked for deletion)
196
197              d
198                    message have attachments marked for deletion
199
200              K
201                    contains a PGP public key
202
203              N
204                    message is new
205
206        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                     5
207
208              O
209                    message is old
210
211              P
212                    message is PGP encrypted
213
214              r
215                    message has been replied to
216
217              S
218                    message is signed, and the signature is succesfully verified
219
220              s
221                    message is signed
222
223              !
224                    message is flagged
225
226              *
227                    message is tagged
228
229        Some of the status flags can be turned on or off using
230
231           +\bo s\bse\bet\bt-\b-f\bfl\bla\bag\bg (default: w)
232
233           +\bo c\bcl\ble\bea\bar\br-\b-f\bfl\bla\bag\bg (default: W)
234
235        Furthermore, the following flags reflect who the message is addressed to.  They
236        can be customized with the _\b$_\bt_\bo_\b__\bc_\bh_\ba_\br_\bs (section 6.3.315  , page 142) variable.
237
238              +
239                    message is to you and you only
240
241              T
242                    message is to you, but also to or cc'ed to others
243
244              C
245                    message is cc'ed to you
246
247              F
248                    message is from you
249
250              L
251                    message is sent to a subscribed mailing list
252
253        _\b2_\b._\b3_\b._\b2  _\bT_\bh_\be _\bP_\ba_\bg_\be_\br
254
255        By default, Mutt-ng uses its builtin pager to display the body of messages.
256        The pager is very similar to the Unix program _\bl_\be_\bs_\bs though not nearly as fea-
257        tureful.
258
259        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                     6
260
261             <Return>        go down one line
262             <Space>         display the next page (or next message if at the end of a message)
263             -               go back to the previous page
264             n               search for next match
265             S               skip beyond quoted text
266             T               toggle display of quoted text
267             ?               show key bindings
268             /               search for a regular expression (pattern)
269             ESC /           search backwards for a regular expression
270             \               toggle search pattern coloring
271             ^               jump to the top of the message
272
273        In addition, many of the functions from the _\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx are available in the pager,
274        such as _\bd_\be_\bl_\be_\bt_\be_\b-_\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be or _\bc_\bo_\bp_\by_\b-_\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be (this is one advantage over using an
275        external pager to view messages).
276
277        Also, the internal pager supports a couple other advanced features. For one, it
278        will accept and translate the ``standard'' nroff sequences for bold and under-
279        line. These sequences are a series of either the letter, backspace (^H), the
280        letter again for bold or the letter, backspace, ``_'' for denoting underline.
281        Mutt-ng will attempt to display these in bold and underline respectively if
282        your terminal supports them. If not, you can use the bold and underline _\bc_\bo_\bl_\bo_\br
283        (section 3.7  , page 21) objects to specify a color or mono attribute for them.
284
285        Additionally, the internal pager supports the ANSI escape sequences for charac-
286        ter attributes.  Mutt-ng translates them into the correct color and character
287        settings.  The sequences Mutt-ng supports are:
288
289             ESC [ Ps;Ps;Ps;...;Ps m
290             where Ps =
291             0    All Attributes Off
292             1    Bold on
293             4    Underline on
294             5    Blink on
295             7    Reverse video on
296             3x   Foreground color is x
297             4x   Background color is x
298
299             Colors are
300             0    black
301             1    red
302             2    green
303             3    yellow
304             4    blue
305             5    magenta
306             6    cyan
307             7    white
308
309        Mutt-ng uses these attributes for handling text/enriched messages, and they can
310        also be used by an external _\ba_\bu_\bt_\bo_\bv_\bi_\be_\bw (section 5.4  , page 60) script for high-
311        lighting purposes.  N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: If you change the colors for your display, for
312
313        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                     7
314
315        example by changing the color associated with color2 for your xterm, then that
316        color will be used instead of green.
317
318        _\b2_\b._\b3_\b._\b3  _\bT_\bh_\br_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\bd _\bM_\bo_\bd_\be
319
320        When the mailbox is _\bs_\bo_\br_\bt_\be_\bd (section 6.3.287  , page 133) by _\bt_\bh_\br_\be_\ba_\bd_\bs, there are
321        a few additional functions available in the _\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx and _\bp_\ba_\bg_\be_\br modes.
322
323             ^D      delete-thread           delete all messages in the current thread
324             ^U      undelete-thread         undelete all messages in the current thread
325             ^N      next-thread             jump to the start of the next thread
326             ^P      previous-thread         jump to the start of the previous thread
327             ^R      read-thread             mark the current thread as read
328             ESC d   delete-subthread        delete all messages in the current subthread
329             ESC u   undelete-subthread      undelete all messages in the current subthread
330             ESC n   next-subthread          jump to the start of the next subthread
331             ESC p   previous-subthread      jump to the start of the previous subthread
332             ESC r   read-subthread          mark the current subthread as read
333             ESC t   tag-thread              toggle the tag on the current thread
334             ESC v     collapse-thread          toggle collapse for the current thread
335             ESC V     collapse-all        toggle collapse for all threads
336             P       parent-message          jump to parent message in thread
337
338        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: Collapsing a thread displays only the first message in the thread and
339        hides the others. This is useful when threads contain so many messages that you
340        can only see a handful of threads on the screen. See %M in _\b$_\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt (sec-
341        tion 6.3.108  , page 89).  For example, you could use "%?M?(#%03M)&(%4l)?" in
342        _\b$_\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt (section 6.3.108  , page 89) to optionally display the number of
343        hidden messages if the thread is collapsed.
344
345        See also: _\b$_\bs_\bt_\br_\bi_\bc_\bt_\b__\bt_\bh_\br_\be_\ba_\bd_\bs (section 6.3.304  , page 139).
346
347        _\b2_\b._\b3_\b._\b4  _\bM_\bi_\bs_\bc_\be_\bl_\bl_\ba_\bn_\be_\bo_\bu_\bs _\bF_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn_\bs
348
349        c\bcr\bre\bea\bat\bte\be-\b-a\bal\bli\bia\bas\bs
350         (default: a)
351
352        Creates a new alias based upon the current message (or prompts for a new one).
353        Once editing is complete, an _\ba_\bl_\bi_\ba_\bs (section 3.2  , page 16) command is added to
354        the file specified by the _\b$_\ba_\bl_\bi_\ba_\bs_\b__\bf_\bi_\bl_\be (section 6.3.3  , page 65) variable for
355        future use. N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: Specifying an _\b$_\ba_\bl_\bi_\ba_\bs_\b__\bf_\bi_\bl_\be (section 6.3.3  , page 65) does not
356        add the aliases specified there-in, you must also _\bs_\bo_\bu_\br_\bc_\be (section 3.26  , page
357        32) the file.
358
359        c\bch\bhe\bec\bck\bk-\b-t\btr\bra\bad\bdi\bit\bti\bio\bon\bna\bal\bl-\b-p\bpg\bgp\bp
360         (default: ESC P)
361
362        This function will search the current message for content signed or encrypted
363        with PGP the "traditional" way, that is, without proper MIME tagging.  Techni-
364        cally, this function will temporarily change the MIME content types of the body
365        parts containing PGP data; this is similar to the _\be_\bd_\bi_\bt_\b-_\bt_\by_\bp_\be (section 2.3.4  ,
366        page 8) function's effect.
367
368        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                     8
369
370        d\bdi\bis\bsp\bpl\bla\bay\by-\b-t\bto\bog\bgg\bgl\ble\be-\b-w\bwe\bee\bed\bd
371         (default: h)
372
373        Toggles the weeding of message header fields specified by _\bi_\bg_\bn_\bo_\br_\be (section
374        3.8  , page 23) commands.
375
376        e\bed\bdi\bit\bt
377         (default: e)
378
379        This command (available in the ``index'' and ``pager'') allows you to edit the
380        raw current message as it's present in the mail folder.  After you have fin-
381        ished editing, the changed message will be appended to the current folder, and
382        the original message will be marked for deletion.
383
384        e\bed\bdi\bit\bt-\b-t\bty\byp\bpe\be
385
386        (default: ^E on the attachment menu, and in the pager and index menus; ^T on
387        the compose menu)
388
389        This command is used to temporarily edit an attachment's content type to fix,
390        for instance, bogus character set parameters.  When invoked from the index or
391        from the pager, you'll have the opportunity to edit the top-level attachment's
392        content type.  On the _\ba_\bt_\bt_\ba_\bc_\bh_\bm_\be_\bn_\bt _\bm_\be_\bn_\bu (section 5.1.2  , page 53), you can
393        change any attachment's content type. These changes are not persistent, and get
394        lost upon changing folders.
395
396        Note that this command is also available on the _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bp_\bo_\bs_\be _\bm_\be_\bn_\bu (section 5.1.3  ,
397        page 53).  There, it's used to fine-tune the properties of attachments you are
398        going to send.
399
400        e\ben\bnt\bte\ber\br-\b-c\bco\bom\bmm\bma\ban\bnd\bd
401         (default: ``:'')
402
403        This command is used to execute any command you would normally put in a config-
404        uration file.  A common use is to check the settings of variables, or in con-
405        junction with _\bm_\ba_\bc_\br_\bo_\bs (section 3.6  , page 20) to change settings on the fly.
406
407        e\bex\bxt\btr\bra\bac\bct\bt-\b-k\bke\bey\bys\bs
408         (default: ^K)
409
410        This command extracts PGP public keys from the current or tagged message(s) and
411        adds them to your PGP public key ring.
412
413        f\bfo\bor\brg\bge\bet\bt-\b-p\bpa\bas\bss\bsp\bph\bhr\bra\bas\bse\be
414         (default: ^F)
415
416        This command wipes the passphrase(s) from memory. It is useful, if you mis-
417        spelled the passphrase.
418
419        l\bli\bis\bst\bt-\b-r\bre\bep\bpl\bly\by
420         (default: L)
421
422        Reply to the current or tagged message(s) by extracting any addresses which
423
424        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                     9
425
426        match the regular expressions given by the _\bl_\bi_\bs_\bt_\bs _\bo_\br _\bs_\bu_\bb_\bs_\bc_\br_\bi_\bb_\be (section 3.10  ,
427        page 24) commands, but also honor any Mail-Followup-To header(s) if the
428        _\b$_\bh_\bo_\bn_\bo_\br_\b__\bf_\bo_\bl_\bl_\bo_\bw_\bu_\bp_\b__\bt_\bo (section 6.3.87  , page 84) configuration variable is set.
429        Using this when replying to messages posted to mailing lists helps avoid dupli-
430        cate copies being sent to the author of the message you are replying to.
431
432        p\bpi\bip\bpe\be-\b-m\bme\bes\bss\bsa\bag\bge\be
433         (default: |)
434
435        Asks for an external Unix command and pipes the current or tagged message(s) to
436        it.  The variables _\b$_\bp_\bi_\bp_\be_\b__\bd_\be_\bc_\bo_\bd_\be (section 6.3.198  , page 113), _\b$_\bp_\bi_\bp_\be_\b__\bs_\bp_\bl_\bi_\bt
437        (section 6.3.200  , page 113), _\b$_\bp_\bi_\bp_\be_\b__\bs_\be_\bp (section 6.3.199  , page 113) and
438        _\b$_\bw_\ba_\bi_\bt_\b__\bk_\be_\by (section 6.3.327  , page 144) control the exact behavior of this
439        function.
440
441        r\bre\bes\bse\ben\bnd\bd-\b-m\bme\bes\bss\bsa\bag\bge\be
442         (default: ESC e)
443
444        With resend-message, mutt takes the current message as a template for a new
445        message.  This function is best described as "recall from arbitrary folders".
446        It can conveniently be used to forward MIME messages while preserving the orig-
447        inal mail structure. Note that the amount of headers included here depends on
448        the value of the _\b$_\bw_\be_\be_\bd (section 6.3.328  , page 144) variable.
449
450        This function is also available from the attachment menu. You can use this to
451        easily resend a message which was included with a bounce message as a mes-
452        sage/rfc822 body part.
453
454        s\bsh\bhe\bel\bll\bl-\b-e\bes\bsc\bca\bap\bpe\be
455         (default: !)
456
457        Asks for an external Unix command and executes it.  The _\b$_\bw_\ba_\bi_\bt_\b__\bk_\be_\by (section
458        6.3.327  , page 144) can be used to control whether Mutt-ng will wait for a key
459        to be pressed when the command returns (presumably to let the user read the
460        output of the command), based on the return status of the named command.
461
462        t\bto\bog\bgg\bgl\ble\be-\b-q\bqu\buo\bot\bte\bed\bd
463         (default: T)
464
465        The _\bp_\ba_\bg_\be_\br uses the _\b$_\bq_\bu_\bo_\bt_\be_\b__\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp (section 6.3.223  , page 119) variable to
466        detect quoted text when displaying the body of the message.  This function tog-
467        gles the display of the quoted material in the message.  It is particularly
468        useful when are interested in just the response and there is a large amount of
469        quoted text in the way.
470
471        s\bsk\bki\bip\bp-\b-q\bqu\buo\bot\bte\bed\bd
472         (default: S)
473
474        This function will go to the next line of non-quoted text which come after a
475        line of quoted text in the internal pager.
476
477        _\b2_\b._\b4  _\bS_\be_\bn_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl
478
479        The following bindings are available in the _\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx for sending messages.
480
481        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    10
482
483             m       compose         compose a new message
484             r       reply           reply to sender
485             g       group-reply     reply to all recipients
486             L       list-reply      reply to mailing list address
487             f       forward         forward message
488             b       bounce          bounce (remail) message
489             ESC k   mail-key        mail a PGP public key to someone
490
491        Bouncing a message sends the message as is to the recipient you specify.  For-
492        warding a message allows you to add comments or modify the message you are for-
493        warding.  These items are discussed in greater detail in the next chapter
494        _\b`_\b`_\bF_\bo_\br_\bw_\ba_\br_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg _\ba_\bn_\bd _\bB_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl_\b'_\b' (section 2.5  , page 13).
495
496        Mutt-ng will then enter the _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bp_\bo_\bs_\be menu and prompt you for the recipients to
497        place on the ``To:'' header field.  Next, it will ask you for the ``Subject:''
498        field for the message, providing a default if you are replying to or forwarding
499        a message.  See also _\b$_\ba_\bs_\bk_\bc_\bc (section 6.3.10  , page 66), _\b$_\ba_\bs_\bk_\bb_\bc_\bc (section
500        6.3.9  , page 66), _\b$_\ba_\bu_\bt_\bo_\be_\bd_\bi_\bt (section 6.3.17  , page 69), _\b$_\bb_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bc_\be (section
501        6.3.20  , page 69), and _\b$_\bf_\ba_\bs_\bt_\b__\br_\be_\bp_\bl_\by (section 6.3.59  , page 78) for changing
502        how Mutt asks these questions.
503
504        Mutt will then automatically start your _\b$_\be_\bd_\bi_\bt_\bo_\br (section 6.3.55  , page 77) on
505        the message body.  If the _\b$_\be_\bd_\bi_\bt_\b__\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\bs (section 6.3.54  , page 77) variable is
506        set, the headers will be at the top of the message in your editor.  Any mes-
507        sages you are replying to will be added in sort order to the message, with
508        appropriate _\b$_\ba_\bt_\bt_\br_\bi_\bb_\bu_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn (section 6.3.15  , page 68), _\b$_\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bn_\bt_\b__\bs_\bt_\br_\bi_\bn_\bg (section
509        6.3.107  , page 89) and _\b$_\bp_\bo_\bs_\bt_\b__\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bn_\bt_\b__\bs_\bt_\br_\bi_\bn_\bg (section 6.3.210  , page 116).
510        When forwarding a message, if the _\b$_\bm_\bi_\bm_\be_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bw_\ba_\br_\bd (section 6.3.134  , page 97)
511        variable is unset, a copy of the forwarded message will be included.  If you
512        have specified a _\b$_\bs_\bi_\bg_\bn_\ba_\bt_\bu_\br_\be (section 6.3.257  , page 127), it will be appended
513        to the message.
514
515        Once you have finished editing the body of your mail message, you are returned
516        to the _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bp_\bo_\bs_\be menu.  The following options are available:
517
518        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    11
519
520             a       attach-file             attach a file
521             A    attach-message      attach message(s) to the message
522             ESC k   attach-key              attach a PGP public key
523             d       edit-description        edit description on attachment
524             D       detach-file             detach a file
525             t       edit-to                 edit the To field
526             ESC f   edit-from               edit the From field
527             r       edit-reply-to           edit the Reply-To field
528             c       edit-cc                 edit the Cc field
529             b       edit-bcc                edit the Bcc field
530             y       send-message            send the message
531             s       edit-subject            edit the Subject
532             S       smime-menu              select S/MIME options
533             f       edit-fcc                specify an ``Fcc'' mailbox
534             p       pgp-menu                select PGP options
535             P       postpone-message        postpone this message until later
536             q       quit                    quit (abort) sending the message
537             w    write-fcc      write the message to a folder
538             i       ispell                  check spelling (if available on your system)
539             ^F      forget-passphrase       wipe passphrase(s) from memory
540
541        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: The attach-message function will prompt you for a folder to attach mes-
542        sages from. You can now tag messages in that folder and they will be attached
543        to the message you are sending. Note that certain operations like composing a
544        new mail, replying, forwarding, etc. are not permitted when you are in that
545        folder. The %r in _\b$_\bs_\bt_\ba_\bt_\bu_\bs_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt (section 6.3.301  , page 137) will change to a
546        'A' to indicate that you are in attach-message mode.
547
548        _\b2_\b._\b4_\b._\b1  _\bE_\bd_\bi_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bt_\bh_\be _\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br
549
550        When editing the header of your outgoing message, there are a couple of special
551        features available.
552
553        If you specify
554
555        Fcc: _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be
556
557        Mutt will pick up _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be just as if you had used the _\be_\bd_\bi_\bt_\b-_\bf_\bc_\bc function in the
558        _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bp_\bo_\bs_\be menu.
559
560        You can also attach files to your message by specifying
561
562        Attach: _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be  [ _\bd_\be_\bs_\bc_\br_\bi_\bp_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn ]
563
564        where _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be is the file to attach and _\bd_\be_\bs_\bc_\br_\bi_\bp_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn is an optional string to
565        use as the description of the attached file.
566
567        When replying to messages, if you remove the _\bI_\bn_\b-_\bR_\be_\bp_\bl_\by_\b-_\bT_\bo_\b: field from the header
568        field, Mutt will not generate a _\bR_\be_\bf_\be_\br_\be_\bn_\bc_\be_\bs_\b: field, which allows you to create a
569        new message thread.
570
571        Also see _\be_\bd_\bi_\bt_\b__\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\bs (section 6.3.54  , page 77).
572
573        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    12
574
575        _\b2_\b._\b4_\b._\b2  _\bU_\bs_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bM_\bu_\bt_\bt _\bw_\bi_\bt_\bh _\bP_\bG_\bP
576
577        If you want to use PGP, you can specify
578
579        Pgp: [ E | S | S_\b<_\bi_\bd_\b> ]
580
581        ``E'' encrypts, ``S'' signs and ``S<id>'' signs with the given key, setting
582        _\b$_\bp_\bg_\bp_\b__\bs_\bi_\bg_\bn_\b__\ba_\bs (section 6.3.190  , page 111) permanently.
583
584        If you have told mutt to PGP encrypt a message, it will guide you through a key
585        selection process when you try to send the message.  Mutt will not ask you any
586        questions about keys which have a certified user ID matching one of the message
587        recipients' mail addresses.  However, there may be situations in which there
588        are several keys, weakly certified user ID fields, or where no matching keys
589        can be found.
590
591        In these cases, you are dropped into a menu with a list of keys from which you
592        can select one.  When you quit this menu, or mutt can't find any matching keys,
593        you are prompted for a user ID.  You can, as usually, abort this prompt using
594        ^G.  When you do so, mutt will return to the compose screen.
595
596        Once you have successfully finished the key selection, the message will be
597        encrypted using the selected public keys, and sent out.
598
599        Most fields of the entries in the key selection menu (see also _\b$_\bp_\bg_\bp_\b__\be_\bn_\bt_\br_\by_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\b-
600        _\bm_\ba_\bt (section 6.3.177  , page 108)) have obvious meanings.  But some explana-
601        tions on the capabilities, flags, and validity fields are in order.
602
603        The flags sequence (%f) will expand to one of the following flags:
604
605             R            The key has been revoked and can't be used.
606             X            The key is expired and can't be used.
607             d            You have marked the key as disabled.
608             c            There are unknown critical self-signature
609                          packets.
610
611        The capabilities field (%c) expands to a two-character sequence representing a
612        key's capabilities.  The first character gives the key's encryption capabili-
613        ties: A minus sign (-\b-) means that the key cannot be used for encryption.  A dot
614        (.\b.) means that it's marked as a signature key in one of the user IDs, but may
615        also be used for encryption.  The letter e\be indicates that this key can be used
616        for encryption.
617
618        The second character indicates the key's signing capabilities.  Once again, a
619        ``-\b-'' implies ``not for signing'', ``.\b.'' implies that the key is marked as an
620        encryption key in one of the user-ids, and ``s\bs'' denotes a key which can be
621        used for signing.
622
623        Finally, the validity field (%t) indicates how well-certified a user-id is.  A
624        question mark (?\b?) indicates undefined validity, a minus character (-\b-) marks an
625        untrusted association, a space character means a partially trusted association,
626        and a plus character (+\b+) indicates complete validity.
627
628        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    13
629
630        _\b2_\b._\b4_\b._\b3  _\bS_\be_\bn_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg _\ba_\bn_\bo_\bn_\by_\bm_\bo_\bu_\bs _\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be_\bs _\bv_\bi_\ba _\bm_\bi_\bx_\bm_\ba_\bs_\bt_\be_\br_\b.
631
632        You may also have configured mutt to co-operate with Mixmaster, an anonymous
633        remailer.  Mixmaster permits you to send your messages anonymously using a
634        chain of remailers. Mixmaster support in mutt is for mixmaster version 2.04
635        (beta 45 appears to be the latest) and 2.03.  It does not support earlier ver-
636        sions or the later so-called version 3 betas, of which the latest appears to be
637        called 2.9b23.
638
639        To use it, you'll have to obey certain restrictions.  Most important, you can-
640        not use the Cc and Bcc headers.  To tell Mutt to use mixmaster, you have to
641        select a remailer chain, using the mix function on the compose menu.
642
643        The chain selection screen is divided into two parts.  In the (larger) upper
644        part, you get a list of remailers you may use.  In the lower part, you see the
645        currently selected chain of remailers.
646
647        You can navigate in the chain using the chain-prev and chain-next functions,
648        which are by default bound to the left and right arrows and to the h and l keys
649        (think vi keyboard bindings).  To insert a remailer at the current chain posi-
650        tion, use the insert function.  To append a remailer behind the current chain
651        position, use select-entry or append.  You can also delete entries from the
652        chain, using the corresponding function.  Finally, to abandon your changes,
653        leave the menu, or accept them pressing (by default) the Return key.
654
655        Note that different remailers do have different capabilities, indicated in the
656        %c entry of the remailer menu lines (see _\b$_\bm_\bi_\bx_\b__\be_\bn_\bt_\br_\by_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt (section 6.3.137  ,
657        page 98)).  Most important is the ``middleman'' capability, indicated by a cap-
658        ital ``M'': This means that the remailer in question cannot be used as the
659        final element of a chain, but will only forward messages to other mixmaster
660        remailers.  For details on the other capabilities, please have a look at the
661        mixmaster documentation.
662
663        _\b2_\b._\b5  _\bF_\bo_\br_\bw_\ba_\br_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg _\ba_\bn_\bd _\bB_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl
664
665        Bouncing and forwarding let you send an existing message to recipients that you
666        specify.  Bouncing a message uses the _\bs_\be_\bn_\bd_\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl (section 6.3.245  , page 124)
667        command to send a copy to alternative addresses as if they were the message's
668        original recipients.  Forwarding a message, on the other hand, allows you to
669        modify the message before it is resent (for example, by adding your own com-
670        ments).
671
672        The following keys are bound by default:
673
674             f       forward         forward message
675             b       bounce          bounce (remail) message
676
677        Forwarding can be done by including the original message in the new message's
678        body (surrounded by indicating lines) or including it as a MIME attachment,
679        depending on the value of the _\b$_\bm_\bi_\bm_\be_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bw_\ba_\br_\bd (section 6.3.134  , page 97) vari-
680        able.  Decoding of attachments, like in the pager, can be controlled by the
681        _\b$_\bf_\bo_\br_\bw_\ba_\br_\bd_\b__\bd_\be_\bc_\bo_\bd_\be (section 6.3.68  , page 81) and _\b$_\bm_\bi_\bm_\be_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bw_\ba_\br_\bd_\b__\bd_\be_\bc_\bo_\bd_\be (section
682
683        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    14
684
685        6.3.135  , page 97) variables, respectively.  The desired forwarding format may
686        depend on the content, therefore _\b$_\bm_\bi_\bm_\be_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bw_\ba_\br_\bd is a quadoption which, for exam-
687        ple, can be set to ``ask-no''.
688
689        The inclusion of headers is controlled by the current setting of the _\b$_\bw_\be_\be_\bd
690        (section 6.3.328  , page 144) variable, unless _\bm_\bi_\bm_\be_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bw_\ba_\br_\bd (section 6.3.134  ,
691        page 97) is set.
692
693        Editing the message to forward follows the same procedure as sending or reply-
694        ing to a message does.
695
696        _\b2_\b._\b6  _\bP_\bo_\bs_\bt_\bp_\bo_\bn_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl
697
698        At times it is desirable to delay sending a message that you have already begun
699        to compose.  When the _\bp_\bo_\bs_\bt_\bp_\bo_\bn_\be_\b-_\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be function is used in the _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bp_\bo_\bs_\be menu,
700        the body of your message and attachments are stored in the mailbox specified by
701        the _\b$_\bp_\bo_\bs_\bt_\bp_\bo_\bn_\be_\bd (section 6.3.212  , page 116) variable.  This means that you can
702        recall the message even if you exit Mutt and then restart it at a later time.
703
704        Once a message is postponed, there are several ways to resume it.  From the
705        command line you can use the ``-p'' option, or if you _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bp_\bo_\bs_\be a new message
706        from the _\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx or _\bp_\ba_\bg_\be_\br you will be prompted if postponed messages exist.  If
707        multiple messages are currently postponed, the _\bp_\bo_\bs_\bt_\bp_\bo_\bn_\be_\bd menu will pop up and
708        you can select which message you would like to resume.
709
710        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: If you postpone a reply to a message, the reply setting of the message is
711        only updated when you actually finish the message and send it.  Also, you must
712        be in the same folder with the message you replied to for the status of the
713        message to be updated.
714
715        See also the _\b$_\bp_\bo_\bs_\bt_\bp_\bo_\bn_\be (section 6.3.211  , page 116) quad-option.
716
717        _\b2_\b._\b7  _\bR_\be_\ba_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bn_\be_\bw_\bs _\bv_\bi_\ba _\bN_\bN_\bT_\bP
718
719        If compiled with ``--enable-nntp'' option, Mutt can read news from newsserver
720        via NNTP.  You can open a newsgroup with function ``change-newsgroup''
721        (default: i).  Default newsserver can be obtained from _\bN_\bN_\bT_\bP_\bS_\bE_\bR_\bV_\bE_\bR environment
722        variable.  Like other news readers, info about subscribed newsgroups is saved
723        in file by _\b$_\bn_\be_\bw_\bs_\br_\bc (section , page ) variable.  Article headers are cached and
724        can be loaded from file when newsgroup entered instead loading from newsserver.
725
726        _\b3_\b.  _\bC_\bo_\bn_\bf_\bi_\bg_\bu_\br_\ba_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn
727
728        While the default configuration (or ``preferences'') make Mutt-ng usable right
729        out of the box, it is often desirable to tailor Mutt to suit your own tastes.
730        When Mutt-ng is first invoked, it will attempt to read the ``system'' configu-
731        ration file (defaults set by your local system administrator), unless the
732        ``-n'' _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd _\bl_\bi_\bn_\be (section 6.1  , page 62) option is specified.  This file is
733        typically /usr/local/share/muttng/Muttngrc or /etc/Muttngrc, Mutt-ng users will
734        find this file in /usr/local/share/muttng/Muttrc or /etc/Muttngrc. Mutt will
735        next look for a file named .muttrc in your home directory, Mutt-ng will look
736        for .muttngrc.  If this file does not exist and your home directory has a sub-
737        directory named .mutt, mutt try to load a file named .muttng/muttngrc.
738
739        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    15
740
741        .muttrc (or .muttngrc for Mutt-ng) is the file where you will usually place
742        your _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd_\bs (section 6.2  , page 62) to configure Mutt.
743
744        In addition, mutt supports version specific configuration files that are parsed
745        instead of the default files as explained above.  For instance, if your system
746        has a Muttrc-0.88 file in the system configuration directory, and you are run-
747        ning version 0.88 of mutt, this file will be sourced instead of the Muttrc
748        file.  The same is true of the user configuration file, if you have a file
749        .muttrc-0.88.6 in your home directory, when you run mutt version 0.88.6, it
750        will source this file instead of the default .muttrc file.  The version number
751        is the same which is visible using the ``-v'' _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd _\bl_\bi_\bn_\be (section 6.1  , page
752        62) switch or using the show-version key (default: V) from the index menu.
753
754        _\b3_\b._\b1  _\bS_\by_\bn_\bt_\ba_\bx _\bo_\bf _\bI_\bn_\bi_\bt_\bi_\ba_\bl_\bi_\bz_\ba_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn _\bF_\bi_\bl_\be_\bs
755
756        An initialization file consists of a series of _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd_\bs (section 6.2  , page
757        62).  Each line of the file may contain one or more commands.  When multiple
758        commands are used, they must be separated by a semicolon (;).
759
760             set realname='Mutt user' ; ignore x-
761
762        The hash mark, or pound sign (``#''), is used as a ``comment'' character. You
763        can use it to annotate your initialization file. All text after the comment
764        character to the end of the line is ignored. For example,
765
766             my_hdr X-Disclaimer: Why are you listening to me? # This is a comment
767
768        Single quotes (') and double quotes (') can be used to quote strings which con-
769        tain spaces or other special characters.  The difference between the two types
770        of quotes is similar to that of many popular shell programs, namely that a sin-
771        gle quote is used to specify a literal string (one that is not interpreted for
772        shell variables or quoting with a backslash [see next paragraph]), while double
773        quotes indicate a string for which should be evaluated.  For example, backtics
774        are evaluated inside of double quotes, but n\bno\bot\bt for single quotes.
775
776        \ quotes the next character, just as in shells such as bash and zsh.  For exam-
777        ple, if want to put quotes ``''' inside of a string, you can use ``\'' to force
778        the next character to be a literal instead of interpreted character.
779
780             set realname="Michael \"MuttDude\" Elkins"
781
782        ``\\'' means to insert a literal ``\'' into the line.  ``\n'' and ``\r'' have
783        their usual C meanings of linefeed and carriage-return, respectively.
784
785        A \ at the end of a line can be used to split commands over multiple lines,
786        provided that the split points don't appear in the middle of command names.
787
788        Please note that, unlike the various shells, mutt-ng interprets a ``\'' at the
789        end of a line also in comments. This allows you to disable a command split over
790        multiple lines with only one ``#''.
791
792        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    16
793
794             # folder-hook . \
795               set realname="Michael \"MuttDude\" Elkins"
796
797        When testing your config files, beware the following caveat. The backslash at
798        the end of the commented line extends the current line with the next line -
799        then referred to as a ``continuation line''.  As the first line is commented
800        with a hash (#) all following continuation lines are also part of a comment and
801        therefore are ignored, too. So take care of comments when continuation lines
802        are involved within your setup files!
803
804        Abstract example:
805
806             line1\
807             line2a # line2b\
808             line3\
809             line4
810             line5
811
812        line1 ``continues'' until line4. however, the part after the # is a comment
813        which includes line3 and line4. line5 is a new line of its own and thus is
814        interpreted again.
815
816        It is also possible to substitute the output of a Unix command in an initial-
817        ization file.  This is accomplished by enclosing the command in backquotes
818        (``).  For example,
819
820             my_hdr X-Operating-System: `uname -a`
821
822        The output of the Unix command ``uname -a'' will be substituted before the line
823        is parsed.  Note that since initialization files are line oriented, only the
824        first line of output from the Unix command will be substituted.
825
826        UNIX environments can be accessed like the way it is done in shells like sh and
827        bash: Prepend the name of the environment by a ``$''.  For example,
828
829             set record=+sent_on_$HOSTNAME
830
831        The commands understood by mutt are explained in the next paragraphs.  For a
832        complete list, see the _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd _\br_\be_\bf_\be_\br_\be_\bn_\bc_\be (section 6.2  , page 62).
833
834        _\b3_\b._\b2  _\bD_\be_\bf_\bi_\bn_\bi_\bn_\bg_\b/_\bU_\bs_\bi_\bn_\bg _\ba_\bl_\bi_\ba_\bs_\be_\bs
835
836        Usage: alias _\bk_\be_\by _\ba_\bd_\bd_\br_\be_\bs_\bs [ , _\ba_\bd_\bd_\br_\be_\bs_\bs, ... ]
837
838        It's usually very cumbersome to remember or type out the address of someone you
839        are communicating with.  Mutt allows you to create ``aliases'' which map a
840        short string to a full address.
841
842        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: if you want to create an alias for a group (by specifying more than one
843
844        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    17
845
846        address), you m\bmu\bus\bst\bt separate the addresses with a comma (``,'').
847
848        To remove an alias or aliases (``*'' means all aliases):
849
850        unalias [ * | _\bk_\be_\by _\b._\b._\b. ]
851
852             alias muttdude me@cs.hmc.edu (Michael Elkins)
853             alias theguys manny, moe, jack
854
855        Unlike other mailers, Mutt doesn't require aliases to be defined in a special
856        file.  The alias command can appear anywhere in a configuration file, as long
857        as this file is _\bs_\bo_\bu_\br_\bc_\be_\bd (section 3.26  , page 32).  Consequently, you can have
858        multiple alias files, or you can have all aliases defined in your muttrc.
859
860        On the other hand, the _\bc_\br_\be_\ba_\bt_\be_\b-_\ba_\bl_\bi_\ba_\bs (section 2.3.4  , page 7) function can use
861        only one file, the one pointed to by the _\b$_\ba_\bl_\bi_\ba_\bs_\b__\bf_\bi_\bl_\be (section 6.3.3  , page 65)
862        variable (which is ~/.muttrc by default). This file is not special either, in
863        the sense that Mutt will happily append aliases to any file, but in order for
864        the new aliases to take effect you need to explicitly _\bs_\bo_\bu_\br_\bc_\be (section 3.26  ,
865        page 32) this file too.
866
867        For example:
868
869             source /usr/local/share/Mutt.aliases
870             source ~/.mail_aliases
871             set alias_file=~/.mail_aliases
872
873        To use aliases, you merely use the alias at any place in mutt where mutt
874        prompts for addresses, such as the _\bT_\bo_\b: or _\bC_\bc_\b: prompt.  You can also enter
875        aliases in your editor at the appropriate headers if you have the _\b$_\be_\bd_\bi_\bt_\b__\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\bs
876        (section 6.3.54  , page 77) variable set.
877
878        In addition, at the various address prompts, you can use the tab character to
879        expand a partial alias to the full alias.  If there are multiple matches, mutt
880        will bring up a menu with the matching aliases.  In order to be presented with
881        the full list of aliases, you must hit tab with out a partial alias, such as at
882        the beginning of the prompt or after a comma denoting multiple addresses.
883
884        In the alias menu, you can select as many aliases as you want with the _\bs_\be_\bl_\be_\bc_\bt_\b-
885        _\be_\bn_\bt_\br_\by key (default: RET), and use the _\be_\bx_\bi_\bt key (default: q) to return to the
886        address prompt.
887
888        _\b3_\b._\b3  _\bC_\bh_\ba_\bn_\bg_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bt_\bh_\be _\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt _\bk_\be_\by _\bb_\bi_\bn_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg_\bs
889
890        Usage: bind _\bm_\ba_\bp _\bk_\be_\by _\bf_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn
891
892        This command allows you to change the default key bindings (operation invoked
893        when pressing a key).
894
895        _\bm_\ba_\bp specifies in which menu the binding belongs.  Multiple maps may be
896
897        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    18
898
899        specified by separating them with commas (no additional whitespace is allowed).
900        The currently defined maps are:
901
902              generic
903                    This is not a real menu, but is used as a fallback for all of the
904                    other menus except for the pager and editor modes.  If a key is not
905                    defined in another menu, Mutt will look for a binding to use in
906                    this menu.  This allows you to bind a key to a certain function in
907                    multiple menus instead of having multiple bind statements to accom-
908                    plish the same task.
909
910              alias
911                    The alias menu is the list of your personal aliases as defined in
912                    your muttrc.  It is the mapping from a short alias name to the full
913                    email address(es) of the recipient(s).
914
915              attach
916                    The attachment menu is used to access the attachments on received
917                    messages.
918
919              browser
920                    The browser is used for both browsing the local directory struc-
921                    ture, and for listing all of your incoming mailboxes.
922
923              editor
924                    The editor is the line-based editor the user enters text data.
925
926              index
927                    The index is the list of messages contained in a mailbox.
928
929              compose
930                    The compose menu is the screen used when sending a new message.
931
932              pager
933                    The pager is the mode used to display message/attachment data, and
934                    help listings.
935
936              pgp
937                    The pgp menu is used to select the OpenPGP keys used for encrypting
938                    outgoing messages.
939
940              postpone
941                    The postpone menu is similar to the index menu, except is used when
942                    recalling a message the user was composing, but saved until later.
943
944        _\bk_\be_\by is the key (or key sequence) you wish to bind.  To specify a control char-
945        acter, use the sequence _\b\_\bC_\bx, where _\bx is the letter of the control character
946        (for example, to specify control-A use ``\Ca'').  Note that the case of _\bx as
947        well as _\b\_\bC is ignored, so that _\b\_\bC_\bA, _\b\_\bC_\ba, _\b\_\bc_\bA and _\b\_\bc_\ba are all equivalent.  An
948        alternative form is to specify the key as a three digit octal number prefixed
949        with a ``\'' (for example _\b\_\b1_\b7_\b7 is equivalent to _\b\_\bc_\b?).
950
951        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    19
952
953        In addition, _\bk_\be_\by may consist of:
954
955             \t              tab
956             <tab>           tab
957             \r              carriage return
958             \n              newline
959             \e              escape
960             <esc>           escape
961             <up>            up arrow
962             <down>          down arrow
963             <left>          left arrow
964             <right>         right arrow
965             <pageup>        Page Up
966             <pagedown>      Page Down
967             <backspace>     Backspace
968             <delete>        Delete
969             <insert>        Insert
970             <enter>         Enter
971             <return>        Return
972             <home>          Home
973             <end>           End
974             <space>         Space bar
975             <f1>            function key 1
976             <f10>           function key 10
977
978        _\bk_\be_\by does not need to be enclosed in quotes unless it contains a space (`` '').
979
980        _\bf_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn specifies which action to take when _\bk_\be_\by is pressed.  For a complete
981        list of functions, see the _\br_\be_\bf_\be_\br_\be_\bn_\bc_\be (section 6.4  , page 146).  The special
982        function noop unbinds the specified key sequence.
983
984        _\b3_\b._\b4  _\bD_\be_\bf_\bi_\bn_\bi_\bn_\bg _\ba_\bl_\bi_\ba_\bs_\be_\bs _\bf_\bo_\br _\bc_\bh_\ba_\br_\ba_\bc_\bt_\be_\br _\bs_\be_\bt_\bs
985
986        Usage: charset-hook _\ba_\bl_\bi_\ba_\bs _\bc_\bh_\ba_\br_\bs_\be_\bt
987
988        Usage: iconv-hook _\bc_\bh_\ba_\br_\bs_\be_\bt _\bl_\bo_\bc_\ba_\bl_\b-_\bc_\bh_\ba_\br_\bs_\be_\bt
989
990        The charset-hook command defines an alias for a character set.  This is useful
991        to properly display messages which are tagged with a character set name not
992        known to mutt.
993
994        The iconv-hook command defines a system-specific name for a character set.
995        This is helpful when your systems character conversion library insists on using
996        strange, system-specific names for character sets.
997
998        _\b3_\b._\b5  _\bS_\be_\bt_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be_\bs _\bb_\ba_\bs_\be_\bd _\bu_\bp_\bo_\bn _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx
999
1000        Usage: folder-hook [!]_\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd
1001
1002        It is often desirable to change settings based on which mailbox you are read-
1003        ing.  The folder-hook command provides a method by which you can execute any
1004        configuration command.  _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp is a regular expression specifying in which
1005
1006        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    20
1007
1008        mailboxes to execute _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd before loading.  If a mailbox matches multiple
1009        folder-hook's, they are executed in the order given in the muttrc.
1010
1011        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: if you use the ``!'' shortcut for _\b$_\bs_\bp_\bo_\bo_\bl_\bf_\bi_\bl_\be (section 6.3.293  , page
1012        135) at the beginning of the pattern, you must place it inside of double or
1013        single quotes in order to distinguish it from the logical _\bn_\bo_\bt operator for the
1014        expression.
1015
1016        Note that the settings are _\bn_\bo_\bt restored when you leave the mailbox.  For exam-
1017        ple, a command action to perform is to change the sorting method based upon the
1018        mailbox being read:
1019
1020             folder-hook mutt set sort=threads
1021
1022        However, the sorting method is not restored to its previous value when reading
1023        a different mailbox.  To specify a _\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt command, use the pattern ``.'':
1024
1025             folder-hook . set sort=date-sent
1026
1027        _\b3_\b._\b6  _\bK_\be_\by_\bb_\bo_\ba_\br_\bd _\bm_\ba_\bc_\br_\bo_\bs
1028
1029        Usage: macro _\bm_\be_\bn_\bu _\bk_\be_\by _\bs_\be_\bq_\bu_\be_\bn_\bc_\be [ _\bd_\be_\bs_\bc_\br_\bi_\bp_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn ]
1030
1031        Macros are useful when you would like a single key to perform a series of
1032        actions.  When you press _\bk_\be_\by in menu _\bm_\be_\bn_\bu, Mutt will behave as if you had typed
1033        _\bs_\be_\bq_\bu_\be_\bn_\bc_\be.  So if you have a common sequence of commands you type, you can cre-
1034        ate a macro to execute those commands with a single key.
1035
1036        _\bm_\be_\bn_\bu is the _\bm_\ba_\bp (section 3.3  , page 17) which the macro will be bound.  Multi-
1037        ple maps may be specified by separating multiple menu arguments by commas.
1038        Whitespace may not be used in between the menu arguments and the commas sepa-
1039        rating them.
1040
1041        _\bk_\be_\by and _\bs_\be_\bq_\bu_\be_\bn_\bc_\be are expanded by the same rules as the _\bk_\be_\by _\bb_\bi_\bn_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg_\bs (section
1042        3.3  , page 17).  There are some additions however.  The first is that control
1043        characters in _\bs_\be_\bq_\bu_\be_\bn_\bc_\be can also be specified as _\b^_\bx.  In order to get a caret
1044        (`^'') you need to use _\b^_\b^.  Secondly, to specify a certain key such as _\bu_\bp or to
1045        invoke a function directly, you can use the format _\b<_\bk_\be_\by _\bn_\ba_\bm_\be_\b> and _\b<_\bf_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn
1046        _\bn_\ba_\bm_\be_\b>.  For a listing of key names see the section on _\bk_\be_\by _\bb_\bi_\bn_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg_\bs (section
1047        3.3  , page 17).  Functions are listed in the _\bf_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn _\br_\be_\bf_\be_\br_\be_\bn_\bc_\be (section
1048        6.4  , page 146).
1049
1050        The advantage with using function names directly is that the macros will work
1051        regardless of the current key bindings, so they are not dependent on the user
1052        having particular key definitions.  This makes them more robust and portable,
1053        and also facilitates defining of macros in files used by more than one user
1054        (eg. the system Muttrc).
1055
1056        Optionally you can specify a descriptive text after _\bs_\be_\bq_\bu_\be_\bn_\bc_\be, which is shown in
1057        the help screens.
1058
1059        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    21
1060
1061        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: Macro definitions (if any) listed in the help screen(s), are silently
1062        truncated at the screen width, and are not wrapped.
1063
1064        _\b3_\b._\b7  _\bU_\bs_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bc_\bo_\bl_\bo_\br _\ba_\bn_\bd _\bm_\bo_\bn_\bo _\bv_\bi_\bd_\be_\bo _\ba_\bt_\bt_\br_\bi_\bb_\bu_\bt_\be_\bs
1065
1066        Usage: color _\bo_\bb_\bj_\be_\bc_\bt _\bf_\bo_\br_\be_\bg_\br_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bd _\bb_\ba_\bc_\bk_\bg_\br_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bd [ _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp ]
1067
1068        Usage: color index _\bf_\bo_\br_\be_\bg_\br_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bd _\bb_\ba_\bc_\bk_\bg_\br_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bd _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn
1069
1070        Usage: uncolor index _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn [ _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn ...  ]
1071
1072        If your terminal supports color, you can spice up Mutt by creating your own
1073        color scheme.  To define the color of an object (type of information), you must
1074        specify both a foreground color a\ban\bnd\bd a background color (it is not possible to
1075        only specify one or the other).
1076
1077        _\bo_\bb_\bj_\be_\bc_\bt can be one of:
1078
1079           +\bo attachment
1080
1081           +\bo body (match _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp in the body of messages)
1082
1083           +\bo bold (highlighting bold patterns in the body of messages)
1084
1085           +\bo error (error messages printed by Mutt)
1086
1087           +\bo header (match _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp in the message header)
1088
1089           +\bo hdrdefault (default color of the message header in the pager)
1090
1091           +\bo index (match _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn in the message index)
1092
1093           +\bo indicator (arrow or bar used to indicate the current item in a menu)
1094
1095           +\bo markers (the ``+'' markers at the beginning of wrapped lines in the pager)
1096
1097           +\bo message (informational messages)
1098
1099           +\bo normal
1100
1101           +\bo quoted (text matching _\b$_\bq_\bu_\bo_\bt_\be_\b__\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp (section 6.3.223  , page 119) in the
1102             body of a message)
1103
1104           +\bo quoted1, quoted2, ..., quotedN\bN (higher levels of quoting)
1105
1106           +\bo search (highlighting of words in the pager)
1107
1108           +\bo signature
1109
1110           +\bo status (mode lines used to display info about the mailbox or message)
1111
1112           +\bo tilde (the ``~'' used to pad blank lines in the pager)
1113
1114        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    22
1115
1116           +\bo tree (thread tree drawn in the message index and attachment menu)
1117
1118           +\bo underline (highlighting underlined patterns in the body of messages)
1119
1120        _\bf_\bo_\br_\be_\bg_\br_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bd and _\bb_\ba_\bc_\bk_\bg_\br_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bd can be one of the following:
1121
1122           +\bo white
1123
1124           +\bo black
1125
1126           +\bo green
1127
1128           +\bo magenta
1129
1130           +\bo blue
1131
1132           +\bo cyan
1133
1134           +\bo yellow
1135
1136           +\bo red
1137
1138           +\bo default
1139
1140           +\bo color_\bx
1141
1142        _\bf_\bo_\br_\be_\bg_\br_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bd can optionally be prefixed with the keyword bright to make the fore-
1143        ground color boldfaced (e.g., brightred).
1144
1145        If your terminal supports it, the special keyword _\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt can be used as a
1146        transparent color.  The value _\bb_\br_\bi_\bg_\bh_\bt_\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt is also valid.  If Mutt is linked
1147        against the _\bS_\b-_\bL_\ba_\bn_\bg library, you also need to set the _\bC_\bO_\bL_\bO_\bR_\bF_\bG_\bB_\bG environment
1148        variable to the default colors of your terminal for this to work; for example
1149        (for Bourne-like shells):
1150
1151             set COLORFGBG="green;black"
1152             export COLORFGBG
1153
1154        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: The _\bS_\b-_\bL_\ba_\bn_\bg library requires you to use the _\bl_\bi_\bg_\bh_\bt_\bg_\br_\ba_\by and _\bb_\br_\bo_\bw_\bn keywords
1155        instead of _\bw_\bh_\bi_\bt_\be and _\by_\be_\bl_\bl_\bo_\bw when setting this variable.
1156
1157        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: The uncolor command can be applied to the index object only.  It removes
1158        entries from the list. You m\bmu\bus\bst\bt specify the same pattern specified in the color
1159        command for it to be removed.  The pattern ``*'' is a special token which means
1160        to clear the color index list of all entries.
1161
1162        Mutt also recognizes the keywords _\bc_\bo_\bl_\bo_\br_\b0, _\bc_\bo_\bl_\bo_\br_\b1, ..., _\bc_\bo_\bl_\bo_\brN\bN-\b-1\b1 (N\bN being the
1163        number of colors supported by your terminal).  This is useful when you remap
1164        the colors for your display (for example by changing the color associated with
1165        _\bc_\bo_\bl_\bo_\br_\b2 for your xterm), since color names may then lose their normal meaning.
1166
1167        If your terminal does not support color, it is still possible change the video
1168
1169        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    23
1170
1171        attributes through the use of the ``mono'' command:
1172
1173        Usage: mono _\b<_\bo_\bb_\bj_\be_\bc_\bt_\b> _\b<_\ba_\bt_\bt_\br_\bi_\bb_\bu_\bt_\be_\b> [ _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp ]
1174
1175        Usage: mono index _\ba_\bt_\bt_\br_\bi_\bb_\bu_\bt_\be _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn
1176
1177        Usage: unmono index _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn [ _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn ...  ]
1178
1179        where _\ba_\bt_\bt_\br_\bi_\bb_\bu_\bt_\be is one of the following:
1180
1181           +\bo none
1182
1183           +\bo bold
1184
1185           +\bo underline
1186
1187           +\bo reverse
1188
1189           +\bo standout
1190
1191        _\b3_\b._\b8  _\bI_\bg_\bn_\bo_\br_\bi_\bn_\bg _\b(_\bw_\be_\be_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg_\b) _\bu_\bn_\bw_\ba_\bn_\bt_\be_\bd _\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\bs
1192
1193        Usage: [un]ignore _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn [ _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn ... ]
1194
1195        Messages often have many header fields added by automatic processing systems,
1196        or which may not seem useful to display on the screen.  This command allows you
1197        to specify header fields which you don't normally want to see.
1198
1199        You do not need to specify the full header field name.  For example, ``ignore
1200        content-'' will ignore all header fields that begin with the pattern ``con-
1201        tent-''. ``ignore *'' will ignore all headers.
1202
1203        To remove a previously added token from the list, use the ``unignore'' command.
1204        The ``unignore'' command will make Mutt display headers with the given pattern.
1205        For example, if you do ``ignore x-'' it is possible to ``unignore x-mailer''.
1206
1207        ``unignore *'' will remove all tokens from the ignore list.
1208
1209        For example:
1210
1211             # Sven's draconian header weeding
1212             ignore *
1213             unignore from date subject to cc
1214             unignore organization organisation x-mailer: x-newsreader: x-mailing-list:
1215             unignore posted-to:
1216
1217        _\b3_\b._\b9  _\bA_\bl_\bt_\be_\br_\bn_\ba_\bt_\bi_\bv_\be _\ba_\bd_\bd_\br_\be_\bs_\bs_\be_\bs
1218
1219        Usage: [un]alternates _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp [ _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp ... ]
1220
1221        With various functions, mutt will treat messages differently, depending on
1222        whether you sent them or whether you received them from someone else.  For
1223        instance, when replying to a message that you sent to a different party, mutt
1224
1225        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    24
1226
1227        will automatically suggest to send the response to the original message's
1228        recipients -- responding to yourself won't make much sense in many cases.  (See
1229        _\b$_\br_\be_\bp_\bl_\by_\b__\bt_\bo (section 6.3.231  , page 120).)
1230
1231        Many users receive e-mail under a number of different addresses. To fully use
1232        mutt's features here, the program must be able to recognize what e-mail
1233        addresses you receive mail under. That's the purpose of the alternates command:
1234        It takes a list of regular expressions, each of which can identify an address
1235        under which you receive e-mail.
1236
1237        The unalternates command can be used to write exceptions to alternates pat-
1238        terns. If an address matches something in an alternates command, but you none-
1239        theless do not think it is from you, you can list a more precise pattern under
1240        an unalternates command.
1241
1242        To remove a regular expression from the alternates list, use the unalternates
1243        command with exactly the same _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp.  Likewise, if the _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp for a alternates
1244        command matches an entry on the unalternates list, that unalternates entry will
1245        be removed. If the _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp for unalternates is ``*'', _\ba_\bl_\bl _\be_\bn_\bt_\br_\bi_\be_\bs on alternates
1246        will be removed.
1247
1248        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b0  _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bl_\bi_\bs_\bt_\bs
1249
1250        Usage: [un]lists _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp [ _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp ... ]
1251
1252        Usage: [un]subscribe _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp [ _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp ... ]
1253
1254        Mutt has a few nice features for _\bh_\ba_\bn_\bd_\bl_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bl_\bi_\bs_\bt_\bs (section 4.9  , page
1255        44).  In order to take advantage of them, you must specify which addresses
1256        belong to mailing lists, and which mailing lists you are subscribed to.  Once
1257        you have done this, the _\bl_\bi_\bs_\bt_\b-_\br_\be_\bp_\bl_\by (section 2.3.4  , page 8) function will work
1258        for all known lists.  Additionally, when you send a message to a subscribed
1259        list, mutt will add a Mail-Followup-To header to tell other users' mail user
1260        agents not to send copies of replies to your personal address.   Note that the
1261        Mail-Followup-To header is a non-standard extension which is not supported by
1262        all mail user agents.  Adding it is not bullet-proof against receiving personal
1263        CCs of list messages.  Also note that the generation of the Mail-Followup-To
1264        header is controlled by the _\b$_\bf_\bo_\bl_\bl_\bo_\bw_\bu_\bp_\b__\bt_\bo (section 6.3.65  , page 80) configura-
1265        tion variable.
1266
1267        More precisely, Mutt maintains lists of patterns for the addresses of known and
1268        subscribed mailing lists.  Every subscribed mailing list is known. To mark a
1269        mailing list as known, use the ``lists'' command.  To mark it as subscribed,
1270        use ``subscribe''.
1271
1272        You can use regular expressions with both commands.  To mark all messages sent
1273        to a specific bug report's address on mutt's bug tracking system as list mail,
1274        for instance, you could say ``subscribe [0-9]*@bugs.guug.de''.  Often, it's
1275        sufficient to just give a portion of the list's e-mail address.
1276
1277        Specify as much of the address as you need to to remove ambiguity.  For exam-
1278        ple, if you've subscribed to the Mutt mailing list, you will receive mail
1279        addressed to _\bm_\bu_\bt_\bt_\b-_\bu_\bs_\be_\br_\bs_\b@_\bm_\bu_\bt_\bt_\b._\bo_\br_\bg.  So, to tell Mutt that this is a mailing
1280        list, you could add ``lists mutt-users'' to your initialization file.  To tell
1281
1282        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    25
1283
1284        mutt that you are subscribed to it, add ``subscribe mutt-users'' to your ini-
1285        tialization file instead.  If you also happen to get mail from someone whose
1286        address is _\bm_\bu_\bt_\bt_\b-_\bu_\bs_\be_\br_\bs_\b@_\be_\bx_\ba_\bm_\bp_\bl_\be_\b._\bc_\bo_\bm, you could use ``lists mutt-
1287        users@mutt\\.org'' or ``subscribe mutt-users@mutt\\.org'' to match only mail
1288        from the actual list.
1289
1290        The ``unlists'' command is used to remove a token from the list of known and
1291        subscribed mailing-lists. Use ``unlists *'' to remove all tokens.
1292
1293        To remove a mailing list from the list of subscribed mailing lists, but keep it
1294        on the list of known mailing lists, use ``unsubscribe''.
1295
1296        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b1  _\bU_\bs_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bM_\bu_\bl_\bt_\bi_\bp_\bl_\be _\bs_\bp_\bo_\bo_\bl _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx_\be_\bs
1297
1298        Usage: mbox-hook [!]_\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx
1299
1300        This command is used to move read messages from a specified mailbox to a dif-
1301        ferent mailbox automatically when you quit or change folders.  _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn is a
1302        regular expression specifying the mailbox to treat as a ``spool'' mailbox and
1303        _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx specifies where mail should be saved when read.
1304
1305        Unlike some of the other _\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk commands, only the _\bf_\bi_\br_\bs_\bt matching pattern is used
1306        (it is not possible to save read mail in more than a single mailbox).
1307
1308        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b2  _\bD_\be_\bf_\bi_\bn_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx_\be_\bs _\bw_\bh_\bi_\bc_\bh _\br_\be_\bc_\be_\bi_\bv_\be _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl
1309
1310        Usage: [un]mailboxes [!]_\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be [ _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be ... ]
1311
1312        This command specifies folders which can receive mail and which will be checked
1313        for new messages.  By default, the main menu status bar displays how many of
1314        these folders have new messages.
1315
1316        When changing folders, pressing _\bs_\bp_\ba_\bc_\be will cycle through folders with new mail.
1317
1318        Pressing TAB in the directory browser will bring up a menu showing the files
1319        specified by the mailboxes command, and indicate which contain new messages.
1320        Mutt will automatically enter this mode when invoked from the command line with
1321        the -y option.
1322
1323        The ``unmailboxes'' command is used to remove a token from the list of folders
1324        which receive mail. Use ``unmailboxes *'' to remove all tokens.
1325
1326        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: new mail is detected by comparing the last modification time to the last
1327        access time.  Utilities like biff or frm or any other program which accesses
1328        the mailbox might cause Mutt to never detect new mail for that mailbox if they
1329        do not properly reset the access time.  Backup tools are another common reason
1330        for updated access times.
1331
1332        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: the filenames in the mailboxes command are resolved when the command is
1333        executed, so if these names contain _\bs_\bh_\bo_\br_\bt_\bc_\bu_\bt _\bc_\bh_\ba_\br_\ba_\bc_\bt_\be_\br_\bs (section 4.8  , page
1334        44) (such as ``='' and ``!''), any variable definition that affect these char-
1335        acters (like _\b$_\bf_\bo_\bl_\bd_\be_\br (section 6.3.63  , page 79) and _\b$_\bs_\bp_\bo_\bo_\bl_\bf_\bi_\bl_\be (section
1336        6.3.293  , page 135)) should be executed before the mailboxes command.
1337
1338        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    26
1339
1340        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b3  _\bU_\bs_\be_\br _\bd_\be_\bf_\bi_\bn_\be_\bd _\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\bs
1341
1342        Usage:
1343
1344        my_hdr _\bs_\bt_\br_\bi_\bn_\bg
1345
1346        unmy_hdr _\bf_\bi_\be_\bl_\bd [ _\bf_\bi_\be_\bl_\bd ... ]
1347
1348        The ``my_hdr'' command allows you to create your own header fields which will
1349        be added to every message you send.
1350
1351        For example, if you would like to add an ``Organization:'' header field to all
1352        of your outgoing messages, you can put the command
1353
1354             my_hdr Organization: A Really Big Company, Anytown, USA
1355
1356        in your .muttrc.
1357
1358        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b:  space characters are _\bn_\bo_\bt allowed between the keyword and the colon
1359        (``:'').  The standard for electronic mail (RFC822) says that space is illegal
1360        there, so Mutt enforces the rule.
1361
1362        If you would like to add a header field to a single message, you should either
1363        set the _\be_\bd_\bi_\bt_\b__\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\bs (section 6.3.54  , page 77) variable, or use the _\be_\bd_\bi_\bt_\b-
1364        _\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\bs function (default: ``E'') in the send-menu so that you can edit the
1365        header of your message along with the body.
1366
1367        To remove user defined header fields, use the ``unmy_hdr'' command.  You may
1368        specify an asterisk (``*'') to remove all header fields, or the fields to
1369        remove.  For example, to remove all ``To'' and ``Cc'' header fields, you could
1370        use:
1371
1372             unmy_hdr to cc
1373
1374        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b4  _\bD_\be_\bf_\bi_\bn_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bt_\bh_\be _\bo_\br_\bd_\be_\br _\bo_\bf _\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\bs _\bw_\bh_\be_\bn _\bv_\bi_\be_\bw_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be_\bs
1375
1376        Usage: hdr_order _\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\b1 _\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\b2 _\bh_\be_\ba_\bd_\be_\br_\b3
1377
1378        With this command, you can specify an order in which mutt will attempt to
1379        present headers to you when viewing messages.
1380
1381        ``unhdr_order *'' will clear all previous headers from the order list, thus
1382        removing the header order effects set by the system-wide startup file.
1383
1384             hdr_order From Date: From: To: Cc: Subject:
1385
1386        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b5  _\bS_\bp_\be_\bc_\bi_\bf_\by _\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt _\bs_\ba_\bv_\be _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be
1387
1388        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    27
1389
1390        Usage: save-hook [!]_\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be
1391
1392        This command is used to override the default filename used when saving mes-
1393        sages.  _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be will be used as the default filename if the message is _\bF_\br_\bo_\bm_\b:
1394        an address matching _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp or if you are the author and the message is
1395        addressed _\bt_\bo_\b: something matching _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp.
1396
1397        See _\bM_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\bM_\ba_\bt_\bc_\bh_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bi_\bn _\bH_\bo_\bo_\bk_\bs (section 4.4.1  , page 41) for information on the
1398        exact format of _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn.
1399
1400        Examples:
1401
1402             save-hook me@(turing\\.)?cs\\.hmc\\.edu$ +elkins
1403             save-hook aol\\.com$ +spam
1404
1405        Also see the _\bf_\bc_\bc_\b-_\bs_\ba_\bv_\be_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.17  , page 27) command.
1406
1407        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b6  _\bS_\bp_\be_\bc_\bi_\bf_\by _\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt _\bF_\bc_\bc_\b: _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx _\bw_\bh_\be_\bn _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bp_\bo_\bs_\bi_\bn_\bg
1408
1409        Usage: fcc-hook [!]_\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx
1410
1411        This command is used to save outgoing mail in a mailbox other than _\b$_\br_\be_\bc_\bo_\br_\bd
1412        (section 6.3.228  , page 120).  Mutt searches the initial list of message
1413        recipients for the first matching _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp and uses _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx as the default Fcc:
1414        mailbox.  If no match is found the message will be saved to _\b$_\br_\be_\bc_\bo_\br_\bd (section
1415        6.3.228  , page 120) mailbox.
1416
1417        See _\bM_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\bM_\ba_\bt_\bc_\bh_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bi_\bn _\bH_\bo_\bo_\bk_\bs (section 4.4.1  , page 41) for information on the
1418        exact format of _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn.
1419
1420        Example: fcc-hook [@.]aol\\.com$ +spammers
1421
1422        The above will save a copy of all messages going to the aol.com domain to the
1423        `+spammers' mailbox by default.  Also see the _\bf_\bc_\bc_\b-_\bs_\ba_\bv_\be_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.17  ,
1424        page 27) command.
1425
1426        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b7  _\bS_\bp_\be_\bc_\bi_\bf_\by _\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt _\bs_\ba_\bv_\be _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be _\ba_\bn_\bd _\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt _\bF_\bc_\bc_\b: _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx _\ba_\bt _\bo_\bn_\bc_\be
1427
1428        Usage: fcc-save-hook [!]_\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx
1429
1430        This command is a shortcut, equivalent to doing both a _\bf_\bc_\bc_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section
1431        3.16  , page 27) and a _\bs_\ba_\bv_\be_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.15  , page 26) with its arguments.
1432
1433        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b8  _\bC_\bh_\ba_\bn_\bg_\be _\bs_\be_\bt_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg_\bs _\bb_\ba_\bs_\be_\bd _\bu_\bp_\bo_\bn _\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\br_\be_\bc_\bi_\bp_\bi_\be_\bn_\bt_\bs
1434
1435        Usage: reply-hook [!]_\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd
1436
1437        Usage: send-hook [!]_\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd
1438
1439        Usage: send2-hook [!]_\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd
1440
1441        These commands can be used to execute arbitrary configuration commands based
1442
1443        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    28
1444
1445        upon recipients of the message.  _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn is a regular expression matching the
1446        desired address.  _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd is executed when _\br_\be_\bg_\be_\bx_\bp matches recipients of the
1447        message.
1448
1449        reply-hook is matched against the message you are _\br_\be_\bp_\bl_\by_\bi_\bn_\bg t\bto\bo, instead of the
1450        message you are _\bs_\be_\bn_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg.  send-hook is matched against all messages, both _\bn_\be_\bw
1451        and _\br_\be_\bp_\bl_\bi_\be_\bs.  N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: reply-hooks are matched b\bbe\bef\bfo\bor\bre\be the send-hook, r\bre\beg\bga\bar\brd\bdl\ble\bes\bss\bs of
1452        the order specified in the users's configuration file.
1453
1454        send2-hook is matched every time a message is changed, either by editing it, or
1455        by using the compose menu to change its recipients or subject.  send2-hook is
1456        executed after send-hook, and can, e.g., be used to set parameters such as the
1457        _\b$_\bs_\be_\bn_\bd_\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl (section 6.3.245  , page 124) variable depending on the message's
1458        sender address.
1459
1460        For each type of send-hook or reply-hook, when multiple matches occur, commands
1461        are executed in the order they are specified in the muttrc (for that type of
1462        hook).
1463
1464        See _\bM_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\bM_\ba_\bt_\bc_\bh_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bi_\bn _\bH_\bo_\bo_\bk_\bs (section 4.4.1  , page 41) for information on the
1465        exact format of _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn.
1466
1467        Example: send-hook mutt 'set mime_forward signature='''
1468
1469        Another typical use for this command is to change the values of the _\b$_\ba_\bt_\bt_\br_\bi_\bb_\bu_\b-
1470        _\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn (section 6.3.15  , page 68), _\b$_\bs_\bi_\bg_\bn_\ba_\bt_\bu_\br_\be (section 6.3.257  , page 127) and
1471        _\b$_\bl_\bo_\bc_\ba_\bl_\be (section 6.3.112  , page 93) variables in order to change the language
1472        of the attributions and signatures based upon the recipients.
1473
1474        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: the send-hook's are only executed ONCE after getting the initial list of
1475        recipients.  Adding a recipient after replying or editing the message will NOT
1476        cause any send-hook to be executed.  Also note that my_hdr commands which mod-
1477        ify recipient headers, or the message's subject, don't have any effect on the
1478        current message when executed from a send-hook.
1479
1480        _\b3_\b._\b1_\b9  _\bC_\bh_\ba_\bn_\bg_\be _\bs_\be_\bt_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg_\bs _\bb_\be_\bf_\bo_\br_\be _\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg _\ba _\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be
1481
1482        Usage: message-hook [!]_\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd
1483
1484        This command can be used to execute arbitrary configuration commands before
1485        viewing or formatting a message based upon information about the message.  _\bc_\bo_\bm_\b-
1486        _\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd is executed if the _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn matches the message to be displayed. When mul-
1487        tiple matches occur, commands are executed in the order they are specified in
1488        the muttrc.
1489
1490        See _\bM_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\bM_\ba_\bt_\bc_\bh_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bi_\bn _\bH_\bo_\bo_\bk_\bs (section 4.4.1  , page 41) for information on the
1491        exact format of _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn.
1492
1493        Example:
1494
1495             message-hook ~A 'set pager=builtin'
1496             message-hook '~f freshmeat-news' 'set pager="less \"+/^  subject: .*\""'
1497
1498        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    29
1499
1500        _\b3_\b._\b2_\b0  _\bC_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bs_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bt_\bh_\be _\bc_\br_\by_\bp_\bt_\bo_\bg_\br_\ba_\bp_\bh_\bi_\bc _\bk_\be_\by _\bo_\bf _\bt_\bh_\be _\br_\be_\bc_\bi_\bp_\bi_\be_\bn_\bt
1501
1502        Usage: crypt-hook _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bk_\be_\by_\bi_\bd
1503
1504        When encrypting messages with PGP or OpenSSL, you may want to associate a cer-
1505        tain key with a given e-mail address automatically, either because the recipi-
1506        ent's public key can't be deduced from the destination address, or because, for
1507        some reasons, you need to override the key Mutt would normally use.  The crypt-
1508        hook command provides a method by which you can specify the ID of the public
1509        key to be used when encrypting messages to a certain recipient.
1510
1511        The meaning of "key id" is to be taken broadly in this context:  You can either
1512        put a numerical key ID here, an e-mail address, or even just a real name.
1513
1514        _\b3_\b._\b2_\b1  _\bA_\bd_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bk_\be_\by _\bs_\be_\bq_\bu_\be_\bn_\bc_\be_\bs _\bt_\bo _\bt_\bh_\be _\bk_\be_\by_\bb_\bo_\ba_\br_\bd _\bb_\bu_\bf_\bf_\be_\br
1515
1516        Usage: push _\bs_\bt_\br_\bi_\bn_\bg
1517
1518        This command adds the named string to the keyboard buffer. The string may con-
1519        tain control characters, key names and function names like the sequence string
1520        in the _\bm_\ba_\bc_\br_\bo (section 3.6  , page 20) command. You may use it to automatically
1521        run a sequence of commands at startup, or when entering certain folders.
1522
1523        _\b3_\b._\b2_\b2  _\bE_\bx_\be_\bc_\bu_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bf_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn_\bs
1524
1525        Usage: exec _\bf_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn [ _\bf_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn ... ]
1526
1527        This command can be used to execute any function. Functions are listed in the
1528        _\bf_\bu_\bn_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn _\br_\be_\bf_\be_\br_\be_\bn_\bc_\be (section 6.4  , page 146).  ``exec function'' is equivalent
1529        to ``push <function>''.
1530
1531        _\b3_\b._\b2_\b3  _\bM_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\bS_\bc_\bo_\br_\bi_\bn_\bg
1532
1533        Usage: score _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bv_\ba_\bl_\bu_\be
1534
1535        Usage: unscore _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn [ _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn ... ]
1536
1537        The score commands adds _\bv_\ba_\bl_\bu_\be to a message's score if _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn matches it.  _\bp_\ba_\bt_\b-
1538        _\bt_\be_\br_\bn is a string in the format described in the _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn_\bs (section 4.2  , page
1539        36) section (note: For efficiency reasons, patterns which scan information not
1540        available in the index, such as ~b, ~B or ~h, may not be used).  _\bv_\ba_\bl_\bu_\be is a
1541        positive or negative integer.  A message's final score is the sum total of all
1542        matching score entries.  However, you may optionally prefix _\bv_\ba_\bl_\bu_\be with an equal
1543        sign (=) to cause evaluation to stop at a particular entry if there is a match.
1544        Negative final scores are rounded up to 0.
1545
1546        The unscore command removes score entries from the list.  You m\bmu\bus\bst\bt specify the
1547        same pattern specified in the score command for it to be removed.  The pattern
1548        ``*'' is a special token which means to clear the list of all score entries.
1549
1550        _\b3_\b._\b2_\b4  _\bS_\bp_\ba_\bm _\bd_\be_\bt_\be_\bc_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn
1551
1552        Usage: spam _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt
1553
1554        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    30
1555
1556        Usage: nospam _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn
1557
1558        Mutt has generalized support for external spam-scoring filters.  By defining
1559        your spam patterns with the spam and nospam commands, you can _\bl_\bi_\bm_\bi_\bt, _\bs_\be_\ba_\br_\bc_\bh,
1560        and _\bs_\bo_\br_\bt your mail based on its spam attributes, as determined by the external
1561        filter. You also can display the spam attributes in your index display using
1562        the %H selector in the _\b$_\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt (section 6.3.108  , page 89) variable.
1563        (Tip: try %?H?[%H] ?  to display spam tags only when they are defined for a
1564        given message.)
1565
1566        Your first step is to define your external filter's spam patterns using the
1567        spam command. _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn should be a regular expression that matches a header in a
1568        mail message. If any message in the mailbox matches this regular expression, it
1569        will receive a ``spam tag'' or ``spam attribute'' (unless it also matches a
1570        nospam pattern -- see below.) The appearance of this attribute is entirely up
1571        to you, and is governed by the _\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt parameter. _\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt can be any static text,
1572        but it also can include back-references from the _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn expression. (A regular
1573        expression ``back-reference'' refers to a sub-expression contained within
1574        parentheses.) %1 is replaced with the first back-reference in the regex, %2
1575        with the second, etc.
1576
1577        If you're using multiple spam filters, a message can have more than one spam-
1578        related header. You can define spam patterns for each filter you use. If a mes-
1579        sage matches two or more of these patterns, and the $spam_separator variable is
1580        set to a string, then the message's spam tag will consist of all the _\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt
1581        strings joined together, with the value of $spam_separator separating them.
1582
1583        For example, suppose I use DCC, SpamAssassin, and PureMessage. I might define
1584        these spam settings:
1585
1586             spam "X-DCC-.*-Metrics:.*(....)=many"         "90+/DCC-%1"
1587             spam "X-Spam-Status: Yes"                     "90+/SA"
1588             spam "X-PerlMX-Spam: .*Probability=([0-9]+)%" "%1/PM"
1589             set spam_separator=", "
1590
1591        If I then received a message that DCC registered with ``many'' hits under the
1592        ``Fuz2'' checksum, and that PureMessage registered with a 97% probability of
1593        being spam, that message's spam tag would read 90+/DCC-Fuz2, 97/PM. (The four
1594        characters before ``=many'' in a DCC report indicate the checksum used -- in
1595        this case, ``Fuz2''.)
1596
1597        If the $spam_separator variable is unset, then each spam pattern match super-
1598        sedes the previous one. Instead of getting joined _\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt strings, you'll get
1599        only the last one to match.
1600
1601        The spam tag is what will be displayed in the index when you use %H in the
1602        $index_format variable. It's also the string that the ~H pattern-matching
1603        expression matches against for _\bs_\be_\ba_\br_\bc_\bh and _\bl_\bi_\bm_\bi_\bt functions. And it's what sort-
1604        ing by spam attribute will use as a sort key.
1605
1606        That's a pretty complicated example, and most people's actual environments will
1607        have only one spam filter. The simpler your configuration, the more effective
1608        mutt can be, especially when it comes to sorting.
1609
1610        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    31
1611
1612        Generally, when you sort by spam tag, mutt will sort _\bl_\be_\bx_\bi_\bc_\ba_\bl_\bl_\by -- that is, by
1613        ordering strings alphnumerically. However, if a spam tag begins with a number,
1614        mutt will sort numerically first, and lexically only when two numbers are equal
1615        in value. (This is like UNIX's sort -n.) A message with no spam attributes at
1616        all -- that is, one that didn't match _\ba_\bn_\by of your spam patterns -- is sorted at
1617        lowest priority. Numbers are sorted next, beginning with 0 and ranging upward.
1618        Finally, non-numeric strings are sorted, with ``a'' taking lower priority than
1619        ``z''. Clearly, in general, sorting by spam tags is most effective when you can
1620        coerce your filter to give you a raw number. But in case you can't, mutt can
1621        still do something useful.
1622
1623        The nospam command can be used to write exceptions to spam patterns. If a
1624        header pattern matches something in a spam command, but you nonetheless do not
1625        want it to receive a spam tag, you can list a more precise pattern under a
1626        nospam command.
1627
1628        If the _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn given to nospam is exactly the same as the _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn on an exist-
1629        ing spam list entry, the effect will be to remove the entry from the spam list,
1630        instead of adding an exception.  Likewise, if the _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn for a spam command
1631        matches an entry on the nospam list, that nospam entry will be removed. If the
1632        _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn for nospam is ``*'', _\ba_\bl_\bl _\be_\bn_\bt_\br_\bi_\be_\bs _\bo_\bn _\bb_\bo_\bt_\bh _\bl_\bi_\bs_\bt_\bs will be removed. This
1633        might be the default action if you use spam and nospam in conjunction with a
1634        folder-hook.
1635
1636        You can have as many spam or nospam commands as you like.  You can even do your
1637        own primitive spam detection within mutt -- for example, if you consider all
1638        mail from MAILER-DAEMON to be spam, you can use a spam command like this:
1639
1640             spam "^From: .*MAILER-DAEMON"       "999"
1641
1642        _\b3_\b._\b2_\b5  _\bS_\be_\bt_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be_\bs
1643
1644        Usage: set [no|inv]_\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be[=_\bv_\ba_\bl_\bu_\be] [ _\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be ... ]
1645
1646        Usage: toggle _\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be [_\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be ... ]
1647
1648        Usage: unset _\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be [_\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be ... ]
1649
1650        Usage: reset _\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be [_\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be ... ]
1651
1652        This command is used to set (and unset) _\bc_\bo_\bn_\bf_\bi_\bg_\bu_\br_\ba_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn _\bv_\ba_\br_\bi_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be_\bs (section 6.3  ,
1653        page 64).  There are four basic types of variables: boolean, number, string and
1654        quadoption.  _\bb_\bo_\bo_\bl_\be_\ba_\bn variables can be _\bs_\be_\bt (true) or _\bu_\bn_\bs_\be_\bt (false).  _\bn_\bu_\bm_\bb_\be_\br
1655        variables can be assigned a positive integer value.
1656
1657        _\bs_\bt_\br_\bi_\bn_\bg variables consist of any number of printable characters.  _\bs_\bt_\br_\bi_\bn_\bg_\bs must
1658        be enclosed in quotes if they contain spaces or tabs.  You may also use the
1659        ``C'' escape sequences \\b\n\bn and \\b\t\bt for newline and tab, respectively.
1660
1661        _\bq_\bu_\ba_\bd_\bo_\bp_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn variables are used to control whether or not to be prompted for cer-
1662        tain actions, or to specify a default action.  A value of _\by_\be_\bs will cause the
1663        action to be carried out automatically as if you had answered yes to the
1664
1665        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    32
1666
1667        question.  Similarly, a value of _\bn_\bo will cause the the action to be carried out
1668        as if you had answered ``no.''  A value of _\ba_\bs_\bk_\b-_\by_\be_\bs will cause a prompt with a
1669        default answer of ``yes'' and _\ba_\bs_\bk_\b-_\bn_\bo will provide a default answer of ``no.''
1670
1671        Prefixing a variable with ``no'' will unset it.  Example: set noaskbcc.
1672
1673        For _\bb_\bo_\bo_\bl_\be_\ba_\bn variables, you may optionally prefix the variable name with inv to
1674        toggle the value (on or off).  This is useful when writing macros.  Example:
1675        set invsmart_wrap.
1676
1677        The toggle command automatically prepends the inv prefix to all specified vari-
1678        ables.
1679
1680        The unset command automatically prepends the no prefix to all specified vari-
1681        ables.
1682
1683        Using the enter-command function in the _\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx menu, you can query the value of
1684        a variable by prefixing the name of the variable with a question mark:
1685
1686             set ?allow_8bit
1687
1688        The question mark is actually only required for boolean and quadoption vari-
1689        ables.
1690
1691        The reset command resets all given variables to the compile time defaults
1692        (hopefully mentioned in this manual). If you use the command set and prefix the
1693        variable with ``&'' this has the same behavior as the reset command.
1694
1695        With the reset command there exists the special variable ``all'', which allows
1696        you to reset all variables to their system defaults.
1697
1698        _\b3_\b._\b2_\b6  _\bR_\be_\ba_\bd_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bi_\bn_\bi_\bt_\bi_\ba_\bl_\bi_\bz_\ba_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd_\bs _\bf_\br_\bo_\bm _\ba_\bn_\bo_\bt_\bh_\be_\br _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be
1699
1700        Usage: source _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be [ _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be ... ]
1701
1702        This command allows the inclusion of initialization commands from other files.
1703        For example, I place all of my aliases in ~/.mail_aliases so that I can make my
1704        ~/.muttrc readable and keep my aliases private.
1705
1706        If the filename begins with a tilde (``~''), it will be expanded to the path of
1707        your home directory.
1708
1709        If the filename ends with a vertical bar (|), then _\bf_\bi_\bl_\be_\bn_\ba_\bm_\be is considered to be
1710        an executable program from which to read input (eg.  source ~/bin/myscript|).
1711
1712        _\b3_\b._\b2_\b7  _\bC_\bo_\bn_\bf_\bi_\bg_\bu_\br_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bf_\be_\ba_\bt_\bu_\br_\be_\bs _\bc_\bo_\bn_\bd_\bi_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn_\ba_\bl_\bl_\by
1713
1714        Usage: ifdef _\bi_\bt_\be_\bm _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd Usage: ifndef _\bi_\bt_\be_\bm _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd
1715
1716        These command allows to test if a variable, function or certain feature is
1717        available or not respectively, before actually executing the command.  ifdef
1718        (short for ``if defined) handles commands if upon availability while ifndef
1719
1720        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    33
1721
1722        (short for ``if not defined'') does if not. The _\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd may be any valid frac-
1723        tion of a configuration file.
1724
1725        All names of variables and functions may be tested. Additionally, the following
1726        compile-features may be tested when prefixed with 'feature_': ncurses, slang,
1727        iconv, idn, dotlock, standalone, pop, nntp, imap, ssl, gnutls, sasl, sasl2,
1728        libesmtp, compressed, color, classic_pgp, classic_smime, gpgme, header_cache.
1729
1730        Examples follow.
1731
1732        To only source a file with IMAP related settings only if IMAP support is com-
1733        piled in, use:
1734
1735             ifdef feature_imap 'source ~/.mutt-ng/imap_setup'
1736             # or
1737             # ifdef imap_user 'source ~/.mutt-ng/imap_setup'
1738             # or
1739             # ...
1740
1741        To exit mutt-ng directly if no NNTP support is compiled in:
1742
1743             ifndef feature_nntp 'push q'
1744             # or
1745             # ifndef newsrc 'push q'
1746             # or
1747             # ...
1748
1749        To only set the _\b<_\b$_\bi_\bm_\ba_\bp_\b__\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\b__\bc_\bh_\be_\bc_\bk (section 6.3.97  , page 87) when the system's
1750        SVN is recent enough to have it:
1751
1752             ifdef imap_mail_check 'set imap_mail_check=300'
1753
1754        _\b3_\b._\b2_\b8  _\bR_\be_\bm_\bo_\bv_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk_\bs
1755
1756        Usage: unhook [ * | _\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk_\b-_\bt_\by_\bp_\be ]
1757
1758        This command permits you to flush hooks you have previously defined.  You can
1759        either remove all hooks by giving the ``*'' character as an argument, or you
1760        can remove all hooks of a specific type by saying something like unhook send-
1761        hook.
1762
1763        _\b4_\b.  _\bA_\bd_\bv_\ba_\bn_\bc_\be_\bd _\bU_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be
1764
1765        _\b4_\b._\b1  _\bR_\be_\bg_\bu_\bl_\ba_\br _\bE_\bx_\bp_\br_\be_\bs_\bs_\bi_\bo_\bn_\bs
1766
1767        All string patterns in Mutt including those in more complex _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn_\bs (section
1768        4.2  , page 36) must be specified using regular expressions (regexp) in the
1769        ``POSIX extended'' syntax (which is more or less the syntax used by egrep and
1770        GNU awk).  For your convenience, we have included below a brief description of
1771        this syntax.
1772
1773        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    34
1774
1775        The search is case sensitive if the pattern contains at least one upper case
1776        letter, and case insensitive otherwise. Note that ``\'' must be quoted if used
1777        for a regular expression in an initialization command: ``\\''.
1778
1779        A regular expression is a pattern that describes a set of strings.  Regular
1780        expressions are constructed analogously to arithmetic expressions, by using
1781        various operators to combine smaller expressions.
1782
1783        Note that the regular expression can be enclosed/delimited by either ' or '
1784        which is useful if the regular expression includes a white-space character.
1785        See _\bS_\by_\bn_\bt_\ba_\bx _\bo_\bf _\bI_\bn_\bi_\bt_\bi_\ba_\bl_\bi_\bz_\ba_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn _\bF_\bi_\bl_\be_\bs (section 3.1  , page 14) for more informa-
1786        tion on ' and ' delimiter processing.  To match a literal ' or ' you must pref-
1787        ace it with \ (backslash).
1788
1789        The fundamental building blocks are the regular expressions that match a single
1790        character.  Most characters, including all letters and digits, are regular
1791        expressions that match themselves.  Any metacharacter with special meaning may
1792        be quoted by preceding it with a backslash.
1793
1794        The period ``.'' matches any single character.  The caret ``^'' and the dollar
1795        sign ``$'' are metacharacters that respectively match the empty string at the
1796        beginning and end of a line.
1797
1798        A list of characters enclosed by ``['' and ``]'' matches any single character
1799        in that list; if the first character of the list is a caret ``^'' then it
1800        matches any character n\bno\bot\bt in the list.  For example, the regular expression
1801        [\b[0\b01\b12\b23\b34\b45\b56\b67\b78\b89\b9]\b] matches any single digit.  A range of ASCII characters may be
1802        specified by giving the first and last characters, separated by a hyphen ``-''.
1803        Most metacharacters lose their special meaning inside lists.  To include a lit-
1804        eral ``]'' place it first in the list.  Similarly, to include a literal ``^''
1805        place it anywhere but first.  Finally, to include a literal hyphen ``-'' place
1806        it last.
1807
1808        Certain named classes of characters are predefined.  Character classes consist
1809        of ``[:'', a keyword denoting the class, and ``:]''.  The following classes are
1810        defined by the POSIX standard:
1811
1812              [:alnum:]
1813                    Alphanumeric characters.
1814
1815              [:alpha:]
1816                    Alphabetic characters.
1817
1818              [:blank:]
1819                    Space or tab characters.
1820
1821              [:cntrl:]
1822                    Control characters.
1823
1824              [:digit:]
1825                    Numeric characters.
1826
1827              [:graph:]
1828                    Characters that are both printable and visible.  (A space is
1829
1830        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    35
1831
1832                    printable, but not visible, while an ``a'' is both.)
1833
1834              [:lower:]
1835                    Lower-case alphabetic characters.
1836
1837              [:print:]
1838                    Printable characters (characters that are not control characters.)
1839
1840              [:punct:]
1841                    Punctuation characters (characters that are not letter, digits,
1842                    control characters, or space characters).
1843
1844              [:space:]
1845                    Space characters (such as space, tab and formfeed, to name a few).
1846
1847              [:upper:]
1848                    Upper-case alphabetic characters.
1849
1850              [:xdigit:]
1851                    Characters that are hexadecimal digits.
1852
1853        A character class is only valid in a regular expression inside the brackets of
1854        a character list.  Note that the brackets in these class names are part of the
1855        symbolic names, and must be included in addition to the brackets delimiting the
1856        bracket list.  For example, [\b[[\b[:\b:d\bdi\big\bgi\bit\bt:\b:]\b]]\b] is equivalent to [\b[0\b0-\b-9\b9]\b].
1857
1858        Two additional special sequences can appear in character lists.  These apply to
1859        non-ASCII character sets, which can have single symbols (called collating ele-
1860        ments) that are represented with more than one character, as well as several
1861        characters that are equivalent for collating or sorting purposes:
1862
1863              Collating Symbols
1864                    A collating symbol is a multi-character collating element enclosed
1865                    in ``[.'' and ``.]''.  For example, if ``ch'' is a collating ele-
1866                    ment, then [\b[[\b[.\b.c\bch\bh.\b.]\b]]\b] is a regexp that matches this collating ele-
1867                    ment, while [\b[c\bch\bh]\b] is a regexp that matches either ``c'' or ``h''.
1868
1869              Equivalence Classes
1870                    An equivalence class is a locale-specific name for a list of char-
1871                    acters that are equivalent. The name is enclosed in ``[='' and
1872                    ``=]''.  For example, the name ``e'' might be used to represent all
1873                    of ``'' ``'' and ``e''.  In this case, [\b[[\b[=\b=e\be=\b=]\b]]\b] is a regexp that
1874                    matches any of ``'', ``'' and ``e''.
1875
1876        A regular expression matching a single character may be followed by one of sev-
1877        eral repetition operators:
1878
1879              ?
1880                    The preceding item is optional and matched at most once.
1881
1882              *
1883                    The preceding item will be matched zero or more times.
1884
1885        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    36
1886
1887              +
1888                    The preceding item will be matched one or more times.
1889
1890              {n}
1891                    The preceding item is matched exactly _\bn times.
1892
1893              {n,}
1894                    The preceding item is matched _\bn or more times.
1895
1896              {,m}
1897                    The preceding item is matched at most _\bm times.
1898
1899              {n,m}
1900                    The preceding item is matched at least _\bn times, but no more than _\bm
1901                    times.
1902
1903        Two regular expressions may be concatenated; the resulting regular expression
1904        matches any string formed by concatenating two substrings that respectively
1905        match the concatenated subexpressions.
1906
1907        Two regular expressions may be joined by the infix operator ``|''; the result-
1908        ing regular expression matches any string matching either subexpression.
1909
1910        Repetition takes precedence over concatenation, which in turn takes precedence
1911        over alternation.  A whole subexpression may be enclosed in parentheses to
1912        override these precedence rules.
1913
1914        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: If you compile Mutt with the GNU _\br_\bx package, the following operators may
1915        also be used in regular expressions:
1916
1917              \\y
1918                    Matches the empty string at either the beginning or the end of a
1919                    word.
1920
1921              \\B
1922                    Matches the empty string within a word.
1923
1924              \\<
1925                    Matches the empty string at the beginning of a word.
1926
1927              \\>
1928                    Matches the empty string at the end of a word.
1929
1930              \\w
1931                    Matches any word-constituent character (letter, digit, or under-
1932                    score).
1933
1934              \\W
1935                    Matches any character that is not word-constituent.
1936
1937              \\`
1938                    Matches the empty string at the beginning of a buffer (string).
1939
1940        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    37
1941
1942              \\'
1943                    Matches the empty string at the end of a buffer.
1944
1945        Please note however that these operators are not defined by POSIX, so they may
1946        or may not be available in stock libraries on various systems.
1947
1948        _\b4_\b._\b2  _\bP_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn_\bs
1949
1950        Many of Mutt's commands allow you to specify a pattern to match (limit, tag-
1951        pattern, delete-pattern, etc.).  There are several ways to select messages:
1952
1953             ~A              all messages
1954             ~b EXPR         messages which contain EXPR in the message body
1955             ~B EXPR         messages which contain EXPR in the whole message
1956             ~c USER         messages carbon-copied to USER
1957             ~C EXPR         message is either to: or cc: EXPR
1958             ~D              deleted messages
1959             ~d [MIN]-[MAX]  messages with ``date-sent'' in a Date range
1960             ~E              expired messages
1961             ~e EXPR         message which contains EXPR in the ``Sender'' field
1962             ~F              flagged messages
1963             ~f USER         messages originating from USER
1964             ~g              cryptographically signed messages
1965             ~G              cryptographically encrypted messages
1966             ~H EXPR         messages with a spam attribute matching EXPR
1967             ~h EXPR         messages which contain EXPR in the message header
1968             ~k        message contains PGP key material
1969             ~i ID           message which match ID in the ``Message-ID'' field
1970             ~L EXPR         message is either originated or received by EXPR
1971             ~l              message is addressed to a known mailing list
1972             ~m [MIN]-[MAX]  message in the range MIN to MAX *)
1973             ~n [MIN]-[MAX]  messages with a score in the range MIN to MAX *)
1974             ~N              new messages
1975             ~O              old messages
1976             ~p              message is addressed to you (consults alternates)
1977             ~P              message is from you (consults alternates)
1978             ~Q              messages which have been replied to
1979             ~R              read messages
1980             ~r [MIN]-[MAX]  messages with ``date-received'' in a Date range
1981             ~S              superseded messages
1982             ~s SUBJECT      messages having SUBJECT in the ``Subject'' field.
1983             ~T              tagged messages
1984             ~t USER         messages addressed to USER
1985             ~U              unread messages
1986             ~v        message is part of a collapsed thread.
1987             ~V        cryptographically verified messages
1988             ~x EXPR         messages which contain EXPR in the `References' field
1989             ~y EXPR         messages which contain EXPR in the `X-Label' field
1990             ~z [MIN]-[MAX]  messages with a size in the range MIN to MAX *)
1991             ~=        duplicated messages (see $duplicate_threads)
1992             ~$        unreferenced messages (requires threaded view)
1993             ~*        ``From'' contains realname and (syntactically) valid
1994                       address (excluded are addresses matching against
1995
1996        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    38
1997
1998                       alternates or any alias)
1999
2000        Where EXPR, USER, ID, and SUBJECT are _\br_\be_\bg_\bu_\bl_\ba_\br _\be_\bx_\bp_\br_\be_\bs_\bs_\bi_\bo_\bn_\bs (section 4.1  , page
2001        33).  Special attention has to be made when using regular expressions inside of
2002        patterns.  Specifically, Mutt's parser for these patterns will strip one level
2003        of backslash (\), which is normally used for quoting.  If it is your intention
2004        to use a backslash in the regular expression, you will need to use two back-
2005        slashes instead (\\).
2006
2007        *) The forms <[MAX], >[MIN], [MIN]- and -[MAX] are allowed, too.
2008
2009        _\b4_\b._\b2_\b._\b1  _\bP_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn _\bM_\bo_\bd_\bi_\bf_\bi_\be_\br
2010
2011        Note that patterns matching 'lists' of addresses (notably c,C,p,P and t) match
2012        if there is at least one match in the whole list. If you want to make sure that
2013        all elements of that list match, you need to prefix your pattern with ^.  This
2014        example matches all mails which only has recipients from Germany.
2015
2016             ^~C \.de$
2017
2018        _\b4_\b._\b2_\b._\b2  _\bC_\bo_\bm_\bp_\bl_\be_\bx _\bP_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn_\bs
2019
2020        Logical AND is performed by specifying more than one criterion.  For example:
2021
2022             ~t mutt ~f elkins
2023
2024        would select messages which contain the word ``mutt'' in the list of recipients
2025        a\ban\bnd\bd that have the word ``elkins'' in the ``From'' header field.
2026
2027        Mutt also recognizes the following operators to create more complex search pat-
2028        terns:
2029
2030           +\bo ! -- logical NOT operator
2031
2032           +\bo | -- logical OR operator
2033
2034           +\bo () -- logical grouping operator
2035
2036        Here is an example illustrating a complex search pattern.  This pattern will
2037        select all messages which do not contain ``mutt'' in the ``To'' or ``Cc'' field
2038        and which are from ``elkins''.
2039
2040             !(~t mutt|~c mutt) ~f elkins
2041
2042        Here is an example using white space in the regular expression (note the ' and
2043        ' delimiters).  For this to match, the mail's subject must match the ``^Junk
2044        +From +Me$'' and it must be from either ``Jim +Somebody'' or ``Ed
2045
2046        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    39
2047
2048        +SomeoneElse'':
2049
2050              '~s "^Junk +From +Me$" ~f ("Jim +Somebody"|"Ed +SomeoneElse")'
2051
2052        Note that if a regular expression contains parenthesis, or a veritical bar
2053        ("|"), you m\bmu\bus\bst\bt enclose the expression in double or single quotes since those
2054        characters are also used to separate different parts of Mutt's pattern lan-
2055        guage.  For example,
2056
2057             ~f "me@(mutt\.org|cs\.hmc\.edu)"
2058
2059        Without the quotes, the parenthesis wouldn't end.  This would be separated to
2060        two OR'd patterns: _\b~_\bf _\bm_\be_\b@_\b(_\bm_\bu_\bt_\bt_\b\_\b._\bo_\br_\bg and _\bc_\bs_\b\_\b._\bh_\bm_\bc_\b\_\b._\be_\bd_\bu_\b). They are never what you
2061        want.
2062
2063        _\b4_\b._\b2_\b._\b3  _\bS_\be_\ba_\br_\bc_\bh_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bb_\by _\bD_\ba_\bt_\be
2064
2065        Mutt supports two types of dates, _\ba_\bb_\bs_\bo_\bl_\bu_\bt_\be and _\br_\be_\bl_\ba_\bt_\bi_\bv_\be.
2066
2067        A\bAb\bbs\bso\bol\blu\but\bte\be.  Dates m\bmu\bus\bst\bt be in DD/MM/YY format (month and year are optional,
2068        defaulting to the current month and year).  An example of a valid range of
2069        dates is:
2070
2071             Limit to messages matching: ~d 20/1/95-31/10
2072
2073        If you omit the minimum (first) date, and just specify ``-DD/MM/YY'', all mes-
2074        sages _\bb_\be_\bf_\bo_\br_\be the given date will be selected.  If you omit the maximum (second)
2075        date, and specify ``DD/MM/YY-'', all messages _\ba_\bf_\bt_\be_\br the given date will be
2076        selected.  If you specify a single date with no dash (``-''), only messages
2077        sent on the given date will be selected.
2078
2079        E\bEr\brr\bro\bor\br M\bMa\bar\brg\bgi\bin\bns\bs.  You can add error margins to absolute dates.  An error margin
2080        is a sign (+ or -), followed by a digit, followed by one of the following
2081        units:
2082
2083             y    years
2084             m    months
2085             w    weeks
2086             d    days
2087
2088        As a special case, you can replace the sign by a ``*'' character, which is
2089        equivalent to giving identical plus and minus error margins.
2090
2091        Example: To select any messages two weeks around January 15, 2001, you'd use
2092        the following pattern:
2093
2094        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    40
2095
2096             Limit to messages matching: ~d 15/1/2001*2w
2097
2098        R\bRe\bel\bla\bat\bti\biv\bve\be.  This type of date is relative to the current date, and may be speci-
2099        fied as:
2100
2101           +\bo >_\bo_\bf_\bf_\bs_\be_\bt (messages older than _\bo_\bf_\bf_\bs_\be_\bt units)
2102
2103           +\bo <_\bo_\bf_\bf_\bs_\be_\bt (messages newer than _\bo_\bf_\bf_\bs_\be_\bt units)
2104
2105           +\bo =_\bo_\bf_\bf_\bs_\be_\bt (messages exactly _\bo_\bf_\bf_\bs_\be_\bt units old)
2106
2107        _\bo_\bf_\bf_\bs_\be_\bt is specified as a positive number with one of the following units:
2108
2109             y       years
2110             m       months
2111             w       weeks
2112             d       days
2113
2114        Example: to select messages less than 1 month old, you would use
2115
2116             Limit to messages matching: ~d <1m
2117
2118        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: all dates used when searching are relative to the l\blo\boc\bca\bal\bl time zone, so
2119        unless you change the setting of your _\b$_\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt (section 6.3.108  , page
2120        89) to include a %[...] format, these are n\bno\bot\bt the dates shown in the main
2121        index.
2122
2123        _\b4_\b._\b3  _\bU_\bs_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bT_\ba_\bg_\bs
2124
2125        Sometimes it is desirable to perform an operation on a group of messages all at
2126        once rather than one at a time.  An example might be to save messages to a
2127        mailing list to a separate folder, or to delete all messages with a given sub-
2128        ject.  To tag all messages matching a pattern, use the tag-pattern function,
2129        which is bound to ``shift-T'' by default.  Or you can select individual mes-
2130        sages by hand using the ``tag-message'' function, which is bound to ``t'' by
2131        default.  See _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn_\bs (section 4.2  , page 36) for Mutt's pattern matching
2132        syntax.
2133
2134        Once you have tagged the desired messages, you can use the ``tag-prefix'' oper-
2135        ator, which is the ``;'' (semicolon) key by default.  When the ``tag-prefix''
2136        operator is used, the n\bne\bex\bxt\bt operation will be applied to all tagged messages if
2137        that operation can be used in that manner.  If the _\b$_\ba_\bu_\bt_\bo_\b__\bt_\ba_\bg (section 6.3.16  ,
2138        page 69) variable is set, the next operation applies to the tagged messages
2139        automatically, without requiring the ``tag-prefix''.
2140
2141        In _\bm_\ba_\bc_\br_\bo_\bs (section 3.6  , page 20) or _\bp_\bu_\bs_\bh (section 3.21  , page 29) commands,
2142        you can use the ``tag-prefix-cond'' operator.  If there are no tagged messages,
2143        mutt will "eat" the rest of the macro to abort it's execution.  Mutt will stop
2144        "eating" the macro when it encounters the ``end-cond'' operator;  after this
2145        operator the rest of the macro will be executed as normal.
2146
2147        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    41
2148
2149        _\b4_\b._\b4  _\bU_\bs_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bH_\bo_\bo_\bk_\bs
2150
2151        A _\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk is a concept borrowed from the EMACS editor which allows you to execute
2152        arbitrary commands before performing some operation.  For example, you may wish
2153        to tailor your configuration based upon which mailbox you are reading, or to
2154        whom you are sending mail.  In the Mutt world, a _\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk consists of a _\br_\be_\bg_\bu_\bl_\ba_\br
2155        _\be_\bx_\bp_\br_\be_\bs_\bs_\bi_\bo_\bn (section 4.1  , page 33) or _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn (section 4.2  , page 36) along
2156        with a configuration option/command.  See
2157
2158           +\bo _\bf_\bo_\bl_\bd_\be_\br_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.5  , page 19)
2159
2160           +\bo _\bs_\be_\bn_\bd_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.18  , page 27)
2161
2162           +\bo _\bm_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.19  , page 28)
2163
2164           +\bo _\bs_\ba_\bv_\be_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.15  , page 26)
2165
2166           +\bo _\bm_\bb_\bo_\bx_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.11  , page 25)
2167
2168           +\bo _\bf_\bc_\bc_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.16  , page 27)
2169
2170           +\bo _\bf_\bc_\bc_\b-_\bs_\ba_\bv_\be_\b-_\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 3.17  , page 27)
2171
2172        for specific details on each type of _\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk available.
2173
2174        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: if a hook changes configuration settings, these changes remain effective
2175        until the end of the current mutt session. As this is generally not desired, a
2176        default hook needs to be added before all other hooks to restore configuration
2177        defaults. Here is an example with send-hook and the my_hdr directive:
2178
2179             send-hook . 'unmy_hdr From:'
2180             send-hook ~C'^b@b\.b$' my_hdr from: c@c.c
2181
2182        _\b4_\b._\b4_\b._\b1  _\bM_\be_\bs_\bs_\ba_\bg_\be _\bM_\ba_\bt_\bc_\bh_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bi_\bn _\bH_\bo_\bo_\bk_\bs
2183
2184        Hooks that act upon messages (send-hook, save-hook, fcc-hook, message-hook) are
2185        evaluated in a slightly different manner.  For the other types of hooks, a _\br_\be_\bg_\b-
2186        _\bu_\bl_\ba_\br _\be_\bx_\bp_\br_\be_\bs_\bs_\bi_\bo_\bn (section 4.1  , page 33) is sufficient.  But in dealing with
2187        messages a finer grain of control is needed for matching since for different
2188        purposes you want to match different criteria.
2189
2190        Mutt allows the use of the _\bs_\be_\ba_\br_\bc_\bh _\bp_\ba_\bt_\bt_\be_\br_\bn (section 4.2  , page 36) language for
2191        matching messages in hook commands.  This works in exactly the same way as it
2192        would when _\bl_\bi_\bm_\bi_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg or _\bs_\be_\ba_\br_\bc_\bh_\bi_\bn_\bg the mailbox, except that you are restricted to
2193        those operators which match information mutt extracts from the header of the
2194        message (i.e.  from, to, cc, date, subject, etc.).
2195
2196        For example, if you wanted to set your return address based upon sending mail
2197        to a specific address, you could do something like:
2198
2199             send-hook '~t ^me@cs\.hmc\.edu$' 'my_hdr From: Mutt User <user@host>'
2200
2201        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    42
2202
2203        which would execute the given command when sending mail to _\bm_\be_\b@_\bc_\bs_\b._\bh_\bm_\bc_\b._\be_\bd_\bu.
2204
2205        However, it is not required that you write the pattern to match using the full
2206        searching language.  You can still specify a simple _\br_\be_\bg_\bu_\bl_\ba_\br _\be_\bx_\bp_\br_\be_\bs_\bs_\bi_\bo_\bn like the
2207        other hooks, in which case Mutt will translate your pattern into the full lan-
2208        guage, using the translation specified by the _\b$_\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt_\b__\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 6.3.45  ,
2209        page 75) variable.  The pattern is translated at the time the hook is declared,
2210        so the value of _\b$_\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt_\b__\bh_\bo_\bo_\bk (section 6.3.45  , page 75) that is in effect at
2211        that time will be used.
2212
2213        _\b4_\b._\b5  _\bU_\bs_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bt_\bh_\be _\bs_\bi_\bd_\be_\bb_\ba_\br
2214
2215        The sidebar, a feature specific to Mutt-ng, allows you to use a mailbox listing
2216        which looks very similar to the ones you probably know from GUI mail clients.
2217        The sidebar lists all specified mailboxes, shows the number in each and high-
2218        lights the ones with new email Use the following configuration commands:
2219
2220             set sidebar_visible="yes"
2221             set sidebar_width=25
2222
2223        If you want to specify the mailboxes you can do so with:
2224
2225             set mbox='=INBOX'
2226             mailboxes INBOX \
2227                       MBOX1 \
2228                       MBOX2 \
2229                       ...
2230
2231        You can also specify the colors for mailboxes with new mails by using:
2232
2233             color sidebar_new red black
2234             color sidebar white black
2235
2236        The available functions are:
2237
2238             sidebar-scroll-up      Scrolls the mailbox list up 1 page
2239             sidebar-scroll-down    Scrolls the mailbox list down 1 page
2240             sidebar-next           Highlights the next mailbox
2241             sidebar-next-new       Highlights the next mailbox with new mail
2242             sidebar-previous       Highlights the previous mailbox
2243             sidebar-open           Opens the currently highlighted mailbox
2244
2245        Reasonable key bindings look e.g. like this:
2246
2247        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    43
2248
2249             bind index \Cp sidebar-prev
2250             bind index \Cn sidebar-next
2251             bind index \Cb sidebar-open
2252             bind pager \Cp sidebar-prev
2253             bind pager \Cn sidebar-next
2254             bind pager \Cb sidebar-open
2255
2256             macro index B ':toggle sidebar_visible^M'
2257             macro pager B ':toggle sidebar_visible^M'
2258
2259        You can then go up and down by pressing Ctrl-P and Ctrl-N, and switch on and
2260        off the sidebar simply by pressing 'B'.
2261
2262        _\b4_\b._\b6  _\bE_\bx_\bt_\be_\br_\bn_\ba_\bl _\bA_\bd_\bd_\br_\be_\bs_\bs _\bQ_\bu_\be_\br_\bi_\be_\bs
2263
2264        Mutt supports connecting to external directory databases such as LDAP, ph/qi,
2265        bbdb, or NIS through a wrapper script which connects to mutt using a simple
2266        interface.  Using the _\b$_\bq_\bu_\be_\br_\by_\b__\bc_\bo_\bm_\bm_\ba_\bn_\bd (section 6.3.219  , page 118) variable,
2267        you specify the wrapper command to use.  For example:
2268
2269             set query_command = "mutt_ldap_query.pl '%s'"
2270
2271        The wrapper script should accept the query on the command-line.  It should
2272        return a one line message, then each matching response on a single line, each
2273        line containing a tab separated address then name then some other optional
2274        information.  On error, or if there are no matching addresses, return a non-
2275        zero exit code and a one line error message.
2276
2277        An example multiple response output:
2278
2279             Searching database ... 20 entries ... 3 matching:
2280             me@cs.hmc.edu           Michael Elkins  mutt dude
2281             blong@fiction.net       Brandon Long    mutt and more
2282             roessler@guug.de        Thomas Roessler mutt pgp
2283
2284        There are two mechanisms for accessing the query function of mutt.  One is to
2285        do a query from the index menu using the query function (default: Q).  This
2286        will prompt for a query, then bring up the query menu which will list the
2287        matching responses.  From the query menu, you can select addresses to create
2288        aliases, or to mail.  You can tag multiple addresses to mail, start a new
2289        query, or have a new query appended to the current responses.
2290
2291        The other mechanism for accessing the query function is for address completion,
2292        similar to the alias completion.  In any prompt for address entry, you can use
2293        the complete-query function (default: ^T) to run a query based on the current
2294        address you have typed.  Like aliases, mutt will look for what you have typed
2295        back to the last space or comma.  If there is a single response for that query,
2296        mutt will expand the address in place.  If there are multiple responses, mutt
2297        will activate the query menu.  At the query menu, you can select one or more
2298        addresses to be added to the prompt.
2299
2300        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    44
2301
2302        _\b4_\b._\b7  _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx _\bF_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt_\bs
2303
2304        Mutt supports reading and writing of four different mailbox formats: mbox,
2305        MMDF, MH and Maildir.  The mailbox type is autodetected, so there is no need to
2306        use a flag for different mailbox types.  When creating new mailboxes, Mutt uses
2307        the default specified with the _\b$_\bm_\bb_\bo_\bx_\b__\bt_\by_\bp_\be (section 6.3.123  , page 95) vari-
2308        able.
2309
2310        m\bmb\bbo\box\bx.  This is the most widely used mailbox format for UNIX.  All messages are
2311        stored in a single file.  Each message has a line of the form:
2312
2313             From me@cs.hmc.edu Fri, 11 Apr 1997 11:44:56 PST
2314
2315        to denote the start of a new message (this is often referred to as the
2316        ``From_'' line).
2317
2318        M\bMM\bMD\bDF\bF.  This is a variant of the _\bm_\bb_\bo_\bx format.  Each message is surrounded by
2319        lines containing ``^A^A^A^A'' (four control-A's).
2320
2321        M\bMH\bH. A radical departure from _\bm_\bb_\bo_\bx and _\bM_\bM_\bD_\bF, a mailbox consists of a directory
2322        and each message is stored in a separate file.  The filename indicates the mes-
2323        sage number (however, this is may not correspond to the message number Mutt
2324        displays). Deleted messages are renamed with a comma (,) prepended to the file-
2325        name. N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: Mutt detects this type of mailbox by looking for either
2326        .mh_sequences or .xmhcache (needed to distinguish normal directories from MH
2327        mailboxes).
2328
2329        M\bMa\bai\bil\bld\bdi\bir\br.  The newest of the mailbox formats, used by the Qmail MTA (a replace-
2330        ment for sendmail).  Similar to _\bM_\bH, except that it adds three subdirectories of
2331        the mailbox: _\bt_\bm_\bp, _\bn_\be_\bw and _\bc_\bu_\br.  Filenames for the messages are chosen in such a
2332        way they are unique, even when two programs are writing the mailbox over NFS,
2333        which means that no file locking is needed.
2334
2335        _\b4_\b._\b8  _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bb_\bo_\bx _\bS_\bh_\bo_\br_\bt_\bc_\bu_\bt_\bs
2336
2337        There are a number of built in shortcuts which refer to specific mailboxes.
2338        These shortcuts can be used anywhere you are prompted for a file or mailbox
2339        path.
2340
2341           +\bo ! -- refers to your _\b$_\bs_\bp_\bo_\bo_\bl_\bf_\bi_\bl_\be (section 6.3.293  , page 135) (incoming)
2342             mailbox
2343
2344           +\bo > -- refers to your _\b$_\bm_\bb_\bo_\bx (section 6.3.122  , page 95) file
2345
2346           +\bo < -- refers to your _\b$_\br_\be_\bc_\bo_\br_\bd (section 6.3.228  , page 120) file
2347
2348           +\bo ^ -- refers to the current mailbox
2349
2350           +\bo - or !! -- refers to the file you've last visited
2351
2352           +\bo ~ -- refers to your home directory
2353
2354        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    45
2355
2356           +\bo = or + -- refers to your _\b$_\bf_\bo_\bl_\bd_\be_\br (section 6.3.63  , page 79) directory
2357
2358           +\bo @_\ba_\bl_\bi_\ba_\bs -- refers to the _\bd_\be_\bf_\ba_\bu_\bl_\bt _\bs_\ba_\bv_\be _\bf_\bo_\bl_\bd_\be_\br (section 3.15  , page 26) as
2359             determined by the address of the alias
2360
2361        _\b4_\b._\b9  _\bH_\ba_\bn_\bd_\bl_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bM_\ba_\bi_\bl_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bL_\bi_\bs_\bt_\bs
2362
2363        Mutt has a few configuration options that make dealing with large amounts of
2364        mail easier.  The first thing you must do is to let Mutt know what addresses
2365        you consider to be mailing lists (technically this does not have to be a mail-
2366        ing list, but that is what it is most often used for), and what lists you are
2367        subscribed to.  This is accomplished through the use of the _\bl_\bi_\bs_\bt_\bs _\ba_\bn_\bd _\bs_\bu_\bb_\bs_\bc_\br_\bi_\bb_\be
2368        (section 3.10  , page 24) commands in your muttrc.
2369
2370        Now that Mutt knows what your mailing lists are, it can do several things, the
2371        first of which is the ability to show the name of a list through which you
2372        received a message (i.e., of a subscribed list) in the _\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx menu display.
2373        This is useful to distinguish between personal and list mail in the same mail-
2374        box.  In the _\b$_\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt (section 6.3.108  , page 89) variable, the escape
2375        ``%L'' will return the string ``To <list>'' when ``list'' appears in the ``To''
2376        field, and ``Cc <list>'' when it appears in the ``Cc'' field (otherwise it
2377        returns the name of the author).
2378
2379        Often times the ``To'' and ``Cc'' fields in mailing list messages tend to get
2380        quite large. Most people do not bother to remove the author of the message they
2381        are reply to from the list, resulting in two or more copies being sent to that
2382        person.  The ``list-reply'' function, which by default is bound to ``L'' in the
2383        _\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx menu and _\bp_\ba_\bg_\be_\br, helps reduce the clutter by only replying to the known
2384        mailing list addresses instead of all recipients (except as specified by Mail-
2385        Followup-To, see below).
2386
2387        Mutt also supports the Mail-Followup-To header.  When you send a message to a
2388        list of recipients which includes one or several subscribed mailing lists, and
2389        if the _\b$_\bf_\bo_\bl_\bl_\bo_\bw_\bu_\bp_\b__\bt_\bo (section 6.3.65  , page 80) option is set, mutt will gener-
2390        ate a Mail-Followup-To header which contains all the recipients to whom you
2391        send this message, but not your address. This indicates that group-replies or
2392        list-replies (also known as ``followups'') to this message should only be sent
2393        to the original recipients of the message, and not separately to you - you'll
2394        receive your copy through one of the mailing lists you are subscribed to.
2395
2396        Conversely, when group-replying or list-replying to a message which has a Mail-
2397        Followup-To header, mutt will respect this header if the _\b$_\bh_\bo_\bn_\bo_\br_\b__\bf_\bo_\bl_\bl_\bo_\bw_\bu_\bp_\b__\bt_\bo
2398        (section 6.3.87  , page 84) configuration variable is set.  Using list-reply
2399        will in this case also make sure that the reply goes to the mailing list, even
2400        if it's not specified in the list of recipients in the Mail-Followup-To.
2401
2402        Note that, when header editing is enabled, you can create a Mail-Followup-To
2403        header manually.  Mutt will only auto-generate this header if it doesn't exist
2404        when you send the message.
2405
2406        The other method some mailing list admins use is to generate a ``Reply-To''
2407        field which points back to the mailing list address rather than the author of
2408        the message.  This can create problems when trying to reply directly to the
2409        author in private, since most mail clients will automatically reply to the
2410
2411        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    46
2412
2413        address given in the ``Reply-To'' field.  Mutt uses the _\b$_\br_\be_\bp_\bl_\by_\b__\bt_\bo (section
2414        6.3.231  , page 120) variable to help decide which address to use.  If set to
2415        _\ba_\bs_\bk_\b-_\by_\be_\bs or _\ba_\bs_\bk_\b-_\bn_\bo, you will be prompted as to whether or not you would like to
2416        use the address given in the ``Reply-To'' field, or reply directly to the
2417        address given in the ``From'' field.  When set to _\by_\be_\bs, the ``Reply-To'' field
2418        will be used when present.
2419
2420        The ``X-Label:'' header field can be used to further identify mailing lists or
2421        list subject matter (or just to annotate messages individually).  The
2422        _\b$_\bi_\bn_\bd_\be_\bx_\b__\bf_\bo_\br_\bm_\ba_\bt (section 6.3.108  , page 89) variable's ``%y'' and ``%Y'' escapes
2423        can be used to expand ``X-Label:'' fields in the index, and Mutt's pattern-
2424        matcher can match regular expressions to ``X-Label:'' fields with the `` y''
2425        selector.  ``X-Label:'' is not a standard message header field, but it can eas-
2426        ily be inserted by procmail and other mail filtering agents.
2427
2428        Lastly, Mutt has the ability to _\bs_\bo_\br_\bt (section 6.3.287  , page 133) the mailbox
2429        into _\bt_\bh_\br_\be_\ba_\bd_\bs (section 2.3.3  , page 7).  A thread is a group of messages which
2430        all relate to the same subject.  This is usually organized into a tree-like
2431        structure where a message and all of its replies are represented graphically.
2432        If you've ever used a threaded news client, this is the same concept.  It makes
2433        dealing with large volume mailing lists easier because you can easily delete
2434        uninteresting threads and quickly find topics of value.
2435
2436        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b0  _\bE_\bd_\bi_\bt_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bt_\bh_\br_\be_\ba_\bd_\bs
2437
2438        Mutt has the ability to dynamically restructure threads that are broken either
2439        by misconfigured software or bad behavior from some correspondents. This allows
2440        to clean your mailboxes formats) from these annoyances which make it hard to
2441        follow a discussion.
2442
2443        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b0_\b._\b1  _\bL_\bi_\bn_\bk_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bt_\bh_\br_\be_\ba_\bd_\bs
2444
2445        Some mailers tend to "forget" to correctly set the "In-Reply-To:" and "Refer-
2446        ences:" headers when replying to a message. This results in broken discussions
2447        because Mutt has not enough information to guess the correct threading.  You
2448        can fix this by tagging the reply, then moving to the parent message and using
2449        the ``link-threads'' function (bound to & by default). The reply will then be
2450        connected to this "parent" message.
2451
2452        You can also connect multiple children at once, tagging them and using the tag-
2453        prefix command (';') or the auto_tag option.
2454
2455        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b0_\b._\b2  _\bB_\br_\be_\ba_\bk_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bt_\bh_\br_\be_\ba_\bd_\bs
2456
2457        On mailing lists, some people are in the bad habit of starting a new discussion
2458        by hitting "reply" to any message from the list and changing the subject to a
2459        totally unrelated one.  You can fix such threads by using the ``break-thread''
2460        function (bound by default to #), which will turn the subthread starting from
2461        the current message into a whole different thread.
2462
2463        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b1  _\bD_\be_\bl_\bi_\bv_\be_\br_\by _\bS_\bt_\ba_\bt_\bu_\bs _\bN_\bo_\bt_\bi_\bf_\bi_\bc_\ba_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn _\b(_\bD_\bS_\bN_\b) _\bS_\bu_\bp_\bp_\bo_\br_\bt
2464
2465        RFC1894 defines a set of MIME content types for relaying information about the
2466        status of electronic mail messages.  These can be thought of as ``return
2467
2468        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    47
2469
2470        receipts.'' Berkeley sendmail 8.8.x currently has some command line options in
2471        which the mail client can make requests as to what type of status messages
2472        should be returned.
2473
2474        To support this, there are two variables. _\b$_\bd_\bs_\bn_\b__\bn_\bo_\bt_\bi_\bf_\by (section 6.3.51  , page
2475        76) is used to request receipts for different results (such as failed message,
2476        message delivered, etc.).  _\b$_\bd_\bs_\bn_\b__\br_\be_\bt_\bu_\br_\bn (section 6.3.52  , page 76) requests how
2477        much of your message should be returned with the receipt (headers or full mes-
2478        sage).  Refer to the man page on sendmail for more details on DSN.
2479
2480        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b2  _\bP_\bO_\bP_\b3 _\bS_\bu_\bp_\bp_\bo_\br_\bt _\b(_\bO_\bP_\bT_\bI_\bO_\bN_\bA_\bL_\b)
2481
2482        If Mutt was compiled with POP3 support (by running the _\bc_\bo_\bn_\bf_\bi_\bg_\bu_\br_\be script with
2483        the _\b-_\b-_\be_\bn_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be_\b-_\bp_\bo_\bp flag), it has the ability to work with mailboxes located on a
2484        remote POP3 server and fetch mail for local browsing.
2485
2486        You can access the remote POP3 mailbox by selecting the folder
2487        pop://popserver/.
2488
2489        You can select an alternative port by specifying it with the server, i.e.:
2490        pop://popserver:port/.
2491
2492        You can also specify different username for each folder, i.e.: pop://user-
2493        name@popserver[:port]/.
2494
2495        Polling for new mail is more expensive over POP3 than locally. For this reason
2496        the frequency at which Mutt will check for mail remotely can be controlled by
2497        the _\b$_\bp_\bo_\bp_\b__\bc_\bh_\be_\bc_\bk_\bi_\bn_\bt_\be_\br_\bv_\ba_\bl (section , page ) variable, which defaults to every 60
2498        seconds.
2499
2500        If Mutt was compiled with SSL support (by running the _\bc_\bo_\bn_\bf_\bi_\bg_\bu_\br_\be script with the
2501        _\b-_\b-_\bw_\bi_\bt_\bh_\b-_\bs_\bs_\bl flag), connections to POP3 servers can be encrypted. This naturally
2502        requires that the server supports SSL encrypted connections. To access a folder
2503        with POP3/SSL, you should use pops: prefix, ie: pops://[user-
2504        name@]popserver[:port]/.
2505
2506        Another way to access your POP3 mail is the _\bf_\be_\bt_\bc_\bh_\b-_\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl function (default: G).
2507        It allows to connect to _\bp_\bo_\bp_\b__\bh_\bo_\bs_\bt (section 6.3.204  , page 114), fetch all your
2508        new mail and place it in the local _\bs_\bp_\bo_\bo_\bl_\bf_\bi_\bl_\be (section 6.3.293  , page 135).
2509        After this point, Mutt runs exactly as if the mail had always been local.
2510
2511        N\bNo\bot\bte\be:\b: If you only need to fetch all messages to local mailbox you should con-
2512        sider using a specialized program, such as fetchmail
2513
2514        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b3  _\bI_\bM_\bA_\bP _\bS_\bu_\bp_\bp_\bo_\br_\bt _\b(_\bO_\bP_\bT_\bI_\bO_\bN_\bA_\bL_\b)
2515
2516        If Mutt was compiled with IMAP support (by running the _\bc_\bo_\bn_\bf_\bi_\bg_\bu_\br_\be script with
2517        the _\b-_\b-_\be_\bn_\ba_\bb_\bl_\be_\b-_\bi_\bm_\ba_\bp flag), it has the ability to work with folders located on a
2518        remote IMAP server.
2519
2520        You can access the remote inbox by selecting the folder
2521        imap://imapserver/INBOX, where imapserver is the name of the IMAP server and
2522        INBOX is the special name for your spool mailbox on the IMAP server. If you
2523        want to access another mail folder at the IMAP server, you should use
2524
2525        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    48
2526
2527        imap://imapserver/path/to/folder where path/to/folder is the path of the folder
2528        you want to access.
2529
2530        You can select an alternative port by specifying it with the server, i.e.:
2531        imap://imapserver:port/INBOX.
2532
2533        You can also specify different username for each folder, i.e.: imap://user-
2534        name@imapserver[:port]/INBOX.
2535
2536        If Mutt was compiled with SSL support (by running the _\bc_\bo_\bn_\bf_\bi_\bg_\bu_\br_\be script with the
2537        _\b-_\b-_\bw_\bi_\bt_\bh_\b-_\bs_\bs_\bl flag), connections to IMAP servers can be encrypted. This naturally
2538        requires that the server supports SSL encrypted connections. To access a folder
2539        with IMAP/SSL, you should use imaps://[user-
2540        name@]imapserver[:port]/path/to/folder as your folder path.
2541
2542        Pine-compatible notation is also supported, i.e.  {[user-
2543        name@]imapserver[:port][/ssl]}path/to/folder
2544
2545        Note that not all servers use / as the hierarchy separator.  Mutt should cor-
2546        rectly notice which separator is being used by the server and convert paths
2547        accordingly.
2548
2549        When browsing folders on an IMAP server, you can toggle whether to look at only
2550        the folders you are subscribed to, or all folders with the _\bt_\bo_\bg_\bg_\bl_\be_\b-_\bs_\bu_\bb_\bs_\bc_\br_\bi_\bb_\be_\bd
2551        command.  See also the _\b$_\bi_\bm_\ba_\bp_\b__\bl_\bi_\bs_\bt_\b__\bs_\bu_\bb_\bs_\bc_\br_\bi_\bb_\be_\bd (section 6.3.96  , page 87) vari-
2552        able.
2553
2554        Polling for new mail on an IMAP server can cause noticeable delays. So, you'll
2555        want to carefully tune the _\b$_\bi_\bm_\ba_\bp_\b__\bm_\ba_\bi_\bl_\b__\bc_\bh_\be_\bc_\bk (section 6.3.97  , page 87) and
2556        _\b$_\bt_\bi_\bm_\be_\bo_\bu_\bt (section 6.3.313  , page 141) variables.
2557
2558        Note that if you are using mbox as the mail store on UW servers prior to
2559        v12.250, the server has been reported to disconnect a client if another client
2560        selects the same folder.
2561
2562        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b3_\b._\b1  _\bT_\bh_\be _\bF_\bo_\bl_\bd_\be_\br _\bB_\br_\bo_\bw_\bs_\be_\br
2563
2564        As of version 1.2, mutt supports browsing mailboxes on an IMAP server. This is
2565        mostly the same as the local file browser, with the following differences:
2566
2567           +\bo Instead of file permissions, mutt displays the string "IMAP", possibly
2568             followed by the symbol "+", indicating that the entry contains both mes-
2569             sages and subfolders. On Cyrus-like servers folders will often contain
2570             both messages and subfolders.
2571
2572           +\bo For the case where an entry can contain both messages and subfolders, the
2573             selection key (bound to enter by default) will choose to descend into the
2574             subfolder view. If you wish to view the messages in that folder, you must
2575             use view-file instead (bound to space by default).
2576
2577           +\bo You can create, delete and rename mailboxes with the create-mailbox,
2578             delete-mailbox, and rename-mailbox commands (default bindings: C, d and r,
2579             respectively). You may also subscribe and unsubscribe to mailboxes (nor-
2580             mally these are bound to s and u, respectively).
2581
2582        The Mutt-ng E-Mail Client                                                    49
2583
2584        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b3_\b._\b2  _\bA_\bu_\bt_\bh_\be_\bn_\bt_\bi_\bc_\ba_\bt_\bi_\bo_\bn
2585
2586        Mutt supports four authentication methods with IMAP servers: SASL, GSSAPI,
2587        CRAM-MD5, and LOGIN (there is a patch by Grant Edwards to add NTLM authentica-
2588        tion for you poor exchange users out there, but it has yet to be integrated
2589        into the main tree). There is also support for the pseudo-protocol ANONYMOUS,
2590        which allows you to log in to a public IMAP server without having an account.
2591        To use ANONYMOUS, simply make your username blank or "anonymous".
2592
2593        SASL is a special super-authenticator, which selects among several protocols
2594        (including GSSAPI, CRAM-MD5, ANONYMOUS, and DIGEST-MD5) the most secure method
2595        available on your host and the server. Using some of these methods (including
2596        DIGEST-MD5 and possibly GSSAPI), your entire session will be encrypted and
2597        invisible to those teeming network snoops. It is the best option if you have
2598        it. To use it, you must have the Cyrus SASL library installed on your system
2599        and compile mutt with the _\b-_\b-_\bw_\bi_\bt_\bh_\b-_\bs_\ba_\bs_\bl flag.
2600
2601        Mutt will try whichever methods are compiled in and available on the server, in
2602        the following order: SASL, ANONYMOUS, GSSAPI, CRAM-MD5, LOGIN.
2603
2604        There are a few variables which control authentication:
2605
2606           +\bo _\b$_\bi_\bm_\ba_\bp_\b__\bu_\bs_\be_\br (section 6.3.103  , page 88) - controls the username under
2607             which you request authentication on the IMAP server, for all authentica-
2608             tors. This is overridden by an explicit username in the mailbox path (i.e.
2609             by using a mailbox name of the form {user@host}).
2610
2611           +\bo _\b$_\bi_\bm_\ba_\bp_\b__\bp_\ba_\bs_\bs (section 6.3.98  , page 87) - a password which you may preset,
2612             used by all authentication methods where a password is needed.
2613
2614           +\bo _\b$_\bi_\bm_\ba_\bp_\b__\ba_\bu_\bt_\bh_\be_\bn_\bt_\bi_\bc_\ba_\bt_\bo_\br_\bs (section 6.3.90  , page 85) - a colon-delimited list
2615             of IMAP authentication methods to try, in the order you wish to try them.
2616             If specified, this overrides mutt's default (attempt everything, in the
2617             order listed above).
2618
2619        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b4  _\bM_\ba_\bn_\ba_\bg_\bi_\bn_\bg _\bm_\bu_\bl_\bt_\bi_\bp_\bl_\be _\bI_\bM_\bA_\bP_\b/_\bP_\bO_\bP _\ba_\bc_\bc_\bo_\bu_\bn_\bt_\bs _\b(_\bO_\bP_\bT_\bI_\bO_\bN_\bA_\bL_\b)
2620
2621        If you happen to have accounts on multiple IMAP and/or POP servers, you may
2622        find managing all the authentication settings inconvenient and error-prone.
2623        The account-hook command may help. This hook works like folder-hook but is
2624        invoked whenever you access a remote mailbox (including inside the folder
2625        browser), not just when you open the mailbox.
2626
2627        Some examples:
2628
2629             account-hook . 'unset imap_user; unset imap_pass; unset tunnel'
2630             account-hook imap://host1/ 'set imap_user=me1 imap_pass=foo'
2631             account-hook imap://host2/ 'set tunnel="ssh host2 /usr/libexec/imapd"'
2632
2633        _\b4_\b._\b1_\b5  _\bS_\bt_\ba_\br_\bt _\ba _\bW_\bW_\bW _\bB_\br_\bo_\bw_\bs_\be_\br _\bo_\bn _\bU_\bR_\bL_\bs _\b(_\bE_\bX_\bT_\bE_\bR_\bN_\bA_\bL_\b)
2634
2635        If a message contains URLs (_\bu_\bn_\bi_\bf_\bi_\be_\bd _\br_\be_\bs_\bo_\bu_\br_\bc_\b